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I wrote a code that computes the sum of components of an array which is randomly filled with values between 0 and 1. I have to write two functions, one is iterative, and the other one is recursive. Both should do the same work. The two functions I wrote work fine when I call only one at the time. However, if i try to call the two functions in the main, I can see the result of one only, but cannot see the result from the other one. In addition, my recursive function tends to get called one extra time. I have noticed that if I put getch() as comment in recursive_function(). I know I am missing something, but I cannot figure that out. Thanks for your help. here is the code. i am using Dev-C++.

#include <iostream>
#include<conio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

using namespace std;

//headers of the thre functions
int random_value(int array[], int size);
int iterative_function (int array[], int size, int sum);
int recursive_function ( int size, int array[], int index, int sum);



int main()
{     
   int size;int array[size]; int sum=0;
   int index=0;
   cout<<"enter the size of the array"<<endl;
   cin>>size;                //enter the size ofthe array...
   random_value(array, size);
   iterative_function (array, size, sum); 
   recursive_function ( size, array, index, sum);
   getch();
   return 0;
}

int random_value(int array[], int size)
{  cout<<"here is the value returned by rand()"<<endl;
   for(int i=0;i<size;i++)
   { array[i]=( rand() % (0-2));
     cout<<array[i]<<endl;
   }
}

int iterative_function (int array[], int size, int sum)
{
   int i,j, number, value; i=0;
   cout<<"from the iterative function"<<endl;
   cout<<"------"<<endl;
   for(i=0;i<size;i++)
   sum=sum+array[i];
   cout<<"sum of the array="<<sum<<endl;           
   getch();
   return 0;      //exit the function. Program terminated succesfully.
}

int recursive_function ( int size, int array[], int index, int sum)
{
  if(size>index)
  {  
    sum=sum+array[index];
    index++;
    recursive_function( size, array, index, sum); 
  }
  cout<<"from the recursive function"<<endl;
  cout<<"------"<<endl;
  cout<<"new sum= "<< sum<<endl;

  getch();
  return 0;

}
share|improve this question
    
Just a note: You forget to reset the sum variable to zero between calling your two functions. –  Joachim Pileborg Mar 9 '12 at 11:33
    
note: debugger/tracing is your friend... –  Karoly Horvath Mar 9 '12 at 11:35
1  
@KarolyHorvath Note: Unit testing is your friend. –  Peter Wood Mar 9 '12 at 11:51
    
I reset the sum variable to zero, and now, i can have the result of each function. Thanks Joachim. –  T4000 Mar 9 '12 at 11:56
    
@Karoly / Peter - <insert_random_name> wants to be your friend. Accept? Yes/No (sorry, couldn't resist) –  JTeagle Mar 9 '12 at 12:12

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted
#include <iostream>
#include<conio.h>

<conio.h is not a standard header, i.e. it is not available with all compilers, and you don't need it.

To see the result output of your program:

  • run it from the command line, or

  • in Visual Studio run it via keypress [Ctrl F5] (no debugging), or

  • set a breakpoint on the closing brace of main, and run it under a debugger (in Visual Studio e.g. via keypress [F5]).

#include <stdlib.h>

As far as I can see you’re not using anything from this header. However, it does provide the symbolic constants EXIT_SUCCESS and EXIT_FAILURE, which are intended for return statement in main. E.g., it can be more clear to write EXIT_SUCCESS there than to write 0, because many folks misunderstand what 0 means in this context.

using namespace std;

This is OK for a short program or within a namespace.

However, keep in mind that short programs very often end up as not-so-short programs.

And then a using namespace std; can easily cause name collisions, in particular with the name std::distance.

//headers of the thre functions
int random_value(int array[], int size);
int iterative_function (int array[], int size, int sum);
int recursive_function ( int size, int array[], int index, int sum);

Although it is partly a matter of preference, there is no advantage in forward-declaring the functions before main, it is more work, and it sometimes causes problems when the forward declarations don’t quite match the definitions – as with any unnecessary redundancy, violations of the DRY principle (Don’t Repeat Yourself).

Instead, just place the function definitions before main.

That way it is also much easier to see what refers to what, because functions that are used by others then necessarily come before those other functions.

int main()
{     
   int size;int array[size]; int sum=0;

This should not compile, because in C++ only a dynamically allocated array can have a size that is unknown at compile time.

However, C99 supports “variable length arrays” a.k.a. VLAs with the above syntax, and as a language extension the g++ compiler supports that.

On the third and gripping hand, even with the g++ language extension the above declares an array of indeterminate length, because the size variable has not been initialized and has an indeterminate value.

With the g++ compiler that value is most likely 0, but it can easily be any other value.

