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I have this situation where I am reading about 130K records containing dates stored as String fields. Some records contain blanks (nulls), some contain strings like this: 'dd-MMM-yy' and some contain this 'dd/MM/yyyy'.

I have written a method like this:

public Date parsedate(String date){

   if(date !== null){
      try{
        1. create a SimpleDateFormat object using 'dd-MMM-yy' as the pattern
        2. parse the date
        3. return the parsed date
      }catch(ParseException e){
          try{
              1. create a SimpleDateFormat object using 'dd/MM/yyy' as the pattern
              2. parse the date
              3. return parsed date
           }catch(ParseException e){
              return null
           }
      }
   }else{
      return null
   }

}

So you may have already spotted the problem. I am using the try .. catch as part of my logic. It would be better is I can determine before hand that the String actually contains a parseable date in some format then attempt to parse it.

So, is there some API or library that can help with this? I do not mind writing several different Parse classes to handle the different formats and then creating a factory to select the correct6 one, but, how do I determine which one?

Thanks.

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2  
If you decide to keep your solution, then please create only 2 instances of SimpleDateFormat and store them as constants in your class rather then creating them 130K times. –  van Jun 7 '09 at 22:48
2  
If you do store them as constants, make absolutely sure they are not used from multiple threads at once! I ran into problems with that earlier and contributed a FindBugs detector, that finds static DateFormats and Calendars. They are documented as non-thread-safe, but that's easy to miss. See dschneller.blogspot.com/2007/04/… , dschneller.blogspot.com/2007/04/… and dschneller.blogspot.com/2007/05/… –  Daniel Schneller Jun 7 '09 at 23:42
5  
@van: Don't do that. SimpleDateFormat is not thread-safe, so if you use the class from more than one thread, things will blow up in your face. –  Apocalisp Jun 7 '09 at 23:43
    
I think that I will take everyones advice and continue using the try ..catch for now since this is really a one off app so I will not be running it in a production environment. But I will make the Functional Java the long term solution. It feels clean to me. Thanks. –  Morgul Master Jun 8 '09 at 1:38
1  
After having gone through a long debugging process because of the thread safety problem, I would suggest using JODA. It is completely thread safe since all formatters adn date times are immutable. –  user44242 Jun 8 '09 at 7:54
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11 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

See Lazy Error Handling in Java for an overview of how to eliminate try/catch blocks using an Option type.

Functional Java is your friend.

In essence, what you want to do is to wrap the date parsing in a function that doesn't throw anything, but indicates in its return type whether parsing was successful or not. For example:

import fj.F; import fj.F2;
import fj.data.Option;
import java.text.SimpleDateFormat;
import java.text.ParseException;
import static fj.Function.curry;
import static fj.Option.some;
import static fj.Option.none;
...

F<String, F<String, Option<Date>>> parseDate =
  curry(new F2<String, String, Option<Date>>() {
    public Option<Date> f(String pattern, String s) {
      try {
        return some(new SimpleDateFormat(pattern).parse(s));
      }
      catch (ParseException e) {
        return none();
      }
    }
  });

OK, now you've a reusable date parser that doesn't throw anything, but indicates failure by returning a value of type Option.None. Here's how you use it:

import fj.data.List;
import static fj.data.Stream.stream;
import static fj.data.Option.isSome_;
....
public Option<Date> parseWithPatterns(String s, Stream<String> patterns) { 
  return stream(s).apply(patterns.map(parseDate)).find(isSome_()); 
}

That will give you the date parsed with the first pattern that matches, or a value of type Option.None, which is type-safe whereas null isn't.

If you're wondering what Stream is... it's a lazy list. This ensures that you ignore patterns after the first successful one. No need to do too much work.

Call your function like this:

for (Date d: parseWithPatterns(someString, stream("dd/MM/yyyy", "dd-MM-yyyy")) {
  // Do something with the date here.
}

Or...

Option<Date> d = parseWithPatterns(someString,
                                   stream("dd/MM/yyyy", "dd-MM-yyyy"));
if (d.isNone()) {
  // Handle the case where neither pattern matches.
} 
else {
  // Do something with d.some()
}
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This is a very interesting answer. I will definitely have to look up Functional Java. Thanks. –  Morgul Master Jun 8 '09 at 1:25
    
Great answer, def +1 –  Ankur Aug 12 '11 at 8:45
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Don't be too hard on yourself about using try-catch in logic: this is one of those situations where Java forces you to so there's not a lot you can do about it.

