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I want to create an object only if some conditions are applied, otherwise retun nullptr. This is how I would do it in Delphi (2009+):

function GetGen(n : integer) : Generics.Collections.TList<Integer>;
var
i : integer;
begin
  result := nil;
  if n > 0 then begin
      result := Generics.Collections.TList<Integer>.Create;
      for i := 0 to n - 1 do result.Add(i);
  end;
end;

procedure TestGenList(n : integer);
var
   aInt : integer;
   aGen : Generics.Collections.TList<Integer>;
begin
   aGen := GetGen(n);
   if aGen = nil then begin
      WriteLn('No generic created!');
      Exit;
   end;
   WriteLn(Format('Size: %d', [aGen.Count]));
   for aInt in aGen do Write(Format('%d ', [aInt]));
   aGen.Free; //will clear integers
end;

procedure TestGen
begin
    TestGenList(0);
    Readln;
    TestGenList(5);
    Readln;
end.

This is how I could do it in C++ :

unique_ptr<vector<int>> GetUniquePrtVec(int n){
    if (n < 1) return(nullptr); //create only if correct input is given
    unique_ptr<vector<int>> result (new vector<int>);
    for (int i = 0 ; i != n; i++){
        result->push_back(i);
    }
    return(move(result));
}

void TestPtrVec(int n){
    unique_ptr<vector<int>> vec = GetUniquePrtVec(n);
    if (vec == nullptr){
        cout << "No vector created" << endl;
        return;
    }
    cout << endl << vec->size() << endl;
    for_each(vec->begin(), vec->end(), [](int n){cout << n << " " << endl;});
    vec->clear(); //clear vector
    vec.reset(nullptr);
}

void testVec3(){
    TestPtrVec(0);
    TestPtrVec(5);
}

My question is about the right idiom. Would you guys, experienced C++ programmers (for I am a beginner, just learning the language), do it this way? If not, then how would you do it?

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
You don't seem to be a beginner from the C++ code you write ! –  iammilind Mar 9 '12 at 14:48
    
Thanks, I'm beginner in C++, not programming :) To elaborate my dilemma: would you check for a nullptr, or have a vec ptr variable somewhere (in another func) pointing to an empty vector? –  Mihaela Mar 9 '12 at 14:49
2  
This is hard to answer out of context. A function GetUniquePtrVec sounds pretty useless (you can just make the vector at the site where it's needed). Moreover, vector is already a dynamic container class, so it's very unusual to wrap it in an extra layer of dynamic management. Personally, I would make a guess that unsigned integers are a better approach here. –  Kerrek SB Mar 9 '12 at 14:54
1  
It is not necessary to call move on a return value when it is a local variable. –  Benjamin Lindley Mar 9 '12 at 15:07
    
@KerrekSB: yes unsigned int is surely a better approach, sorry :). So you kinda answered my question. I should not use this idiom. –  Mihaela Mar 9 '12 at 15:24

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

IMHO, the best way for your example, would be to simply return the std::vector by value and simply return an empty one if the input is invalid.

std::vector<int> get_vec(int n){
  std::vector<int> ret;
  for(unsigned i=0; i < n; ++i)
    ret.push_back(i);
  return ret; // will be empty for (n < 1)
              // and will be moved if (n >= 1)
}

One thing you need to learn: You don't need to explicitly std::move if you return a local variable. Just return by value. If copy elision is possible, it will do that (RVO / NRVO). If it can't for some reason, it'll first try to move it out before copying it. Note however, that a member of a local variable will not be moved automatically, aka

struct object{ std::vector<int> member; };

std::vector<int> foo(){
  object o;
  // ...
  return o.member; // no move, no copy elision, plain old copy
}

Now, your second function can also be improved and reduced:

void try_vec(int n){
  auto vec = get_vec(n); // will elide copy or simply move
  for(auto& x : vec) // will not loop if vector is empty
    std::cout << x << ' '; // why space and newline?
  std::cout << "\n"; // don't use std::endl, it also flushes the stream
}

And from your original function:

vec->clear(); //clear vector
vec.reset(nullptr);

Is not needed, that's the whole reason for smart pointers and resource managing containers. They will destroy what they own when they go out of scope.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I always clear things in Pascal. Just have to unlearn that, and focus on the scope. –  Mihaela Mar 9 '12 at 15:06

personally I believe that having a pointer to a vector is a bit necessary it looks as to me as if you could just return an empty vector or even throw an invalid argument error. The whole null return value is a bit of a hack and now you have to manage some memory because of it.

