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I use the __FILE__ macro for error messages. However, sometimes the path comes back as E:\x\y\/z.ext. It does this for specific files.

For example, E:\programming\v2\wwwindowclass.h comes back as E:\programming\v2\/wwwindowclass.h and E:\programming\v2\test.cpp comes back as E:\programming\v2\test.cpp. In fact, the only file in the directory that works seems to be test.cpp.

To work around this, I used jmucchiello's answer to this question to replace any occurrence of "/" with "\". This worked fine, and the displayed path changed to a normal one.

The problem was when I tried it on Windows 7 (after using XP). The string came up as (null) after calling the function.

Along with this, I sometimes get some seemingly random error 2: File not found errors. I'm unsure of whether this is related at all, but if there's an explanation, it would be nice to hear.

I've tried to find why __FILE__ would be returning the wrong string, but to no avail. I'm using GNU g++ 4.6.1. I'm not actually sure yet if the paths that were wrong in XP were wrong in Windows 7 too. Any insight is appreciated.

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It is not returning the wrong string, it is just that this is one of the many implementation defined ways to deal with this. Often stuff needs \\ to escape \ properly, read the documentation for your OS on how it expects path names for the functionality it needs –  PlasmaHH Mar 9 '12 at 14:54
    
But the true path being returned is E:\\programming\\v2\\/wwwindowclass.h. I don't see the use for that extra /. And why would it do that for most files, but not test.cpp? –  chris Mar 9 '12 at 15:03
    
@chris: Typically, the compiler does so when you pass #include "v2/wwwindowclass.h" to the compiler. Since every file has its own include statements, you can (but shouldn't) mix the two styles. –  MSalters Mar 9 '12 at 15:27
    
Ahhh, I see exactly what you mean now. My compiler just puts /file.ext on the end. I include my files like #include "wwwindowclass.h" and by default it puts in that slash. If I say #include ".\wwwindowclass.h" it shows up as a\b\c\/.\wwwindowclass.h. Would you make the compiler adding that slash onto the include into an answer? –  chris Mar 9 '12 at 18:51

2 Answers 2

The function in the linked question appears to return NULL if there are no changes to make. Probably Windows 7 doesn't suffer from the \/ problem (in some cases).

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Oh, that one's my bad then. I didn't notice that point. –  chris Mar 9 '12 at 15:01
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As per MSalters's comment:

Typically, the compiler does so when you pass #include "v2/wwwindowclass.h" to the compiler. 
Since every file has its own include statements, you can (but shouldn't) mix the two styles.

This was the case. My compiler automatically adds a forward slash.

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