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Consider

foldr (\x (a,b) -> (a || x==2, b || x==7 )) (False,False) [1..6]
--(True,False)

Ignoring the fact that this could be written easily using elem, I have the strong feeling that I could employ Arrow syntax to simplify the lambda, I just can't get it right.

Can this lambda be simplified using arrows? And do you have any general hints concerning how to "see" when arrows might work, and how to find the right expression?

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1  
Edward Kmett liberated me from my need to care about arrows three weeks ago with these comments on Brandon Simmons's blog. –  Daniel Lyons Mar 9 '12 at 19:51
1  
@DanielLyons nevertheless, the typical arrow combinators &&&, ||| and *** can be useful because of the function instance of arrow. –  Dan Burton Mar 9 '12 at 22:01
    
Agreed. I just don't think the payoff for truly, fully understanding them justifies the pain. –  Daniel Lyons Mar 9 '12 at 23:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Pull the computation out of the foldr -

ghci> :m +Control.Arrow
ghci> any (==2) &&& any (==7) $ [1..6]
(True,False)

But if you want to be sure you're only traversing the list once, try using the bifunctor package:

ghci> :m +Data.Bifunctor +Data.Bifunctor.Apply
ghci> foldr (bilift2 (||) (||) . ((==2) &&& (==7))) (False, False) [1..6]
(True,False)
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2  
Or shorter: elem 2 &&& elem 7 $ [1..6] –  Landei Mar 9 '12 at 22:58
foldr (\x -> (|| x==2) *** (|| x==7)) (False,False) [1..6]

I don't think you can abstract the x out with arrows.

Edit: well, seems like you can:

foldr (uncurry (***) . (((||) . (==2)) &&& ((||) . (==7)))) (False,False) [1..6]
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3  
Is (||) an empty expression surrounded by banana brackets? ;-) –  Andre Mar 9 '12 at 15:31
1  
If disambiguation is indeed necessary, you can always give it more whitespace: ( || ). But using 6 characters to refer to a 2-character operator is atrocious. –  Dan Burton Mar 9 '12 at 22:14
    
Even if the solution doesn't look very cute, I'll keep the uncurry (***) trick in mind. Thanks! –  Landei Mar 11 '12 at 17:12

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