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Is there a smarter way to remove all special characters rather than having a series of about 15 nested replace statements?

The following works, but only handles three characters (ampersand, blank and period).

select CustomerID, CustomerName, 
   Replace(Replace(Replace(CustomerName,'&',''),' ',''),'.','') as CustomerNameStripped
from Customer 
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4 Answers 4

up vote 12 down vote accepted

One flexible-ish way;

ALTER FUNCTION [dbo].[fnRemovePatternFromString](@BUFFER VARCHAR(MAX), @PATTERN VARCHAR(128)) RETURNS VARCHAR(MAX) AS
BEGIN
    DECLARE @POS INT = PATINDEX(@PATTERN, @BUFFER)
    WHILE @POS > 0 BEGIN
        SET @BUFFER = STUFF(@BUFFER, @POS, 1, '')
        SET @POS = PATINDEX(@PATTERN, @BUFFER)
    END
    RETURN @BUFFER
END

select dbo.fnRemovePatternFromString('cake & beer $3.99!?c', '%[$&.!?]%')

(No column name)
cake  beer 399c
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I see everyone is recommending functions. I like the idea of using a user-defined function, but then it has to go through change-control to get to the production environment. There's no way to have an in-line function in the query, is there? I'm not sure what language they are using to call the SQL query, maybe VBScript or Powershell, but now I'm thinking it's going to be a lot easier to do the stripping in that language. –  NealWalters Mar 9 '12 at 16:23
    
Like a numbers table or calendar table, or functions that split or concatenate strings, a function that can do this type of thing is a handy module to have around. Even if it doesn't get there immediately, you should consider having these things in a utility database. I don't know that performing this in the code is always the best answer either, especially if multiple different applications need to do the same thing... –  Aaron Bertrand Mar 9 '12 at 16:28
    
@Alex K., I like this solution better than my own. I never did like having to examine the string one character at a time. Do you have a way to replace extra spaces and special characters (cr/lf, tab) as well? –  datagod Mar 9 '12 at 16:58

Create a function:

CREATE FUNCTION dbo.StripNonAlphaNumerics
(
  @s VARCHAR(255)
)
RETURNS VARCHAR(255)
AS
BEGIN
  DECLARE @p INT = 1, @n VARCHAR(255) = '';
  WHILE @p <= LEN(@s)
  BEGIN
    IF SUBSTRING(@s, @p, 1) LIKE '[A-Za-z0-9]'
    BEGIN
      SET @n += SUBSTRING(@s, @p, 1);
    END 
    SET @p += 1;
  END
  RETURN(@n);
END
GO

Then:

SELECT Result = dbo.StripNonAlphaNumerics
('My Customer''s dog & #1 friend are dope, yo!');

Results:

Result
------
MyCustomersdog1friendaredopeyo

To make it more flexible, you could pass in the pattern you want to allow:

CREATE FUNCTION dbo.StripNonAlphaNumerics
(
  @s VARCHAR(255),
  @pattern VARCHAR(255)
)
RETURNS VARCHAR(255)
AS
BEGIN
  DECLARE @p INT = 1, @n VARCHAR(255) = '';
  WHILE @p <= LEN(@s)
  BEGIN
    IF SUBSTRING(@s, @p, 1) LIKE @pattern
    BEGIN
      SET @n += SUBSTRING(@s, @p, 1);
    END 
    SET @p += 1;
  END
  RETURN(@n);
END
GO

Then:

SELECT r = dbo.StripNonAlphaNumerics
('Bob''s dog & #1 friend are dope, yo!', '[A-Za-z0-9]');

Results:

r
------
Bobsdog1friendaredopeyo
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@Brian please don't edit other people's code without giving them some clue about what "didn't work" means. If you have a problem with the code, leave a comment, don't just edit it. I have no idea why your edit worked and the original "didn't work" but I would never write code like that. –  Aaron Bertrand Feb 27 '14 at 3:36
    
You're right Aaron, looking back over this, that was very rude and I would surely be very annoyed if I were you as well. I rushed big time and I apologize. So to the point I was trying to make without using my words, @c is not defined in your code, so this doesn't run at all. I think I was reaching for a char-type of structure that some other languages have... I only needed the first function but the second part is probably impacted as well. Thanks for the code, it saved me some time. :) –  Brian MacKay Feb 27 '14 at 4:02
    
I see you fixed it by eliminating @c. Thanks. –  Brian MacKay Feb 27 '14 at 16:15
    
@Brian yes, once you explained, I understood your edit. Before then I honestly didn't. Please start with comments before editing code. –  Aaron Bertrand Feb 27 '14 at 16:27
    
Understood. ;) We are all very protective of our work, although in my case anything written as far back as 2012 I wish I could erase entirely because I've learned so much since then... I imagine it will always be so. I apologize again for being indelicate. Thanks. –  Brian MacKay Feb 27 '14 at 17:18

I faced this problem several years ago, so I wrote a SQL function to do the trick. Here is the original article (was used to scrape text out of HTML). I have since updated the function, as follows:

IF (object_id('dbo.fn_CleanString') IS NOT NULL)
BEGIN
  PRINT 'Dropping: dbo.fn_CleanString'
  DROP function dbo.fn_CleanString
END
GO
PRINT 'Creating: dbo.fn_CleanString'
GO
CREATE FUNCTION dbo.fn_CleanString 
(
  @string varchar(8000)
) 
returns varchar(8000)
AS
BEGIN
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-- Title:        CleanString
-- Date Created: March 26, 2011
-- Author:       William McEvoy
--               
-- Description:  This function removes special ascii characters from a string.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


declare @char        char(1),
        @len         int,
        @count       int,
        @newstring   varchar(8000),
        @replacement char(1)

select  @count       = 1,
        @len         = 0,
        @newstring   = '',
        @replacement = ' '



---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-- M A I N   P R O C E S S I N G
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


-- Remove Backspace characters
select @string = replace(@string,char(8),@replacement)

-- Remove Tabs
select @string = replace(@string,char(9),@replacement)

-- Remove line feed
select @string = replace(@string,char(10),@replacement)

-- Remove carriage return
select @string = replace(@string,char(13),@replacement)


-- Condense multiple spaces into a single space
-- This works by changing all double spaces to be OX where O = a space, and X = a special character
-- then all occurrences of XO are changed to O,
-- then all occurrences of X  are changed to nothing, leaving just the O which is actually a single space
select @string = replace(replace(replace(ltrim(rtrim(@string)),'  ', ' ' + char(7)),char(7)+' ',''),char(7),'')


--  Parse each character, remove non alpha-numeric

select @len = len(@string)

WHILE (@count <= @len)
BEGIN

  -- Examine the character
  select @char = substring(@string,@count,1)


  IF (@char like '[a-z]') or (@char like '[A-Z]') or (@char like '[0-9]')
    select @newstring = @newstring + @char
  ELSE
    select @newstring = @newstring + @replacement

  select @count = @count + 1

END


return @newstring
END

GO
IF (object_id('dbo.fn_CleanString') IS NOT NULL)
  PRINT 'Function created.'
ELSE
  PRINT 'Function NOT created.'
GO
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I like the idea of using a user-defined function, but then it has to go through change-control to get to the production environment. –  NealWalters Mar 9 '12 at 16:22

If you can use SQL CLR you can use .NET regular expressions for this.

There is a third party (free) package that includes this and more - SQL Sharp .

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