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Suppose I have a JTable with rows like this:

 (2, 1)
 (1, 3)
 (1, 5)
 (3, 1)
 (2, 3)
 (2, 4)

I want to sort JTable so that rows that have 1 in the first or second column are at the top, and the rest of the rows may have an arbitrary order:

 (1, 3)
 (1, 5)
 (2, 1)
 (3, 1)
 (2, 3)
 (2, 4)

Is there a way to do this in a table with TableRowSorter?

UPD: I want to sort the table programmatically, not through UI (clicking on the column headers)

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4 Answers

You can define a Comparator for the first column using setComparator method. Then, in your compare method in the Comparator, return -1 if the first argument is 1, 1 if second argument is 1 and 0 otherwise.

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I tried that -- this method would sort on the first column correctly, but if you use this same Comparator for the second column, it would produce something like: (1,3), (1,5), (2,1), (2, 3), (2, 4), (3,1) breaking up the 1's in the second column –  lynxoid Mar 9 '12 at 16:25
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  • not your are simply wrong, nor there reinvent the wheels by re_implementing one Comparator integrated in the API with another Comparator, another ways is implementing RowFilter, example for RowFilter

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from code

import java.awt.*;
import java.awt.event.*;
import javax.swing.*;
import javax.swing.table.*;

public class TableBoolean extends JFrame {

    private final static String LETTERS = "ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ";
    private static final long serialVersionUID = 1L;
    private JTable table;
    private DefaultTableModel model;

    public TableBoolean() {
        Object[][] data = {{"A", new Boolean(false), 2, 1}, {"B", new Boolean(true), 1, 3},
            {"A", new Boolean(false), 1, 5}, {"B", new Boolean(true), 3, 1},
            {"A", new Boolean(false), 2, 3}, {"B", new Boolean(true), 2, 4},
            {"A", new Boolean(false), 5, 2}, {"B", new Boolean(true), 7, 1}};
        String[] columnNames = {"String", "Boolean", "Integer", "Integer"};
        model = new DefaultTableModel(data, columnNames) {

            private static final long serialVersionUID = 1L;

            @Override
            public Class getColumnClass(int column) {
                return getValueAt(0, column).getClass();
            }

            @Override
            public boolean isCellEditable(int row, int column) {
                return true;
            }
        };
        table = new JTable(model);
        TableRowSorter<TableModel> sorter = new TableRowSorter<TableModel>(table.getModel());
        table.setRowSorter(sorter);
        table.setPreferredScrollableViewportSize(table.getPreferredSize());
        JScrollPane scrollPane = new JScrollPane(table);
        add(scrollPane);
        /*JButton button = new JButton("Add Row");
        button.addActionListener(new ActionListener() {

        @Override
        public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
        Object[] newRow = new Object[2];
        int row = table.getRowCount() + 1;
        newRow[0] = LETTERS.substring(row - 1, row);
        newRow[1] = (row % 2 == 0) ? new Boolean(true) : new Boolean(false);
        model.addRow(newRow);
        }
        });
        add(button, BorderLayout.SOUTH);*/
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        SwingUtilities.invokeLater(new Runnable() {

            @Override
            public void run() {
                TableBoolean frame = new TableBoolean();
                frame.setDefaultCloseOperation(EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
                frame.pack();
                frame.setVisible(true);
            }
        });
    }
}
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I don't want to filter out the rows - I want all rows to still be visible, but sorted in a way I described above. –  lynxoid Mar 9 '12 at 16:57
    
@lynxoid you have to write own Comparator, with not aeasy & simple logics, have you got someone ???, –  mKorbel Mar 9 '12 at 17:10
    
have look for SortKeys here or here –  mKorbel Mar 9 '12 at 17:14
    
I do not see how SortKeys solves my original problem - unless you meant to apply them some very specific way –  lynxoid Mar 9 '12 at 18:25
    
@lynxoid that reason why I answered ..., –  mKorbel Mar 9 '12 at 18:30
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up vote 1 down vote accepted

I figured a way to do it w/o using TableRowSorter: you can presort data in the TableModel, then fire an event to let the table know that the data changed. Here is the pseudocode:

Set up the table:

AbstractTableModel model = new MyModel();
JTable table = new JTable(model);

Implement MyModel:

public class MyModel implements AbstractTableModel {
  private ArrayList<Integer> data;

  ...
  // implement interface methods
  ...

  public void sortToTop(int a) {
    // float all rows w/ a in the first column to the top
    Collections.sort(data, new Comparator<Integer>() {
        public int compare(int o1, int o2) {
            if (o1 == a) return -1;
            if (o2 == a) return 1;
            return o1.compareTo(o2);
        }
    });
    // find how many rows at the top have a in the first row
    int startIndex = 0;
    boolean notFound = true;
    while (startIndex < data.size() && notFound) {
        if (data.get(startIndex) == a)
            startIndex++;
        else 
            notFound = false;
    }
    int endIndex = data.size();
            // get a sublist w/o these first rows
    List<Integer> sublist = data.subList(startIndex, endIndex);
    // sort sublist on the second column floating a to the top
    Collections.sort(sublist, new Comparator<Integer>() {
        public int compare(int o1, int o2) {
            if (o1 == a) return -1;
            if (o2 == a) return 1;
            return o1.compareTo(o2);
        }
    });
    this.fireTableDataChanged();
  }
}
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The easiest way to do this in my opinion is to first call sort on the second column, which will result in something like this:

(3, 1)
(2, 1)
(1, 3)
(2, 3)
(2, 4)
(1, 5)

but this is not yet complete. If we then call sort on the first column, then we will have:

(1, 3)
(1, 5)
(2, 1)
(2, 3)
(2, 4)
(3, 1)

This is by far the easiest way to do it.

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