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I have a simulated matrix of dates that I generated from a probability function. Each column represents a single iteration.

I would like to bin each run separately by decades and dump them into a new matrix where each column is the length of all decades a single run with the number dates binned by decade.

I have successfully done this for a single vector of dates, but not for a matrix:

"dates" is a vector of observed data representing when certain trees established in a population

#find min and max decade
minDecade <- min(dates) 
maxDecade <- max(dates) 

#create vector of decades 
allDecades <- seq(minDecade, 2001, by=10) 

#make empty vector of same length as decade vector
bin.vec <- rep(0,length(allDecades)) 

#populate bin.vec (empty vector) with the number of trees in each decade
for (i in 1:length(allDecades)) {                     
     bin.vec[i] <- length(which(dates==allDecades[i])) 
} 

bin.vec:

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 2 0 1 3 0 1 3 8 5 9 8 5 5 4 10 3 6 9 17 32 37 35 25 31 41 41 44 45 40 50 43 59 42 46 28 16 18 20 16 11 4 7 1

This is basically what I need to do, only for each separate column in a matrix.

My matrix looks like this (it actually has 835 rows, but I used head() to shorten it):

     1   2    3    4    5 
1  1891 1791 1771 1741 1981    
2  1881 1851 1941 1831 1841    
3  1981 1861 1761 1781 1791    
4  1911 1901 1941 1801 1801    
5  1771 1751 1841 1751 1951    
6  1821 1871 1821 1691 1851    
7  1851 1851 1931 1921 1931    
8  1921 1941 1601 1751 1861    
9  1741 1761 1931 1791 1891    
10 1751 1891 1951 1931 1901

Each column is a separate iteration of my simulation (runs <- 10) . How can I bin each column into decades separately?

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1 Answer 1

I already answered this on r-help this morning, although the data you offered looked like the transpose of the data you give here:

> dates <- scan()
1:   1891 1791 1771 1741 1981    
6:  1881 1851 1941 1831 1841    
11:  1981 1861 1761 1781 1791    
16:  1911 1901 1941 1801 1801    
21:  1771 1751 1841 1751 1951    
26:  1821 1871 1821 1691 1851    
31:  1851 1851 1931 1921 1931    
36:  1921 1941 1601 1751 1861    
41:  1741 1761 1931 1791 1891    
46:  1751 1891 1951 1931 1901
51: 
Read 50 items

 dates <- matrix(dates, ncol=5, byrow=TRUE)
 apply( dates, 2, function(colm){
                     1 + max(findInterval(colm, allDecades)) -
                             min(findInterval(colm, allDecades) )
                                } )
#-----------
#[1] 25 20 36 25 20

In my answer I did note that your problem description was ambiguous . If you want this to be a matrix whose number of rows is equal to the length of 'allDecades' then use this code:

 apply( dates, 2, function(colm) { 
                alldec0 <- rep(0, length(allDecades))
                names(alldec0) <- 1:length(alldec0)
                alldec0[ as.numeric(names(table(findInterval(colm, allDecades))))] <- 
                           table(findInterval(colm, allDecades)) 
                return(alldec0)                   } )
share|improve this answer
    
Dr. Winsemius,Thanks for responding. I am trying to bin the dates in each column into a matrix that has a length equal to the total number of decades. I need this to be a matrix whose number of rows equals the number of total possible decades represented in that matrix. "allDecades" was calculated from some collected data, so it's length is different than the simulated data. I'm sorry if I am not very clear on this. –  jtgarcia Mar 9 '12 at 18:42
    
Does that mean the second solution is what you were requesting? –  BondedDust Mar 9 '12 at 18:45
    
The overarching goal here is: for each run of my simulation, I need to know how many individuals established in each decade. my model spits out a matrix where each column is a single run. –  jtgarcia Mar 9 '12 at 18:50
    
yes, the second solution. –  jtgarcia Mar 9 '12 at 18:52

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