Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a method, with have a lot of implicit parameters:

def hello(message:String)(implicit a:A,b:B,c:C, ..., user: User) = {...}

Now consider such a class:

object Users extends Controller {
  implicit a: A = ...
  implicit b: B = ...
  ...

  def index(id:String) = Action {
     User.findById(id) match {
       case Some(user) => {
          implicit val _user = user
          hello("implicit")
       }
       case _ => BadRequest
     }
  }
}

You can see this line in the above sample:

implicit val _user = user

It exists just to make the object user as an implicit object. Otherwise, I have to call hello as:

hello("implicit")(a,b,c,... user)

I'm thinking if there is any way to improve the code, e.g. we don't need to define that _user variable but make the user is implicit.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Yes, there is a way to eliminate _user variable while making user implicit:

def index(id:String) = Action {
  User.findById(id) map (implicit user => hello("implicit")) getOrElse BadRequest
}

UPDATE: Addressing your question about many cases in the comments below.

It all depends what value type is returned by User.findById. If it's Option[User] but you want to match on specific users (assuming User is a case class), then the original solution still applies:

def index(id:String) = Action {
  User.findById(id) map { implicit user =>
    user match {
      case User("bob") => hello("Bob")
      case User("alice") => hello("Alice")
      case User("john") => hello("John")
      case _ => hello("Other user")
    }
  } getOrElse BadRequest

Or you can match on anything else if you want, as long as User.findById is String => Option[User]

If, on the other hand, User.findById is String => User then you can simply define a helper object like:

object withUser {
  def apply[A](user: User)(block: User => A) = block(user)
}

And use it as follows (again assuming User is a case class):

def index(id: String) = Action {
  withUser(User findById id) { implicit user =>
    user match {
      case User("bob") => hello("Bob")
      case User("alice") => hello("Alice")
      case User("john") => hello("John")
      case _ => BadRequest
    }
  }
}

or matching on some other value, say an Int:

def index(id: String, level: Int) = Action {
  withUser(User findById id) { implicit user =>
    level match {
      case 1 => hello("Number One")
      case 2 => hello("Number Two")
      case 3 => hello("Number Three")
      case _ => BadRequest
    }
  }
}

I hope this covers all the scenarios you may have.

share|improve this answer
    
+1, it's a good solution if pattern match an Option. But what if there are many cases? –  Freewind Mar 10 '12 at 3:38
    
@Freewind. I've updated my answer to cover many cases. –  romusz Mar 10 '12 at 19:50

I know of no trick such as case Some(implicit user) but what about

def hello(message: String, user: User)(implicit a: A, ... z: Z) = ...
def hello(message: String)(implicit a: A, ... z: Z, user: User) = hello(message, user)

case Some(user) => hello("implicit", user)
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. I think hello(message)(implicit ...) should be the existing one and can't be changed, otherwise we don't need to define it, just define a hello(message,user)(implicit ...) on is enough. –  Freewind Mar 9 '12 at 13:06

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.