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I prefer to write solid shell code, so the errexit & nounset is alway set.

The following code will stop at bad_command line

#!/bin/bash
set -o errexit ; set -o nounset
bad_command # stop here
good_command

I want to capture it, here is my method

#!/bin/bash
set -o errexit ; set -o nounset
rc=1
bad_command && rc=0 # stop here
[ $rc -ne 0 ] && do_err_handle
good_command

Is there any better or cleaner method

My Answer:

#!/bin/bash
set -o errexit ; set -o nounset
if ! `bad_command` ; then
  # error handle here
fi
good_command
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2  
Don't set errexit if you want to handle errors. Handle errors if you want to handle errors. Setting errexit is abdicating from your responsibility to handle errors properly. I've never found it necessary to use nounset, but I am reasonably good at spelling consistently. –  Jonathan Leffler Mar 9 '12 at 6:28
11  
Always use errexit even if you want to handle errors. Any external command can fail and unless you plan on adding error handling for each|command|in|a&&work||flow then errexit will at least help protect you and the user. Same with nounset, not using it is like not using assert in other languages (because I never make errors, ever...) –  Paul Hargreaves Sep 12 '12 at 20:54
    
FYI, none of these catch the full range of errexit codes. If your bad_command internally calls another command, e.g. bad_com2, then errexit would crash the entire program. However, the checks listed here would miss the exit code of bad_com2 as long as it doesn't affect the exit code of bad_command. Given that you're asking this question, you're probably well aware of this limitation, but others might think that these methods are a replacement for errexit :-) –  Hamy Jun 18 at 6:54
    
My above comment shows a bad situation too - you can't have a 'test' for "will errexit causing a failure" - your only option is to enable it and see. –  Hamy Jun 18 at 6:56

5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

How about this? If you want the actual exit code ...

#!/bin/sh                                                                       
set -e

cat /tmp/doesnotexist && rc=$? || rc=$?                                         
echo done $rc        

cat /dev/null && rc=$? || rc=$?                                                 
echo done $rc   

Output:

cat: /tmp/doesnotexist: No such file or directory
done 1
done 0
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I like this method, it is lean. –  Daniel YC Lin Apr 6 '13 at 23:17

Agree with comments, so if you can give up errexit then you can easily shorten your code to

 bad_command || do_err_handle
 good_command

I hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks, I don't want to give up errexit. You give me good hint. –  Daniel YC Lin Mar 16 '12 at 1:19
2  
To expand on this: bad_command || { echo "My error message explaining why the crash"; exit 1} –  Paul Hargreaves Sep 12 '12 at 20:49

Keep with errexit. It can help find bugs that otherwise might have unpredictable (and hard to detect) results.

#!/bin/bash
set -o errexit ; set -o nounset

bad_command || do_err_handle
good_command

The above will work fine. errexit only requires that the line pass, as you do with the bad_command && rc=0. Therefore, the above with the 'or' will only run do_err_handle if bad_command fails and, as long as do_err_handle doesn't also 'fail', then the script will continue.

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3  
This is the correct way of doing it. To expand further, bad_command || { echo "My error message explaining why the crash"; exit 1} –  Paul Hargreaves Sep 12 '12 at 20:58

what if you want to know exit status of bad_command?

I think the simplest way is to disable errexit:

#!/bin/sh
set -o errexit

some_code_here

set +o errexit
bad_command
status=$?
set -o errexit
process $status
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3  
This technique is ok if you only have to catch one command, but if you want to correctly handle lots of commands that may return codes (like grep, diff etc) then it'll prove painful. –  Paul Hargreaves Sep 12 '12 at 20:51
    
@PaulHargreaves but this seems really the only way to get the error code of the command. Probably needed, but useful in some cases. –  vadipp Feb 8 '13 at 3:43
set -o errexit

bad_command || {
  resp_code=$?
  echo Bad Thing $resp_code happened
}
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