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I have a performance sensitive CUDA code, which I'm using

#ifdef DEBUG_<NAME_OF_SECTION>
   ...
#else
   ...
#endif

...conditionals to encapsulate speed-crippling debugging code, which grabs extra info off the GPU.

Everything goes well in emacs (Centos 6.0) up until the #else.

This deindents (by 1 tab) the text inside the else clause of the preprocessor conditional and continues to deindent everything afterwards.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Note: ) replication inside preprocessor conditionals seems to be properly handled by the C-mode. But ); duplication breaks things, forcing you to move the ); outside the conditional ... oh dear how inconsistent. I'm keeping this question open until we get proper elisp code to fix this inconsistency. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

NOTE on current answer:
Jens has provided inaccurate information in claiming that indenting nested ) inside conditionals is "impossible". It is not only possible, but Emacs' C-Mode actively does this. Note the proper indentation of the example c program at the end of this question post for proof of that. So it would stand to reason that ); is also feasible to indent, though caution should be exercised for the reasons outlined by Jens.

Anyhow, I want to make sure people see that statement is incorrect, so they do not think this question is unanswerable. I will remove this comment and my downvote on Jens' post when he amends his inaccurate statements to reflect that it is possible, is implemented in C-mode for the very case of ) he outlines, but is not recommended.

Currently I'm resorting to manually respacing things forward one tab, but it's wasting a lot of time (the code is long).

Any idea what I can add to my ~/.emacs file to fix this???

Thanks in advance!

EDIT 1 I should mention that the clause it seems to be choking on is a function closing, e.g.

      MyFunc<<<Blk,Thr>>>(Stuff1,
  #ifdef DEBUG_FUNC1
                          Stuff2,
                          dev_Debug);
  #else
                       Stuff2); //Deindents here.
  #endif
  //Everything here on out is deindented.

It may be a specific failure on that kind of code structure...

EDIT 2 Here's a simply C code version... the code works as expected, but not the deindent on the last #else clause...

#include <stdio.h>

//#define DEBUG

void printer
(int A,
#ifdef DEBUG
 int B,
 int C)
#else
 int B)
#endif
{
#ifdef DEBUG
   printf("A: %i, B: %i, C: %i\n", A, B, C);
#else
   printf("A: %i, B: %i\n", A, B);
#endif
}

int main()
{
   int A = -3;
   int B = 1;
   int C = 3;
   printer(A,
#ifdef DEBUG
       B,
       C);
#else
   B);
#endif
   return 0;
}

...that's along the lines of what I'm doing. I know it works syntactically in C (or at least I think does... it gives correct results), however emacs doesn't like that #else clause inside the function call....

share|improve this question
    
If you count the number of opening and closing braces ({}) in the code between the #ifdef and the #else, do they all match? –  Joachim Pileborg Mar 9 '12 at 7:12
    
See the example... there are no {}... in the preprocessor section that it's choking on. It seems to not like me using the preprocessor else within a function call. Post a non-CUDA example so I can show what I mean... –  Jason R. Mick Mar 9 '12 at 7:22
1  
Consider putting more (e.g. a duplicate definition if required) in each branch. I suspect it is due to the ")" in the first path. –  user166390 Mar 9 '12 at 7:23
1  
Squiggly or square braces ([]) or parentheses, it doesn't matter, it has to be matching number of opening and closing. Emacs C and C++ modes are stupid in a way that the don't really parse the code in the buffer the same way as for example MS Visual Studio does. Therefore constructs such as the one you have will make Emacs indent wrong. –  Joachim Pileborg Mar 9 '12 at 7:28
    
@Joachim ... while I agree with you based on the above experience about the emacs C mode being stupid in some cases (as it butchers my valid syntax but accepts the alternative equivalent syntax proposed by Jens below). That said, the code I'm formatting was done by a colleague in VS and the formatting is atrocious tab-wise. Emacs may not handle everything properly, but at least its formatting is kind to narrow-default width, lightweight Linux style editors, in my experience -- better than VS in that regard. –  Jason R. Mick Mar 9 '12 at 7:35

1 Answer 1

I think the problem is in the logic of your code. Logically you have different parameters in a function parameter list. The closing parenthesis should not be part of the conditional.

 MyFunc<<<Blk,Thr>>>(
                      Stuff1,
 #ifdef DEBUG_FUNC1
                      Stuff2,
                      dev_Debug
 #else
                      Stuff2
 #endif
                      );

Or alternatively you should have two complete versions of the prototype that are chosen according to your debug macro. Everthing else is not only difficult to parse for emacs (or probably any other editor) but also for the poor human that comes after you.

What you want is not possible since the indentation level of a code might depend on the macros:

#if A
(
#endif
something
#if B
)
#endif

where A and B are the same for all valid compilations. Emacs can't know without assuming values for A and B, how to indent.

share|improve this answer
    
My code is syntactically correct and compiles... it may be bad form, but I include a ); cap on each closing arg-set. Without turning this into a debate about coding standards, why can't elisp handle it if it's syntactically correct. –  Jason R. Mick Mar 9 '12 at 7:28
    
See the simple C example above if you don't believe me about the syntax working. Now, your solution does work, but I'd like to try to get an answer as to why emacs c handler butchers my alternative, but valid syntax and how to prevent that... until I get that answer this question remains open out of principle, but I'm rating you up as I'm using your solution as a work-around. ;) –  Jason R. Mick Mar 9 '12 at 7:30
    
@Jason, because elisp is lisp. Its parser is deeply dependent of scanning for closing parenthesis (in a broad sense). C is different, it parses the code in phases and syntactically replaces (or eliminates) parts of text. Somehow you want to have the identation of the code for any possible value of the preprocessor macros. For a given blob, there is no guarantee that the indentation computed that way is even something unique. –  Jens Gustedt Mar 9 '12 at 7:35
1  
@Jason: edits are reviewed by users with privilege to view the suggested edits queue. Your edit was rejected by two people: stackoverflow.com/suggested-edits/217376 (I also cast a reject vote but I was too late -- the other two beat me to it). Don't try to reply to questions or answers through edits; the original wiki used that approach, and it made the entire site unreadable for all except the authors. Your edit would make more sense as an edit to your question. –  sarnold Mar 9 '12 at 10:16
1  
Once you have edited your question, you may comment on people's answers to alert them of the edit. –  sarnold Mar 9 '12 at 10:16

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