I personally would rather see

std::vector<int> get_vec(int n){
    std::vector<int> result;
    if(n < 1) return result;
    result.reserve(n);
    for (int i = 0 ; i != n; i++){
        result.push_back(i);
    }
    return result; 
}

or

std::vector<int> get_vec(int n){
    if(n < 1) throw std::invalid_argument("n must be greater than 1");
    std::vector<int> result;
    result.reserve(n);
    for (int i = 0 ; i != n; i++){
        result.push_back(i);
    }
    return result;
}


void test(int n){
    try{
    std::vector<int> vec = get_vec(n);
    catch(const std::exception& e)
    {
        std::cerr << "No vector created: " << e.what() << std::endl;
        return;
    }

//etc. .  .
share|improve this answer
    
result.reserve(n) a good point, but I wanted to avoid copying. What if I have a vector with 100k elements? Isn't return(result) gonna invoke copy constructor? Or am I getting this wrong? –  Mihaela Mar 9 '12 at 15:01
    
@Mihaela: Yes, as the compiler will first try to move, only if that's not possible it will try to copy. See my answer. –  Xeo Mar 9 '12 at 15:03
    
@Mihaela as you are using move i am assuming you have c++11, in which case it will be moved no copied. this is a very light weight operation such swapping a pointer about. actually putting return std::move(result); is more likely to stop the compiler from making the cherished copy elision optimization. finally return is no a function putting brackets around it is odd. –  111111 Mar 9 '12 at 15:07
    
OK, just tell me if I got this, I should use move almost exclusively when writing my classes (like move constructors). And also assume that the compiler will try to move first always, then copy. How do I know that the move constructor exists, look through the debugger? –  Mihaela Mar 9 '12 at 15:10
    
ermm, not quite, there are times when the compiler know when to move for example in a return (because everything is going to be delete) in these cases just like the var name as is, this is because there is a further optimization that can be made by the compiler and the more code clutter there is the harder it is for the compiler to introduce the optimization. –  111111 Mar 9 '12 at 15:12

Seems what you need is something like boost::optional. Here is an example of its usage:

optional<char> get_async_input()
{
    if ( !queue.empty() )
        return optional<char>(queue.top());
    else return optional<char>(); // uninitialized
}

void receive_async_message()
{
    optional<char> rcv ;
    // The safe boolean conversion from 'rcv' is used here.
    while ( (rcv = get_async_input()) && !timeout() )
        output(*rcv);
}

For more information refer to boost documentation.

share|improve this answer
    
I hear you, but I just wanna work with STL. Thanks. –  Mihaela Mar 9 '12 at 15:02
    
@Mihaela: Boost is the stdlib on steroids. And please don't call the standard library "STL", that part is the name of the container / algorithm / iterator / function objects subpart. –  Xeo Mar 9 '12 at 15:03
    
Sorry, I meant Standard Library, (STL < SL) –  Mihaela Mar 9 '12 at 15:07
    
Just a clarification about my not using Boost. I stared learning C++ less than a month ago, and STL, syntax, language and all that is going on "underneath" is too much to grasp. I want to "get the feel of the language", try to eliminate some of my "old idioms" from OOP Pascal, and do it the C++ way.So Boost would be too much for me to comprehend at the moment. See just how many mistakes I made in my question, design and code-wise. So I will be posting more questions here :) –  Mihaela Mar 9 '12 at 20:24

Use exceptions or type erasure, returning NULL is the C way of doing things, not the C++ way.

Also you use the move semantic but you are not returning an r-value, it would not work like that.

share|improve this answer
1  
Your idea about move semantics is wrong. It would be especially bad if the return type was an rvalue reference. And returning by value is exactly the point where you use move semantics. Also, returning nullptr is perfectly fine in C++, if you must use pointers. Otherwise, boost::optional is also a great candidate. And what would type erasure be needed for here?! –  Xeo Mar 9 '12 at 15:00

Im a little unfamilliar with this syntax, but I think it looks okay to me. Though, why not just use pointers with the usual c+ syntax?

vector<int> GetUniquePrtVec(int n)
{
    if (n < 1) 
        return null;

    vector<int>* result = new vector<int>;
    for (int i = 0 ; i != n; i++){
        result->push_back(i);
    }
    return (result);
}

Though Ive never used a vector pointer. Generally when I create a vector I pass it to a function by reference, like this:

vector<int> myVec;
bool bSuccess = PopulateVec(n, myVec);

vector<int>* PopulateVec(int inNum, vector<int>& inVec)
{
    if (inNum< 1)
        return false;

    for (int i = 0 ; i != inNum; i++)
    {
        inVec->push_back(i);
    }

    // inVec is "returned" by reference
    return true
}
share|improve this answer
    
I think you should look over your code again, as it got several problems. Also, no, owning raw pointers are a friggin bad idea. Don't use them. Use smart pointers, if you have to do dynamic allocation. –  Xeo Mar 9 '12 at 15:07

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