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I have a function that returns me list of int values depends on part of values:

private List<int> GetColumn(int total, int column)
{
    List<int> retList = new List<int>();

    if (total <= 0)
    {
        return retList;
    }

    if (column < 0 || column > 2)
    {
        column = 0;
    }

    int pageSize = total / 3;

    int startIndex = column * pageSize;
    int endIndex = column * pageSize + pageSize;

    if (endIndex > total)
    {
        endIndex = total;
    }

    for (int i = startIndex; i < endIndex; i++)
    {
        retList.Add(i);
    }

    return retList;

}

but it works wrong, because for: GetColumn(17, 0)

it returns [0,1,2,3,4], but should return [0,1,2,3,4,5]
for GetColumn(17, 1) - [6,7,8,9,10,11]
for GetColumn(17, 2) - [12,13,14,15,16]

for 16 it should return: for GetColumn(16, 0) - [0,1,2,3,4,5]
for GetColumn(16, 1) - [6,7,8,9,10]
for GetColumn(16, 2) - [11,12,13,14,15]

What should I change in my function? Thanks!

share|improve this question
1  
Your first example, returns 6 elements for the (17,1) call, but 5 elements for the (17,0) and (17,2) calls. If the number of elements it's not divisible by three, how will this logic work? Should a random "page" get the extra element, or always the one in the middle? What about if there are two "extra" elements? The one in the middle and the first, or the one in the middle and the last? –  Øyvind Bråthen Mar 9 '12 at 6:45
    
int divided by int is still an int. At least one operand has to be float/double to make the result non-int. –  Uwe Keim Mar 9 '12 at 6:45
    
No, it's not necessary to divide more than 3 –  ihorko Mar 9 '12 at 7:10

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If this is what you need (numbers increase columnwise but rows need to be filled first):

for 16:
0  6  11
1  7  12
2  8  13
3  9  14
4  10 15
5

for 17:
0  6  12
1  7  13
2  8  14
3  9  15
4  10 16
5  11

You need to define which column is getting the remainders:

int remainder = total % 3;

if remainder is 1, only first column is 6 elements. if remainder is 2, first & second columns are 6 elements. You need to calculate startIndex and endIndex according to this.

So;

int pageSize = total / 3;
int remainder = total % 3;

int startIndex = column * pageSize + min(column, remainder);
int endIndex = startIndex + pageSize + (remainder > column ? 1 : 0);

should work. I just tested it, it works for different rowsizes than 3.

Here is how I got the formulas, drawing tables is good practice for sorting out such algortihms:

r:Remainder, c:column, ps:pagesize (as calculated above)

StartingIndex:
.  |r:0 |r:1   |r:2
----------------------
c:0|0   |0     |0
----------------------
c:1|ps  |ps+1  |ps+1
----------------------
c:2|ps*2|ps*2+1|ps*2+2

You can see a pattern if you extend the table for rowsize 4:

StartingIndex:
.  |r:0 |r:1   |r:2   |r:3
------------------------------
c:0|0   |0     |0     |0
------------------------------
c:1|ps  |ps+1  |ps+1  |ps+1
------------------------------
c:2|ps*2|ps*2+1|ps*2+2|ps*2+2
------------------------------
c:3|ps*3|ps*3+1|ps*3+2|ps*3+3

the value you are adding is the minimum of the related column and remainder

Similarly for the endIndex, desired columns length can be seen when you build a table for given remainder vs column. I won't write that for now because it is taking too much time to draw the tables here and I believe you already got the idea.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, it exactly what I need, but how to implement in in the function to return correct range for columns 1 and 2? –  ihorko Mar 9 '12 at 7:38
    
I updated my answer, adding some more explanation. –  bmkorkut Mar 9 '12 at 8:06
    
Thanks, but startIndex and endIndex are wrong for different columns :( –  ihorko Mar 9 '12 at 9:42
    
oops! i miswrite "remainder > column" in the endIndex calculation. It should work fine now, i tested it. –  bmkorkut Mar 9 '12 at 12:03

The integer division rounds to towards zero. So 17/3 = 5 and -17/3 = -5
I think what you want is to round to the next integer like this

int pageSize = (int)Math.Ceiling(total / 3d);
share|improve this answer
    
in this case it doesn't work too, because for GetColumn(16, 0) it returns 5 values, but should return 6, GetColumn(16, 1) - 5, GetColumn(16, 2) - 5 –  ihorko Mar 9 '12 at 7:17
    
Yes I apologize for the error. I just fixed it. –  Elias Mar 9 '12 at 7:23
    
It also doesn't work correct, since for 1st and 2nd columns it returns 6 values, but for third just 4, but should return: 6, 5, 5 –  ihorko Mar 9 '12 at 7:30

If I understand correctly the requirement is:

If the number is 3n,   divide it in 3 groups of n,   n   and n   elements.
If the number is 3n+1, divide it in 3 groups of n+1, n   and n   elements.
If the number is 3n+2, divide it in 3 groups of n+1, n+1 and n   elements.

Best thing to do is to make that explicit in your code, and avoid any "clever" logic. The straight-forward splitting boils down to:

If the number is 3n, the divisions are:
     0 ..  n-1
     n .. 2n-1
    2n .. 3n-1
If the number is 3n+1, the divisions are:
     0 .. n
   n+1 .. 2n
  2n+1 .. 3n
If the number is 3n+2, the divisions are:
     0 .. n
   n+1 .. 2n+1
  2n+2 .. 3n+1

In c# that would be something like:

public static List<int> Divide3Columns(int total, int column)
{
  int startIndex = 0;
  int endIndex = 0;
  int pageSize = total / 3;

  if (total % 3 == 0)
  {
    startIndex = column * pageSize;
    endIndex = (column + 1) * pageSize - 1;
  }

  if (total % 3 == 1)
  {
    if (column == 0)
    {
      startIndex = 0;
      endIndex = pageSize; //pageSize + 1 elements;
    }
    else
    {
      startIndex = column * pageSize + 1;
      endIndex = (column + 1) * pageSize;
    }
  }

  if (total % 3 == 2)
  {
    if (column == 2)
    {
      startIndex = 2 * pageSize + 2;
      endIndex = 3 * pageSize + 1; //same as total - 1;
    }
    else
    {
      startIndex = column * (pageSize + 1);
      endIndex = (column + 1) * pageSize + column;
    }
  }

  List<int> result = new List<int>();
  for (int i = startIndex; i <= endIndex; i++)
  {
    result.Add(i);
  }
  return result;
}

The answer assumes that we will always divide in 3, and only 3 columns. If the number is variable, the logic to determine the columns can be generalized.

share|improve this answer
    
it doesn't work –  ihorko Mar 9 '12 at 10:05
    
@ihorko fixed it, and added a more complete example –  SWeko Mar 9 '12 at 12:50

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