To turn off the g++ VLA language extension, and some other language extensions, use the following g++ options:

-pedantic -std=c++0x -Wall

For standard C++, instead of a C99 VLA you should use a C++ std::vector<int>.

In order to get a declaration of the std::vector class template, include the standard library header <vector>.

   int index=0;
   cout<<"enter the size of the array"<<endl;
   cin>>size;                //enter the size ofthe array...

When you're using a std::vector, then here, knowing its size, would be the place to declare that vector.

Or, if declared earlier, here would be the place to resize it.

   random_value(array, size);

This would better be a function that returned a vector of random values.

You would then use that to initialize the declared vector.

   iterative_function (array, size, sum); 
   recursive_function ( size, array, index, sum);
   getch();

Regarding the getch() call, see the above comments about <conio.h>.

   return 0;

Regarding the value 0 here, see the above comments about <stdlib.h>.

}

int random_value(int array[], int size)
{  cout<<"here is the value returned by rand()"<<endl;
   for(int i=0;i<size;i++)
   { array[i]=( rand() % (0-2));

Here you have Undefined Behavior, accessing elements of a possibly zero-size array.

     cout<<array[i]<<endl;
   }
}

int iterative_function (int array[], int size, int sum)
{
   int i,j, number, value; i=0;
   cout<<"from the iterative function"<<endl;
   cout<<"------"<<endl;
   for(i=0;i<size;i++)
   sum=sum+array[i];

Here you are again invoking Undefined Behavior, often called just “UB”, by accessing non-existing array elements.

In addition, even if the array had been of non-zero size, it has not been initialized and so would contain just zeroes or arbitrary values (by the Holy Standard called “indeterminate values”).

   cout<<"sum of the array="<<sum<<endl;           
   getch();

See the above comment about <conio.h>.

   return 0;      //exit the function. Program terminated succesfully.
}

There is no point in letting the above function always return the same value. From an information-theoretical perspective, that return value carries zero bits of information. Instead just let the function’s result value be void.

int recursive_function ( int size, int array[], int index, int sum)
{
  if(size>index)
  {  
    sum=sum+array[index];
    index++;
    recursive_function( size, array, index, sum); 
  }

Instead of incrementing the index, which is non-idiomatic and therefore difficult to spot for experienced readers, just use index + 1 in the recursive call.

It is a good idea to add const to just about every declaration where it is possible.

That would, for example, have forced you to use index + 1. :-)

  cout<<"from the recursive function"<<endl;
  cout<<"------"<<endl;
  cout<<"new sum= "<< sum<<endl;

  getch();

See the above comment about <conio.h>.

  return 0;

See the above comment about function always returning the same value.

}

Summing up, with all the Undefined Behavior it is just happenstance if things appear to work.

Fix the UB's (in particular replace C99 VLA with std::vector) first of all, then perhaps ask new question if it still does not work as it should. ;-)

share|improve this answer
    
Ok, I will fix those errors as you suggested. thanks for the deep and great analysis. But I still have the same display multiple times with the recursive function. I can't see what I did wrong, but i know something is not right in my code. Thanks a lot! –  T4000 Mar 9 '12 at 12:35

You create your array using size but it's initialized AFTER that. You simply get random stuffs... Declare int pointer, read size, allocate the array with new then try again (do not forget to delete).

share|improve this answer

First of all the array that you've declared is of unknown size, declare the array after getting input for size

share|improve this answer

Remember that in recursive_function() it calls itself many times - and every time it is called (either by main() or by itself) it will run all commands in its body (since you never return early)... now can you see a problem with the getch() in there?

share|improve this answer
    
I still don't see the problem with getch() in the recursive function. I thought that the if(size>index) in the recursive function should handle that issue by avoiding the recursive function to call itself more than expected. –  T4000 Mar 9 '12 at 12:00
    
It's not that it causes the function to be called more than expected - it's that every time it gets called it waits for a keypress, instead of finishing all of its recursions first and then waiting for one keypress at the end, which is what I suspect you wanted. –  JTeagle Mar 9 '12 at 12:10
    
Exact, but even when I get ride of getch(), i still have the same display multiple times, when actually i would like to have only one display after all the recursions happened. –  T4000 Mar 9 '12 at 12:33
    
Rather than try and display the result from within each function, why not have the functions return the sum, and have the main code display those results? When calling recursive_function() from within itself, you can simply ignore what it returns - it's only the one called by main() that cares what sum it returns. –  JTeagle Mar 9 '12 at 12:36
    
It is a good idea, but the second part of the assignment ask us to measure the difference in execution time of each function. That's why I would like to have the result within each function, then I will compute and compare their execution time. –  T4000 Mar 9 '12 at 12:44

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