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I'm learning C and now I hit a wall. Its difficult for me to understand pointers.

Imagine I have this code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <malloc.h>

#define DELTA 33

int calls, seed=356;

int sum_ds(int a){    
 int d=DELTA;          
 calls++;               
 return a+d+seed; 
}                       

int main() {
    int num;                                
    int *ptr;
    int **handle;

     num = 14;                              
     ptr = (int *)malloc(2 * sizeof(int));  
     handle = &ptr;
     *(*handle+0) = num;                    
     *(*handle+1) = num+1;  
     *ptr = num-2;      
     ptr = &num;        
     *ptr = sum_ds(num-2);
}

Lets go step by step trough my understanding.

1 - int calls creates a variable named calls and doesn't initializes it so it contains rubbish. It is stored on DATA and let's say with the memory address 0xFFAA.

2 - int seeds creates a variable named seeds initialized with the integer 356. It is stored on DATA and let's say with the memory address 0xFFAB.

3 - int num creates a variable named num and doesn't initializes it so it contains rubbish. It is stored on the STACK and let's say with the memory address 0xFFAC.

4 - int *ptr creates a pointer to int and does not assign any address to it. It is stored on the STACK and let's say with the memory address 0xFFAD.

5 - int **handle creates a pointer to a pointer of int and does not assign any address to it. It is stored on the STACK and let's say with the memory address 0xFFAE. (MANY DOUBTS HERE)

6 - num = 14 goes to the address 0xFFAC and stores the number 14 on it. It's done in the STACK.

7 - ptr = (int *)malloc(2 * sizeof(int)) On the HEAP it's assigned memory size for 2 ints and the address of the first memory byte (let's say 0xFFZZ) is stored (on STACK) on ptr so now *ptr points to that memory address.

8 - handle = &ptr handle now points to ptr. I believe it now points to whatever is on 0xFFZZ (MANY DOUBTS HERE)

9 - *(*handle+0) = num the pointer to the pointer of int now its assigned with the value of num (14) (MANY MANY MANY MANY DOUBTS HERE)

10 - *(*handle+1) = num+1 the pointer of pointer plus one of int now its assigned with the value of num + 1 (15) (MANY MANY MANY MANY DOUBTS HERE)

11 - *ptr = num-2 the value point by ptr it's assigned with the value of num - 2 (12). I believe it goes to the memory address 0xFFZZ and stores there the number 12.

12 - ptr = &num ptr now points to num, i believe it now points to 0xFFAC.

13 - *ptr = sum_ds(num-2) the value pointed by ptr is the returned value of sum_ds. I belive 0xFFAC it's assigned with 401 (12+33+356)

Is this right?

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2  
the size of int is not 1 byte ... it's 4 bytes (or 8 bytes). So in step 2, the address can't be 0xFFAB (because that's address is the second byte of the int in step 1) –  Aziz Mar 9 '12 at 16:50
    
@Aziz: An int will typically be larger than one byte, but it's not strictly required (though if it was only one byte, you'd have to have at least 16 bits in a byte). –  Jerry Coffin Mar 9 '12 at 18:21
    
+1 to counter the unjustified downvote. –  Péter Török Mar 9 '12 at 20:06
    
@PéterTörök Thanks for the up vote. Didn't understand why somebody gave me an downvote :( –  Favolas Mar 10 '12 at 18:15
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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

1 - int calls creates a variable named calls and doesn't initializes it so it contains rubbish. It is stored on DATA and let's say with the memory address 0xFFAA.

2 - int seeds creates a variable named seeds initialized with the integer 356. It is stored on DATA and let's say with the memory address 0xFFAB.

One little detail: sizeof(int) is greater than 1 (it is 4 on most mainstream platforms, so the 2nd address could not be 1 higher than the 1st. Other than that, AFAIK you are correct so far.

3 - int num creates a variable named num and doesn't initializes it so it contains rubbish. It is stored on the STACK and let's say with the memory address 0xFFAC.

4 - int *ptr creates a pointer to int and does not assign any address to it. It is stored on the STACK and let's say with the memory address 0xFFAD.

Another little detail: on most mainstream platforms, the stack grows downward, so the 4th address would be less than the 3rd. Other than that, AFAIK you are correct so far. (Moreover, addresses on the data segment, the heap and the stack would be rather different in real life.)

7 - ptr = (int *)malloc(2 * sizeof(int)) On the HEAP it's assigned memory size for 2 ints and the address of the first memory byte (let's say 0xFFZZ) is stored (on STACK) on ptr so now *ptr points to that memory address.

