Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a background thread:

class Queue
{
public:
  Message* WaitForMessage(uint32_t uTimeOutMS);

private:
  SignalObject soMessage; // Signalled when a message is added to the queue
};

class MyThread : Thread
{
public:
  bool IsToStop() const { return soStop.IsSignalled(); }

  void ThreadFunction()
  {
     while (!IsToStop()) {
        Message* pMessage = queue1.GetMessage();
        if (pMessage != nullptr) ProcessMessage(pMessage);

        pMessage = queue2.GetMessage();
        if (pMessage != nullptr) ProcessMessage(pMessage);

        Sleep(100); etal // If I wait for 1 ms I hog the CPU, if I wait for 100 ms I waste time when the thread should be stopped
     };
  }

private:
  SignalObject soStop; // Signalled when the thread should stop

  Queue queue1;
  Queue queue2;
};

I would like to get rid of the Sleep and just wait on the signal objects at the same time (This should free up some CPU while I wait for the signal objects). I could make them the signal objects on the Queue public and then do something like this:

while (true) {
  WaitForSignalObjectsForever(soStop, queue1.soMessage, queue2.soMessage); // Returns after any signal object is signalled
  if (IsToStop()) break;

  Message* pMessage = queue1.GetMessage();
  if (pMessage != nullptr) ProcessMessage(pMessage);

  pMessage = queue2.GetMessage();
  if (pMessage != nullptr) ProcessMessage(pMessage);
}

or this:

while (true) {
  soStop.WaitForSignalObjectsForever(queue1.soMessage, queue2.soMessage); // Returns after any signal object is signalled
  if (IsToStop()) break;

  Message* pMessage = queue1.GetMessage();
  if (pMessage != nullptr) ProcessMessage(pMessage);

  pMessage = queue2.GetMessage();
  if (pMessage != nullptr) ProcessMessage(pMessage);
}

or this:

while (WaitForSignalObjectsOrIsToStopForever(queue2.soMessage, queue1.soMessage)) { // Returns true if soStop is signalled, false if one of the other signal objects was signalled
  Message* pMessage = queue1.GetMessage();
  if (pMessage != nullptr) ProcessMessage(pMessage);

  pMessage = queue2.GetMessage();
  if (pMessage != nullptr) ProcessMessage(pMessage);
}

I think I prefer the first version because it is more generic. I still feel icky about making the signal objects public (Or protected with friend access) though. Does any one have a better solution?

Also I am used to calling them signal objects, is there a more common name for them?

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

in windows you have WaitForMultipleObjects, you could write something like this ( in pseudo code )

while (!gotallmessages())
     WaitForMultipleObjects( {queue1.signal, queue2.signal} )

another solution would be to create several threads for monitoring the queue's:

void queuemonitor(master*m, Queue *q)
{
     msg= q->GetMessage();
     m->notify();
}

and in the master thread do something like this: ( using condition + mutex from boost/thread.hpp )

condition cond;
mutex  mtx;

void notify(int id)
{
     scoped_lock l(mtx);
     notifycount++;
     cond.notify_one();
}

void masterthread()
{
     scoped_lock l(mtx);
     while (notifycount<2)
         cond.wait(l);

     // ... this is what we waited for
}
share|improve this answer
    
I was thinking of WaitForMultipleObjects but unfortunately I am using Boost which doesn't wrap this as it isn't portable to pthreads and I would like to keep it portable. I think two more threads is the best option for me and they can signal this waiting thread when something happens to either thread. –  pilkch Mar 9 '12 at 21:41
add comment

The best way would be if the receiver is responsible for the queue, so it only has to wait for messages on one queue and the reference is passed to whoever has to pass a message. Even better would be to hide the message sending, so client threads just call a function and that function sends a message.

If that is not possible, I would join a signal (condition variable?) by passing it to the constructor so senders can signal and also to the thread, so it can be signalled to check its queues.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.