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Why does the first calculation perform so much better than the second?

The problem with using the first calculation is that it results in an error when used in a PerformancePoint dashboard chart that is connected to a filter based on the [Supplier].[Supplier Int Ext] user hierarchy...due to the way PerformancePoint builds the MDX query.

MdxScript(Spend Analytics DW) (677, 10) The MDX function CURRENTMEMBER failed because the coordinate for the 'Supplier Int Ext' attribute contains a set.

The problem with using the second version is that performance sucks over large sets...

Calculation v1

IIF(
     [Supplier].[Supplier Int Ext].CurrentMember IS [Supplier].[Supplier Int Ext].&[INTERNAL SUPPLIER]
    ,NULL
    ,SUM(
         [Supplier].[Supplier Int Ext].&[EXTERNAL SUPPLIER]
        ,[Measures].[GL Lines Count]
     )
)

READS, 1280
READ_KB, 51817
WRITES, 0
WRITE_KB, 0
CPU_TIME_MS, 140
ROWS_SCANNED, 904535
ROWS_RETURNED, 13650

Calculation v2

SUM(
    EXISTING {[Supplier].[Supplier Int Ext].&[EXTERNAL SUPPLIER]}
    ,[Measures].[GL Lines Count]
)

** Note, these are the stats after cancelling the query before it finished
READS, 42157
READ_KB, 580617
WRITES, 0
WRITE_KB, 0
CPU_TIME_MS, 1996
ROWS_SCANNED, 11085945
ROWS_RETURNED, 0

The resource stats below each calculation are a result from the following query (which was generated by a user created PowerPivot report).

SELECT 
  NON EMPTY 
    {
    [Measures].[GL Amount USD]
   ,[Measures].[<<calculated measure>>]
    } ON COLUMNS
 ,NON EMPTY 
    {
        [Date].[Calendar Month Text].[Calendar Month Text].ALLMEMBERS*
        [Date].[Calendar Week].[Calendar Week].ALLMEMBERS*
        [Business Unit].[Division Plant].[Plant].ALLMEMBERS*
        [Commodity Class].[Commodity Class Hierarchy].[Commodity Class Sub Category].ALLMEMBERS*
        [Supplier].[Cat Mgmt Rptg Name].[Cat Mgmt Rptg Name].ALLMEMBERS
    }
  DIMENSION PROPERTIES 
    MEMBER_CAPTION
   ,MEMBER_UNIQUE_NAME
   ON ROWS
FROM 
     [<<cube>>]
WHERE 
  (
    [Date].[Calendar Hierarchy].CurrentMember
   ,[Transaction Type].[Transaction Type].&[3]
  )
CELL PROPERTIES 
  VALUE
 ,BACK_COLOR
 ,FORE_COLOR
 ,FORMATTED_VALUE
 ,FORMAT_STRING
 ,FONT_NAME
 ,FONT_SIZE
 ,FONT_FLAGS;
share|improve this question
    
Why don't you define the calculated measure simply as ([Measures].[GL Lines Count], [Supplier].[Supplier Int Ext].&[EXTERNAL SUPPLIER])? – Gonsalu Apr 5 '12 at 11:27
    
That causes confusion to the user when they then try to add the [Supplier].[Supplier Int Ext] attribute hierarchy in other analysis. – Bill Anton Apr 5 '12 at 18:30
    
Can't you define a calculated measure as that tuple for this query specifically? – Gonsalu Apr 5 '12 at 21:21

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