To be nitpicky, 'Z' is not a hexadecimal number :-) So let's say it is 0x1000 instead.

8 - handle = &ptr handle now points to ptr. I believe it now points to whatever is on 0xFFZZ (MANY DOUBTS HERE)

No, handle now contains the address of ptr, that is 0xFFAD. Indirectly though - through ptr - it indeed points to 0x1000 (was 0xFFZZ in your example).

9 - *(*handle+0) = num the pointer to the pointer of int now its assigned with the value of num (14) (MANY MANY MANY MANY DOUBTS HERE)

Basically correct. The notation you use is not the easiest to deal with, which makes it more difficult for you to follow what's going on. After step 8, *handle is equivalent to ptr. And due to pointers and arrays being interchangeable in many common situations, *(ptr+0) is equivalent to ptr[0], and also to *ptr.

10 - *(*handle+1) = num+1 the pointer of pointer plus one of int now its assigned with the value of num + 1 (15) (MANY MANY MANY MANY DOUBTS HERE)

Similar to the previous point, you are in effect assigning ptr[1] = num+1. Keep in mind though that ptr is int*, so the address difference between ptr and ptr + 1 equals to sizeof(int), which is, as mentioned above, usually 4.

11 - *ptr = num-2 the value point by ptr it's assigned with the value of num - 2 (12). I believe it goes to the memory address 0xFFZZ and stores there the number 12.

Yes, this overwrites the value set in step 9.

12 - ptr = &num ptr now points to num, i believe it now points to 0xFFAC.

Correct.

13 - *ptr = sum_ds(num-2) the value pointed by ptr is the returned value of sum_ds. I belive 0xFFAC it's assigned with 401 (12+33+356)

Correct. Since the previous step made *ptr equivalent to num, this call is also equivalent to num = sum_ds(num-2).

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Thanks for your time. My memory "notation" was for "illustration" purpose only. I know that it's not as I mention but didn't knew that the stack grows downward so thanks for pointing that out. Following your explanations now I'm stuck on point 8 because I don't know if what I've wrote on points 5 and 6 are right. Basically I don't know what handle is... –  Favolas Mar 9 '12 at 19:00
    
@Favolas, sorry, I left out points 5 & 6 because they are correct, handle is indeed a pointer to pointer to int. –  Péter Török Mar 9 '12 at 19:55
    
@Favolas, btw you can print out addresses and pointers to check their real value at any point, e.g. printf("handle is at address 0x%08X, pointing to 0x%08X, and *handle is 0x%08X .\n", &handle, handle, *handle); . –  Péter Török Mar 9 '12 at 20:01
    
Thanks for all your help. Made this code pastebin.com/DNA6h60t (sorry but don't know how to insert code on comments) to see memory address's so I can understand better. Please note that the printf that are commented give seg fault if uncommented. Basically my problem is handle. I know that it's created a pointer to a pointer of ints with int **handle but what are handle and *handle? Are they even "created"? –  Favolas Mar 10 '12 at 18:14
    
@Favolas, dereferencing an uninitalized pointer is indeed undefined behaviour, i.e. don't ever do it in production code, even for debugging purposes. So you should be able to print out &handle and handle anytime, but you must not try to print out *handle or **handle before it is properly initialized (in your case, the statement handle = &ptr does that). –  Péter Török Mar 11 '12 at 13:17
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Since calls is outside any function, it's a static variable. Static variables are initialized to 0.

Since num is a local variable (auto storage class) it is not initialized.

At your point 9, *(*handle+0) = num; is probably easiest to decipher by keeping in mind that handle = &ptr, therefore *handle = ptr, so this is basically equivalent to *(ptr+0) = num;, which is (in turn) equivalent to ptr[0] = num;.

For point 10, you get pretty much the same thing, except a +1 in both cases, so it's saying ptr[1] = num+1;.

For point 11, *ptr=num-2; overwrites what was written in point 9 -- i.e., *ptr is the same as *(ptr+0), so this is equivalent to ptr[0] = num-2;

You're correct in point 12 that ptr has been set to point at num. That means in point 13, the assignment is equivalent to num=sum_ds(num-2);

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A variable has an address and stores at that address are the value that you just put:

int a = 10;

Right?

A pointer is a kind of variable that stores the address of another variable. So...

int a = 10;
int *p = &a;

This means that "p" stores the address of "a" that has the value that you want to use.

Execute this code below and you'll understand: printf("%p %p %d %d\n", p, &a, *p, a);

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