But in this case you could instead use DateFormat.parse(String, ParsePosition).

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You can take advantage of regular expressions to determine which format the string is in, and whether it matches any valid format. Something like this (not tested):

(Oops, I wrote this in C# before checking to see what language you were using.)

Regex test = new Regex(@"^(?:(?<formatA>\d{2}-[a-zA-Z]{3}-\d{2})|(?<formatB>\d{2}/\d{2}/\d{3}))$", RegexOption.Compiled);
Match match = test.Match(yourString);
if (match.Success)
{
    if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(match.Groups["formatA"]))
    {
        // Use format A.
    }
    else if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(match.Groups["formatB"]))
    {
        // Use format B.
    }
    ...
}
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If you formats are exact (June 7th 1999 would be either 07-Jun-99 or 07/06/1999: you are sure that you have leading zeros), then you could just check for the length of the string before trying to parse.

Be careful with the short month name in the first version, because Jun may not be June in another language.

But if your data is coming from one database, then I would just convert all dates to the common format (it is one-off, but then you control the data and its format).

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In this limited situation, the best (and fastest method) is certinally to parse out the day, then based on the next char either '/' or '-' try to parse out the rest. and if at any point there is unexpected data, return NULL then.

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Looks like three options if you only have two, known formats:

  • check for the presence of - or / first and start with that parsing for that format.
  • check the length since "dd-MMM-yy" and "dd/MM/yyyy" are different
  • use precompiled regular expressions

The latter seems unnecessary.

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Checking length should be faster in Java then searching for a char in. –  van Jun 7 '09 at 22:46
    
@van: No need for premature optimization. –  Eddie Jun 8 '09 at 0:50
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Use regular expressions to parse your string. Make sure that you keep both regex's pre-compiled (not create new on every method call, but store them as constants), and compare if it actually is faster then the try-catch you use.

I still find it strange that your method returns null if both versions fail rather then throwing an exception.

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you could use split to determine which format to use

String[] parts = date.split("-");
df = (parts.length==3 ? format1 : format2);

That assumes they are all in one or the other format, you could improve the checking if need be

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Assuming the patterns you gave are the only likely choices, I would look at the String passed in to see which format to apply.

public Date parseDate(final String date) {
  if (date == null) {
    return null;
  }

  SimpleDateFormat format = (date.charAt(2) == '/') ? new SimpleDateFormat("dd/MMM/yyyy")
                                                   : new SimpleDateFormat("dd-MMM-yy");
  try {
    return format.parse(date);
  } catch (ParseException e) {
    // Log a complaint and include date in the complaint
  }
  return null;
}

As others have mentioned, if you can guarantee that you will never access the DateFormats in a multi-threaded manner, you can make class-level or static instances.

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An alternative to creating a SimpleDateFormat (or two) per iteration would be to lazily populate a ThreadLocal container for these formats. This will solve both Thread safety concerns and concerns around object creation performance.

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A simple utility class I have written for my project. Hope this helps someone.

Usage examples:

DateUtils.multiParse("1-12-12");
DateUtils.multiParse("2-24-2012");
DateUtils.multiParse("3/5/2012");
DateUtils.multiParse("2/16/12");




public class DateUtils {

    private static List<SimpleDateFormat> dateFormats = new ArrayList<SimpleDateFormat>();



    private Utils() {
        dateFormats.add(new SimpleDateFormat("MM/dd/yy")); // must precede yyyy
        dateFormats.add(new SimpleDateFormat("MM/dd/yyyy"));
        dateFormats.add(new SimpleDateFormat("MM-dd-yy"));
        dateFormats.add(new SimpleDateFormat("MM-dd-yyyy"));            

    }
        private static Date tryToParse(String input, SimpleDateFormat format) {
        Date date  = null;
        try {
            date = format.parse(input);
        } catch (ParseException e) {

        }

        return date;
    }

        public static Date multiParse(String input)  {
        Date date = null;
        for (SimpleDateFormat format : dateFormats) {
            date = tryToParse(input, format);
            if (date != null) break;
        }
        return date;
    }
}
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