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I want to create a multilne variable that will be split over several-lines, indenting on each new line (without the indents being displayed). I have tried several ways:

function regprompt {
    case "$TERM" in
        xterm*)
            PS1=$(cat <<-EOF
                    ${blue} \u ${txtrst}on ${cyan}\h${white}\$gitps1 ${blue}\${fill} \
                    ${undgrn}\d \D{%r} ${blue}\
                    \n[ ${yellow}\$newPWD ${blue}] ${txtrst}$ ${blue}
EOF
)
        ;;
        linux*)
            PS1="${green} \u ${txtrst}on ${cyan}\h${white}\$gitps1 ${green}\${fill} \
                 ${undgrn}\d \D{%r} ${green}\
                 \n[ ${yellow}\$newPWD ${green}] ${txtrst}$ ${green}"
        ;;
        screen*)
            PS1="${green} \u ${txtrst}on ${cyan}\h${white}\$gitps1 ${green}\${fill} \
${undgrn}\d \D{%r} ${green}\
                 \n[ ${yellow}\$newPWD ${green}] ${txtrst}$ ${green}"
        ;;
    esac
}

The first option shows the date part (\d \D{%r}) indented, which I only want to show one space (the one before the escape). Everything else on it shows correctly. The second option does the same. The screen option will display correctly, I just want to know if there is a way to keep it organized?

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1 Answer

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If your variables do not need to contain tabs, you can use the single quote (which allows newlines), indent with tabs, and then remove tabs using tr. For example:

var='ab
        cd
                        ef
gh
        ij'
var=$(echo "$var" | tr -d '\t')
echo "$var"

Note that the indentations must be tabs, not spaces for this to work. Unfortunately I don't know how to indicate this in the formatting. This trick will work in a script, but in an interactive shell entering tabs may not be possible because tab is used by readline for tab-completion. If leading spaces do not need to occur in your variable, you could also use spaces, and instead of tr -d '\t' use something like sed -e 's/^ \+//'.

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worked wonderfully! Thanks, was a pain trying to sort this, should of asked here first; Guess its time to start learning sed and tr and the like :|. –  bluTaz Mar 9 '12 at 14:01
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