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I'm struggling with LAPACK's dgetrf and dgetri routines. Below is a subroutine I've created (the variable fit_coeffs is defined externally and is allocatable, it's not the problem). When I run I get memory allocation errors, that appear when I assign fit_coeffs, due to the matmul(ATA,AT) line. I know this from inserting a bunch of print statements. Also, both error checking statements after calls to LAPACK subroutines are printed, suggesting an error. Does anyone understand where this comes from? I'm compiling using the command:

gfortran -Wall -cpp -std=f2003 -ffree-form -L/home/binningtont/lapack-3.4.0/ read_grib.f -llapack -lrefblas.

Thanks in advance!

subroutine polynomial_fit(x_array, y_array, D)
    integer, intent(in) :: D
    real, intent(in), dimension(:) :: x_array, y_array
    real, allocatable, dimension(:,:) :: A, AT, ATA
    real, allocatable, dimension(:) :: work
    integer, dimension(:), allocatable :: pivot
    integer :: l, m, n, lda, lwork, ok

    l = D + 1
    lda = l
    lwork = l

    allocate(fit_coeffs(l))
    allocate(pivot(l))
    allocate(work(l))
    allocate(A(size(x_array),l))
    allocate(AT(l,size(x_array)))
    allocate(ATA(l,l))

    do m = 1,size(x_array),1
      do n = 1,l,1
        A(m,n) = x_array(m)**(n-1)
      end do
    end do

    AT = transpose(A)
    ATA = matmul(AT,A)

    call dgetrf(l, l, ATA, lda, pivot, ok)
    ! ATA is now represented as PLU (permutation, lower, upper)
    if (ok /= 0) then
      write(6,*) "HERE"
    end if
    call dgetri(l, ATA, lda, pivot, work, lwork, ok)
    ! ATA now contains the inverse of the matrix ATA
    if (ok /= 0) then
      write(6,*) "HERE"
    end if

    fit_coeffs = matmul(matmul(ATA,AT),y_array)

    deallocate(pivot)
    deallocate(fit_coeffs)
    deallocate(work)
    deallocate(A)
    deallocate(AT)
    deallocate(ATA)
  end subroutine polynomial_fit
share|improve this question
2  
What is the specific error message? Are the arrays big enough? –  M. S. B. Mar 9 '12 at 17:22
    
Hi, thanks. The error is *** glibc detected *** ./a.out: malloc(): memory corruption: 0x00000000020dfbd0 ***, followed by a Backtrace and Memory map, which I don't understand really. I''ve checked that the arrays are large enough, according to what I understand from the LAPACK libraries. I'm fairly sure the problem lies in the external function calls, because of the error-checking statements that I inserted. –  Taylor Mar 9 '12 at 17:26
3  
Have you tried using the compiler switch -fcheck=all? I would also try assigning matmul(ATA,AT) to a temporary variable first and then use that variable in the second call to matmul. –  eriktous Mar 9 '12 at 17:55
2  
It may or may not help in this specific case, but -fcheck=all turns on several runtime checks. –  eriktous Mar 9 '12 at 20:34
1  
I would also try valgrind. Be sure to compile for debugging. –  Vladimir F Mar 9 '12 at 20:40

1 Answer 1

1) Where is fit_coeffs declared? I can't see how the above can even compile 1b) Implicit None is your friend!

2) You do have an interface in scope at the calling point, don't you?

3) dgertf and dgetri want "double precision" while you have single. So you need sgetrf and sgetri

"Fixing" all these and completeing the program I get

Program testit

  Implicit None

  Real, Dimension( 1:100 ) :: x, y

  Integer :: D

  Interface 
     subroutine polynomial_fit(x_array, y_array, D)
       Implicit None ! Always use this!!
       integer, intent(in) :: D
       real, intent(in), dimension(:) :: x_array, y_array
     End subroutine polynomial_fit
  End Interface

  Call Random_number( x )
  Call Random_number( y )

  D = 6

  Call polynomial_fit( x, y, D )

End Program testit

subroutine polynomial_fit(x_array, y_array, D)

  Implicit None ! Always use this!!

    integer, intent(in) :: D
    real, intent(in), dimension(:) :: x_array, y_array
    real, allocatable, dimension(:,:) :: A, AT, ATA
    real, allocatable, dimension(:) :: work, fit_coeffs
    integer, dimension(:), allocatable :: pivot
    integer :: l, m, n, lda, lwork, ok

    l = D + 1
    lda = l
    lwork = l

    allocate(fit_coeffs(l))
    allocate(pivot(l))
    allocate(work(l))
    allocate(A(size(x_array),l))
    allocate(AT(l,size(x_array)))
    allocate(ATA(l,l))

    do m = 1,size(x_array),1
      do n = 1,l,1
        A(m,n) = x_array(m)**(n-1)
      end do
    end do

    AT = transpose(A)
    ATA = matmul(AT,A)

    call sgetrf(l, l, ATA, lda, pivot, ok)
    ! ATA is now represented as PLU (permutation, lower, upper)
    if (ok /= 0) then
      write(6,*) "HERE"
    end if
    call sgetri(l, ATA, lda, pivot, work, lwork, ok)
    ! ATA now contains the inverse of the matrix ATA
    if (ok /= 0) then
      write(6,*) "HERE"
    end if

    fit_coeffs = matmul(matmul(ATA,AT),y_array)

    deallocate(pivot)
    deallocate(fit_coeffs)
    deallocate(work)
    deallocate(A)
    deallocate(AT)
    deallocate(ATA)
  end subroutine polynomial_fit

This runs to completion. If I omit the interface I get "HERE" printed twice. If I use the d versions I get seg faults.

Does this answer your question?

share|improve this answer
    
Hi, thank you for your answer. fit_coeffs is an allocatable array declared at the beginning of a module (containing public and implicit none statements), and that module is 'used' within a subroutine from which polynomial_fit is called. So an interface block interferes with the use module command. When I use dgetrf, I get a malloc(): memory corruption error, but when I use sgetrf, I simply get a segfault. –  Taylor Mar 12 '12 at 13:47
    
Do you have a short, complete program that demonstrated your problem then? –  Ian Bush Mar 12 '12 at 15:40
    
Good news, no further analysis is required. I think you were correct about the sgetrf vs. dgetrf. The segfault I encountered appears to be from something else, but now that it's fixed, sgetrf and sgetri work just fine, no memory allocation error! Thank you. –  Taylor Mar 12 '12 at 17:58
1  
@Ian: Well spotted! I think this is an excellent illustration of how (module assisted) interface checking was a great advance in fortran 90. –  eriktous Mar 13 '12 at 0:45

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