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I have two files which are in same order and they have the same number of rows:

file1(only 2 columns):

562_201 RIR1
562_202 RIR1
562_203 RIR1
562_204 RIR1
562_205 RIR1
562_206 RIR1
562_207 RIR1
562_208 RIR1
562_209 RIR1
562_210 WR1 
562_211 WR1 
562_212 WR1 

file2 (I should say that file2 has more than million rows!):

562_201 0101
562_202 0101
562_203 0101
562_204 0101
562_205 0101
562_206 0101
562_207 0101
562_208 0101
562_209 0101
562_210 0101
562_211 0101
562_212 0101

and I want to merge them to get:

562_201 RIR1 0101
562_202 RIR1 0101
562_203 RIR1 0101
562_204 RIR1 0101
562_205 RIR1 0101
562_206 RIR1 0101
562_207 RIR1 0101
562_208 RIR1 0101
562_209 RIR1 0101
562_210 WR1  0101
562_211 WR1  0101
562_212 WR1  0101

thanks!

share|improve this question
    
I have more than million columns may I know how on earth that file is getting created? – anubhava Mar 9 '12 at 14:32
    
it's a snp cheap data – mahmood Mar 9 '12 at 14:36
up vote 9 down vote accepted

You can use join command:

$ join file1.txt file2.txt
share|improve this answer
    
Another +1 for recommending classic unix tools. :) – ghoti Mar 9 '12 at 14:53
    
join requires the files to be sorted on the join fields. if both files are sorted by column 1, you're in luck. – glenn jackman Mar 9 '12 at 15:13

awk

awk 'NR==FNR{a[$1]=$2;next;}gsub($1,$1" "a[$1])' file1 file2
share|improve this answer

I'm not sure, but the join command may load both files into memory. That may be problematic if one of the files is enormous.

This should avoid the problem by only loading the smaller file into an array in memory, then joining data through a pipe.

#!/usr/bin/awk -f

# Load file1 into an array...
BEGIN {
  while (getline < "file1") {
    file1[$1]=$0;
  }
}

{
  key=$1;    # Store the key
  $1="";     # Blank the key (now $0 starts with the field separator)
  print file1[key] $0;
}

Usage:

[ghoti@pc ~/tmp]$ ./join.awk file2
562_201 RIR1 0101
562_202 RIR1 0101
562_203 RIR1 0101
562_204 RIR1 0101
562_205 RIR1 0101
562_206 RIR1 0101
562_207 RIR1 0101
562_208 RIR1 0101
562_209 RIR1 0101
562_210 WR1 0101
562_211 WR1 0101
562_212 WR1 0101
share|improve this answer
1  
You can write that like this: awk 'NR==FNR {file1[$1]=$0; next} {$1=file[$1]; print}' file1 file2. Also you have to hold the entire file1 in memory, so make sure it's not too huge. – glenn jackman Mar 9 '12 at 15:14
    
Nice. I think the expanded version may be a little easier to read and understand, though. :) – ghoti Mar 9 '12 at 15:19
paste file1 file2 | awk '{$3=""; print}'

Explanation:

  1. paste f1 f2 : merge line by lines
  2. $3=""; print : to remove the repeated column
share|improve this answer
    
Always is better if you add a brief explanation of what your code does. – ianaya89 Jan 26 '15 at 20:20
    
@ianaya89: true! lets do it! – JJoao Jan 26 '15 at 21:25

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