Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want all neighbors of a point coordinate in a matrix at a distance d from it along with that point.

What is the most efficient way to generate such a sub-matrix ?

For example if A = [ 1 , 2 , 3 ; 4 , 5 , 6 ; 7 ,8 ,9]

then for d = 0 and data 5 i would get the answer as 5 but for d = 1 i will get the matrix A as the result since the size of A itself is 3X3.

At the same time if the index does not exist in the matrix then i should get 0 at that point.

so for data point 2 and d = 1 the answer would be [ 0 , 0 , 0 ; 1 , 2 ,3 ; 4 , 5 , 6]

How can i do it ?

share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try this out ...

A = padarray( A , [d d] )
% assuming the data is at r row and c col do the following

A( r : r + 2d , c : c + 2 d )

I hope it works ... did'nt really check !!

share|improve this answer
    
octave does not know padarray :-( but nice if it works so compact –  Kyss Tao Mar 9 '12 at 18:38
add comment

Here's a solution. I'll leave you to turn it into a function. Let n denote the value at the centre of your sub-array, which is 5 in your example.

z = zeros(size(A,1)+2*d,size(A,2)+2*d);
z(d+1:d+size(A,1),d+1:d+size(A,2)) = A;
[r,c] = find(z==n);
z(r-d:r+d,c-d:c+d)

EDIT

Try this version, which is as inadequately tested as my earlier attempt. This still won't cope if the find expression returns multiple locations.

And I still make no warranties as to the efficiency of this.

share|improve this answer
    
case n=2,d=1, (=> r=1) gives r-d=0 => zero subindex –  Kyss Tao Mar 9 '12 at 15:05
    
Ahh, so I got it wrong. –  High Performance Mark Mar 9 '12 at 15:07
    
It is incorrect... i can assume that i know r,c but it is still giving me wrong answer in terms of neighbours –  anon Mar 9 '12 at 16:43
    
I took the following matrix 'A = [ 1 , 2,3,4;5,6,7,8;9,10,11,12;13,14,15,16]' and gave r = 2 and c=2 with d = 1 ... it returns me ' 0 0 0 ; 0 1 2 ; 0 5 6' –  anon Mar 9 '12 at 16:49
    
So, now over to you to fix either my offering or @Kyss's. –  High Performance Mark Mar 9 '12 at 16:54
add comment

To start with the case that you are inside A, instead of giving d=0 and data_point=5 you should give data_point=[2,2]. If you have it given as 5 you can convert by

ij = [ceil(data_point/size(A,1)), rem(data_point-1, size(A,1))+1]

or use find, as in High's answer, depending how to interpret your question.

The following function

function B = find_neigh(A,ij,d)
imin = max(ij(1)-d,1);
imax = min(ij(1)+d,size(A,1));
jmin = max(ij(2)-d,1);
jmax = min(ij(2)+d,size(A,2));
B = zeros(2*d+1,2*d+1);
r1 = max(2-ij(1)+d,1);
c1 = max(2-ij(2)+d,1);
B(r1:r1+imax-imin, c1:c1+jmax-jmin) = A(imin:imax,jmin:jmax);

should return you the desired result. Call it for example with

A = [1, 2, 3; 4, 5, 6; 7, 8, 9];
find_neigh(A,[1,2],1)

Edit: fixed two, no three bugs, and made it a function

share|improve this answer
    
Ah, so you got it wrong too ! –  High Performance Mark Mar 9 '12 at 15:36
    
you mean with regards to my fixes, or did you find one more mistake? –  Kyss Tao Mar 9 '12 at 15:38
    
No @Kyss, wrt your original post, I've not tested your code at all. Crikey, I've hardly tested mine. –  High Performance Mark Mar 9 '12 at 15:40
    
Could you give a working example ? I can have it as data[2][2] ie i know where the data point is.... The answer given by @ High Performance Mark unfortunately did'nt work.... –  anon Mar 9 '12 at 16:48
    
ok, I put the code into a function now and gave an example how to call it. Save the function as find_neigh.m. Have fun! –  Kyss Tao Mar 9 '12 at 18:31
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.