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I have an array of integers: n[].

Also, I have an array (Nr[]) contains n.length integers. I need to generate all combinations of n[] in a following way:

/* let n.length == 3 and Nr[0] = 2, Nr[1] = 3, Nr[2] = 3 */
n = {0, 0, 0};
n = {1, 0, 0};
n = {2, 0, 0};
n = {0, 1, 0};
n = {0, 2, 0};
n = {0, 3, 0};
n = {0, 0, 1};
...
n = {1, 1, 0};
n = {1, 2, 0};
n = {1, 3, 0};
n = {2, 1, 0};
n = {2, 2, 0};
n = {2, 3, 0};
n = {1, 1, 1};
...
n = {0, 1, 1};
// many others

The goal is to find all combinations of n, where n[i] can be 0 to Nr[i].

I did not succeed... How to solve it in Java? Or not in Java...

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where are your codes? and which line do you have problem? –  Kent Mar 9 '12 at 10:49
    
The problem was much bigger, I did not have any good ideas at all( –  Kremchik Mar 9 '12 at 14:51
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1 Answer

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You might want to use recursion, try all possibilities for each index, and recursively invoke with the subarray, "without" the last element.

public static void printPermutations(int[] n, int[] Nr, int idx) {
    if (idx == n.length) {  //stop condition for the recursion [base clause]
        System.out.println(Arrays.toString(n));
        return;
    }
    for (int i = 0; i <= Nr[idx]; i++) { 
        n[idx] = i;
        printPermutations(n, Nr, idx+1); //recursive invokation, for next elements
    }
}

invoke with:

public static void main(String[] args) {
    /* let n.length == 3 and Nr[0] = 2, Nr[1] = 3, Nr[2] = 3 */
    int[] n = new int[3];
    int Nr[] = {2,3,3 };
    printPermutations(n, Nr, 0);
}

will get you:

[0, 0, 0]
[0, 0, 1]
[0, 0, 2]
[0, 0, 3]
[0, 1, 0]
[0, 1, 1]
[0, 1, 2]
[0, 1, 3]
[0, 2, 0]
[0, 2, 1]
[0, 2, 2]
[0, 2, 3]
[0, 3, 0]
[0, 3, 1]
[0, 3, 2]
[0, 3, 3]
[1, 0, 0]
[1, 0, 1]
[1, 0, 2]
[1, 0, 3]
[1, 1, 0]
[1, 1, 1]
[1, 1, 2]
[1, 1, 3]
[1, 2, 0]
[1, 2, 1]
[1, 2, 2]
[1, 2, 3]
[1, 3, 0]
[1, 3, 1]
[1, 3, 2]
[1, 3, 3]
[2, 0, 0]
[2, 0, 1]
[2, 0, 2]
[2, 0, 3]
[2, 1, 0]
[2, 1, 1]
[2, 1, 2]
[2, 1, 3]
[2, 2, 0]
[2, 2, 1]
[2, 2, 2]
[2, 2, 3]
[2, 3, 0]
[2, 3, 1]
[2, 3, 2]
[2, 3, 3]

Note however - that using this method does print all elements as you describes, but in a different order then your example.

share|improve this answer
    
You helped me a lot, thanks! –  Kremchik Mar 9 '12 at 14:49
    
excellent answer, but how could one adapt this to combinations? –  dhomes Jul 1 '12 at 17:28
    
@dhomes: Do you mean something similar to what covered in this thread [this is php and not java, but I provided a pseudo code, which can obviously be implemented in java as well]? Or are you looking for all permutations? –  amit Jul 1 '12 at 17:46
    
all combinations indeed! been trying this on Java (just learning it and I'm so so at recursion) all morning. Been trying to use Arrays.copyOfRange and what not to no avail (p.s.: I'm not a computer / math student). Thanks for replying so fast admit, i thought i wouldn't receive a reply being this thread a few months old –  dhomes Jul 1 '12 at 17:55
    
@dhomes: I hope the linked thread helps you. Try to implement these ideas, and if you are having any troubles - ask your own question, with your specific code, and the problem description - remember that questions with code (even not working) are likely to get much better answers! –  amit Jul 1 '12 at 18:01
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