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I am building a forum for an application and I am stuck trying to get the latest poster on a discussion. The database I am using is Oracle.

I have the following tables:

discussions
    id 
    course_id
    user_id
    title
    stub
    created_at

threads
   id
   discussion_id
   user_id
   created_at
   updated_at
   message

 discussion_views
     discussion_id
     user_id
     time

 users
     id
     username

And I have the following query:

select discussions.created_at, 
       discussions.title, 
       users.username, 
       count(threads.id) AS "replies", 
       count(distinct discussion_views.discussion_id) AS "views" 
 from discussions
 left join threads on discussions.id=threads.discussion_id
 left join discussion_views on discussions.id=discussion_views.discussion_id
 join users on users.id=discussions.user_id
 group by discussions.created_at, discussions.title, users.username
 order by discussions.created_at desc

What I need is to get the last user who posted in a thread and the date. Should I make an inner insert, a join or should I make another insert. I also want my query to be performant because my forum will need to handle a lot of traffic.

share|improve this question
    
You have asked for the date of the last user who posted in a thread, but your threads table doesn't have a date on it. Also, your "views" count will always return 1 (where there have been any views), because for a given discussion there will only ever be one distinct discussion_id - does discussion_views have its own unique id column? –  Mark Bannister Mar 9 '12 at 12:06

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try:

select * from
(select discussions.created_at, 
        discussions.title, 
        users.username as discussion_created_by, 
        count(distinct threads.id) over (partition by discussions.created_at, 
                                                      discussions.title, 
                                                      users.username) AS replies, 
        count(distinct discussion_views.time) 
             over (partition by discussions.created_at, 
                                discussions.title, 
                                users.username) AS "views",
        threads.user_id AS latest_post_by,
        threads.updated_at AS latest_post_at,
        row_number() over (partition by discussions.created_at, 
                                        discussions.title, 
                                        users.username
                           order by threads.id desc) AS rn
 from discussions
 left join threads on discussions.id=threads.discussion_id
 left join discussion_views on discussions.id=discussion_views.discussion_id
 join users on users.id=discussions.user_id) sq
where rn=1
order by created_at desc
share|improve this answer
    
it is not working...here is the error ORA-00923: FROM keyword not found where expected –  Mythriel Mar 9 '12 at 12:28
    
@Mythriel: Due to a missing comma after "views", now corrected. I notice that although you have updated the table structures, you haven't added a unique ID to discussion_views, so I have amended the query to use time instead. Try the updated query. –  Mark Bannister Mar 9 '12 at 12:51
    
can u explain pls a little the query..i get strange data for latest post by, i mean i get nothing even tho i have data for it –  Mythriel Mar 9 '12 at 12:59
    
i have a mysql background, this is my first application using oracle –  Mythriel Mar 9 '12 at 13:06
    
@Mythriel: What do you want explaining? If latest_post_by and latest_post_at are both null, this probably means that there no threads for that discussion, while if latest_post_by is null but latest_post_at has a value then it probably means that the user_id is null on the latest thread for the discussion. –  Mark Bannister Mar 9 '12 at 13:09

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