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What is the !! (not not) operator in JavaScript?
Reference - What does this symbol mean in JavaScript?

I find the js code write like this : !!undefined , !!false;

the jquery source code (jQuery 1.7.0.js: Line 748):

grep: function( elems, callback, inv ) {       
    var ret = [], retVal;        
    inv = !!inv;         
    // Go through the array, only saving the items       
    // that pass the validator function        
    for ( var i = 0, length = elems.length; i < length; i++ ){              
        retVal = !!callback( elems[ i ], i );            
        if ( inv !== retVal ) {                
            ret.push( elems[ i ] );            
        }        
    }         
    return ret;    
}
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marked as duplicate by Wesley Murch, pst, nnnnnn, Andrew Marshall, Graviton Mar 10 '12 at 0:51

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Well, that does !expr do? What does !(!expr) do? Put the little parts together into a bigger part :) –  user166390 Mar 9 '12 at 5:28
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

! means opposite

So !! means double opposite.

It is also commonly used in this case:

var check = !!(window.something && window.runthis)
//If something exists and runthis exists, then
//check = true

//If one of them is not exist, then
//check = false

Commonly used in checking browser compatibly.

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It's a shorthand way of casting a non-boolean object to a boolean.

For example, !!0 would convert to false.

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its simply double negation used to coerce any data type (null, undefined, objects) to boolean

http://navirudra.com/blog/javascript/javascript-double-negative-trick.html

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