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wondering what the the best way to achieve something is.

To summarise, I have a form that I load by ajax which I use for to both update and insert new rows into a database. To determine whether it is an update or an insert I use the below code (updated forms use the mysql query to populate the form fields).

My code seems sloppy and not best practice. Are there any other suggestion on what would be the best way to do this?

<? 
require_once("config.php");

$insert = false;
$update = false;
$targID = 0;

if(isset($_POST['targID'])){
$targID =  $_POST['targID'];
$targRow = mysql_fetch_array(mysql_query("select * from events where eventid=$targID"));
$update = true;
}else{
$insert = true;
}

?>
<script type="text/javascript">
    var insert = <? echo $insert; ?>+0;
    var update = <? echo $update; ?>+0;

    ......javascript button events, validation etc based on inssert/update
</script>
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3 Answers 3

You already know in the client whether it is an update or an insert, by the fact that you send or do not send the POST data item. So I would write JS in the original page to control the submit and what to do with the data that is sent back. It's difficult to write code without seeing the rest of the page, but at pseudo-code level, you could do the following:

  1. use onsubmit() to catch original submit action
  2. look to see if targID provided
  3. if yes, send update request to server. When row data comes back, fill out form details and display form (you can 'show' a hidden DIV containing the form, for example)
  4. if no - do you need to send anything? - just reveal an empty form (again, show a previously hidden DIV)

Hope this is useful in some way.

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and just to add this: NEVER use form data straight away in an SQL query - that's now SQL injection attacks happen. Make sure you sanitize the data first. –  msgmash.com Mar 9 '12 at 9:57

You should use native mySQL:

INSERT ... ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE

See: http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/insert-on-duplicate.html

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What's the point in determining that on the client side? Does it make any difference?

For the server side I'd use $targID passed from the hidden field. if it's greater than zero - update, otherwise - insert.

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