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I tried this piece of code on ideone.com, it complies, but I can't explain what is happening, any help would be great:)

here is the code:

#include <stdio.h>


typedef union {
    unsigned char*       g_pointer;
    struct {
        unsigned short         local_addr;
        unsigned char           globle_page;
        } g_l;
    } Gld_WordType;


int main()
{
    int Idx;
    Gld_WordType test;
    test.g_l.globle_page = 0x13;
    test.g_l.local_addr  = 0xfff0;  

    printf("g_pointer: %x\n
            local_addr: %x\n
            globle_page: %x\n",
            test.g_pointer,
            test.g_l.local_addr,
            test.g_l.globle_page);

    test.g_pointer++;     

    printf("g_pointer: %x\n
            local_addr: %x\n
            globle_page: %x\n",
            test.g_pointer,
            test.g_l.local_addr,
            test.g_l.globle_page);

  return 0;
}

The result is:

g_pointer: 13fff0
local_addr: fff0
globle_page: 13
g_pointer: 13fff1
local_addr: fff1
globle_page: 13

And if I simply switch the order of local_addr and globle_page, the result turns out to be diffrent:

typedef union {
    unsigned char*       g_pointer;
    struct {
        unsigned char          globle_page; // Changed order here.
        unsigned short         local_addr; // And here
        } g_l;
} Gld_WordType;

this time, the result is:

g_pointer: fff00013
local_addr: fff0
globle_page: 13
g_pointer: fff00014
local_addr: fff0
globle_page: 14

OK, here is my understanding of this problem till now, if there are any fault, please point it out.

1st, the union is made up like this in the first example(which the local_addr in in front of globle_page)

############  #############
#          #  #           #
# g_pointer#  # local_addr#
#          #  # MSB or LSB#
############  #############
              #############
              #           #
              # local_addr#
              # MSB or LSB#
              #############
              ##############
              #            #
              # globle_page#
              #            #
              ##############

and the layout is like this if the globle_page is defined before local_addr:

############  ##############
#          #  #            #
# g_pointer#  # globle_page#
#          #  #            #
############  ##############
              ##############
              #            #
              # local_addr #
              # MSB or LSB #
              ##############
              ##############
              #            #
              # local_addr #
              # MSB or LSB #
              ##############

so in situation 1(local_addr defined before globle_page), if g_pointer's value chages, local_addr's MSB or LSB will change too, but why is it actually adding one? because I know my platform is Big-Endian byte order, so local_addr's MSB should be changed, why is the LSB changed?

in situation 2(globle_page defined before local_addr), I can explain that g_pointer's value adds one, and the corresponding address of `globle_page' adds one too, but because of situation 1, I'm not pretty sure of this.

could anyone tell me the exact answer of what is happening here? sorry of my poor English if I did not describe the question properly.

btw, the platform I'm using has no byte align problem. so the sturct is layout as it written, byte by byte.

Best Regards, Sheng Yun

share|improve this question
    
Where's the problem? Unions are LSB-aligned as per requirement so adding 1 to one of them also adds 1 to any other, the alignment of the members of the struct is actually implementation-specific, but the compiler chose to do the obvious thing just like in your pictures with the exception that the unsigned char in the second example is actually an unsigned char plus 1 unsigned char padding. –  hroptatyr Mar 9 '12 at 10:52
2  
It looks like standard little-endian behavior. What is your platform? How do you know it's big-endian? –  Banthar Mar 9 '12 at 10:52
    
@Banthar Doing Embended C programming, using cosmic complier, and the microchip we are using said it's byte order is Big-Endian –  shengy Mar 9 '12 at 10:56
    
@hroptatyr I can't understand what "Unions are LSB-aligned as per requirement" could you explain the details? –  shengy Mar 9 '12 at 10:57
    
@shengy: nope sorry, it was rubbish what I said, the standard leaves it completely up to the implementation where and how big the members in a struct or union are stored, as long as they fit. –  hroptatyr Mar 9 '12 at 11:08

2 Answers 2

could anyone tell me the exact answer of what is happening here?

The first and most important thing to know is that the results are undefined behavior. You are likely to see different results with different compilers -- and even with the same compiler using different options. The most common alternate behavior is that when you modify one field, the other ones won't change until some time in the future. I've written some test code in the past of the form

// assign to the first field
// print the second field
// print the second field

and the first print shows the former value of the second field, and the second print shows the updated value of the second field.

Until you really learn what you're doing with regards to aliasing and undefined behavior, you should never use unions in this fashion.

The next thing to know is that pointers are rarely 1 byte long. They tend to be 4 or 8 bytes on most modern machines.

The next thing to know about data layout is that sometimes structs are padded. For the struct

struct {
    char a;
    short b;
};

I would think it just as likely that the layout is

<one byte of a>  <unused byte>  <two bytes of b>

as

<one byte of a>  <two bytes of b>

and I would be unsurprised to see

<one byte of a>  <3 unused bytes>  <two bytes of b>

In fact, based on your empirical results, I would expect that you have 4-byte pointers, and this last possibility is how the struct is actually laid out.

You can use sizeof and offsetof functions to determine things exactly. sizeof will tell you how many bytes long each of your types are, and offsetof will let you determine exactly where in a structure or union each of its fields begin.

Another point to be aware of is that pointers aren't always laid out like integers. This issue is dependent on the computer architecture you're running on. I think all "common" ones behave as you would expect, though.

share|improve this answer
    
So the point is this question is undefined-behaviour? –  shengy Mar 9 '12 at 11:01
    
It's implementation defined behaviour. –  hroptatyr Mar 9 '12 at 11:12
    
@shengy: That is the most important point. But I was also giving you the information to explain what you were seeing (in particular what you did wrong in your analysis). The most common behaviors you'll see in actual implementations will be that fields will change in the way you expect, but when your program gets the updated values is unpredictable (or quasi-predictable). –  Hurkyl Mar 9 '12 at 12:20
    
hroptatyr has an different opinion with you... and I'm getting confused here. –  shengy Mar 11 '12 at 8:12
    
@shengy: The difference between what the C standard calls implementation-defined and undefined isn't really relevant here (and I could have chosen the wrong phrase) -- in the end, the C standard doesn't guarantee exactly what happens, although a specific compiler vendor may opt to do so (or not). This specific topic is one a lot of compilers leave undefined, though, for the sake of better optimization. –  Hurkyl Mar 11 '12 at 13:48

To investigate, you could add an axtra field to the union to check where the members are located.

typedef union {
    unsigned char*       g_pointer;
    struct {
        unsigned short         local_addr;
        unsigned char           globle_page;
        } g_l;
    unsigned char all[ sizeof (unsigned char*)];
    } Gld_WordType;
share|improve this answer

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