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I'm creating a class in Python, which then has some nested classes added using setattr().

class T( object ):
    def __init__( self ):
        cDict = {}
        cDict['__doc__'] = 'Inner class doc string'
        setattr( self, 'C', type('C', (), cDict ) )

However, calling help( T ) does not then include and information about C. Constructing a T, and then a C within it, works fine.

Doing this the traditional way works fine:

class T2( object ): 
    class C2( object ):
        __doc__ = 'Inner class doc string'

Calling help( T2 ) displays information about C2.

Can somebody shed some light on what's happening here? Thanks.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The two snippets you showed are not equivalent.

This:

class T( object ):
    def __init__( self ):
        cDict = {}
        cDict['__doc__'] = 'Inner class doc string'
        setattr( self, 'C', type('C', (), cDict ) )

will set a C attribute on each T instance:

>>> T.C
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
AttributeError: type object 'T' has no attribute 'C'
>>> t = T()
>>> t.C
<class '__main__.C'>

This is because you placed the setattr inside __init__.

While this:

class T2( object ): 
    class C2( object ):
        __doc__ = 'Inner class doc string'

will add an attribute on T2 itself:

>>> T2.C2
<class '__main__.C2'>
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help operates on classes and types, rather than objects. However, your T only has the member C in objects (when __init__ has been run). So help can't detect it.

Your T2 also contains C2 in the class itself, so help detects it and displays the correct information.

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The first way causes C to be an instance attribute of each T object.

The second way causes C to be a class attribute of the T class.

help(T) provides help on the T class (well, the object that the name T refers to, which in this case is a class). It can't know anything about any given instance of T, even if it's true for every instance (and it might not be, anyway; later code could do my_T = T(); del my_T.C).

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