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[CentOS, BASH, cron] Is there a method to declare variants that would keep even when system restarts?

The scenario is to snmpwalk interface I/O errors and store the values in an array. A cron job to snmpwalk again, say 5 mins later, would have another set of values. I would like to compare them with previous corresponding value of each interface. If the difference exceeds the threshold (50), an alert would generate.

So the question is: how to store an array variable that would lost in the system? and how to check the difference of each value in two arrays?


UPDATE Mar 16, 2012 I attach my final script here for your reference.

#!/bin/bash
# This script is to monitor interface Input/Output Errors of Cisco devices, by snmpwalk the error values every 5 mins, and send email alert if incremental value exceeds threshold (e.g. 500).
# Author: Wu Yajun | Created: 12Mar2012 | Updated: 16Mar2012
##########################################################################

DIR="$( cd "$( dirname "$0" )" && pwd )"
host=device.ip.addr.here

# Check and initiate .log file storing previous values, create .tmp file storing current values.
test -e $DIR/host1_ifInErrors.log || snmpwalk -c public -v 1 $host IF-MIB::ifInErrors > $DIR/host1_ifInErrors.log
snmpwalk -c public -v 1 $host IF-MIB::ifInErrors > $DIR/host1_ifInErrors.tmp

# Compare differences of the error values, and alert if diff exceeds threshold.
# To exclude checking some interfaces, e.g. Fa0/6, Fa0/10, Fa0/11, change the below "for loop" to style as:
# for i in {1..6} {8..10} {13..26}
totalIfNumber=$(echo $(wc -l $DIR/host1_ifInErrors.tmp) | sed 's/ \/root.*$//g')

for (( i=1; i<=$totalIfNumber; i++))
do
        currentValue=$(cat $DIR/host1_ifInErrors.tmp | sed -n ''$i'p' | sed 's/^.*Counter32: //g')
        previousValue=$(cat $DIR/host1_ifInErrors.log | sed -n ''$i'p' | sed 's/^.*Counter32: //g')
        diff=$(($currentValue-$previousValue))
        [ $diff -ge 500 ] && (ifName=$(echo $(snmpwalk -c public -v 1 $host IF-MIB::ifName.$i) | sed 's/^.*STRING: //g') ; echo "ATTENTION - Input Error detected from host1 interface $ifName" | mutt -s "ATTENTION - Input Error detected from host1 interface $ifName" <email address here>)
done

# Store current values for next time checking.
snmpwalk -c public -v 1 $host IF-MIB::ifInErrors > $DIR/host1_ifInErrors.log
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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Save the variables in a file. Add a date stamp:

echo "$(date)#... variables here ...." >> "$file"

Read the last values from the file:

tail -1 "$file" | cut "-d#" -f2 | read ... variables here ....

That also gives you a nice log file where you can monitor the changes. I suggest to always append to the file, so you can easily see when the service is down/didn't run for some reason.

To check for changes, you can use an simple if

if [[ "...old values..." != "...new values..." ]]; then
    send mail
fi
share|improve this answer
    
This method reminds me of SQLite. –  beicha Mar 9 '12 at 9:52
    
An SQL database is another option which gives you more features at the cost of extra complexity. But in the end, you need to save the data to disk somehow. If you use a text file or an SQL data file is a question of design. –  Aaron Digulla Mar 9 '12 at 9:59
    
As for my task, actually the difference between last_updated_value and current_value matters. I am still looking for the answer how to declare a variable that could keep in the system. I heard of something like "environmental variables VS local variables", but not sure what's inside. Appreciate your advice. –  beicha Mar 9 '12 at 10:09
    
I answered that in the first sentence: "Save the variables in a file" Variables are always only kept in memory. "environmen" variables are exported to child processes while "local" aren't. No variable survives the termination of the process in which it was created. –  Aaron Digulla Mar 9 '12 at 10:12
    
I see, so values MUST be saved somewhere locally. I would choose between log file and SQLite then. Thanks! –  beicha Mar 9 '12 at 10:22

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