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I'm having problems with Script#. I got a ASP.NET page which loads a JavaScript file and uses a object from there.

var tracker = Piwik.getTracker(...);

Now I also have a Script# generated JavaScript file which is also included in that same page. Now I want to use the tracker object in that Script# .cs file.

Type.InvokeMethod(tracker, "trackPageView");

Doesn't compile: does not exist in the current context

Type.InvokeMethod("tracker", "trackPageView");

Compiles but outputs: 'tracker'.trackPageView();

Any ideas?

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2 Answers 2

When trying to emit code for a 3rd party javascript library, using Script.Literal will work but usually should be avoided. The whole point of using Script# is so you get compiler support, and easy refactoring.

I would recommend creating some new classes in your Script# library or even a separate Script# Import library if you plan to use Piwik in other projects.

The key is to mark these classes with the attribute [Imported] - This attribute will prevent the creation of a js file for the classes but will give you all the strong typing and refactoring goodness that makes script# so wonderful.

I'm not sure what "Piwik" is but I'll assume it's a Singleton object in the javascript library. Create the following two classes.

[Imported]//we don't want this to show up in the javascript source.
public sealed class Tracker
{
    public void TrackElement()//this will write trackElement() in emitted js.
    {

    }


}


[Imported]//we don't want this to show up in the javascript source.
public static class Piwik
{
    public static Tracker GetTracker(string item)//this becomes getTracker()
    {
        return null;
    }


}

You'll now be able to write code like this in Script#

Tracker tracker = Piwik.GetTracker("whatever");//c#

It will emit javascript that looks like this.

var tracker = Piwik.getTracker('whatever');//javascript
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Fantastic approach, well done. –  Zoidberg Mar 20 '12 at 18:16
up vote -1 down vote accepted

Already found it: Script.Literal("tracker.trackPageView()");

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Script.Literal is the last resort... and really a temporary workaround, since you're loosing a lot of the benefits of writing in c#. Marking this down as there is a better answer showing how to write the import definition than this, which is the accepted answer. –  nikhilk May 22 '12 at 21:31

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