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I ran into an issue today where VB is behaving differently from C#. The issue is as follows.

Also note this is for .Net 4.0.

  • Both projects are set to build in release mode
  • Both projects are in the same solution
  • The solution is set to build in release
  • Both projects output to a Release folder in bin / obj

Everything seems to be okay except for one thing. When inspecting the files with a tool such as http://assemblyinformation.codeplex.com/ the VB projects show as Debug and the C# projects show as Release.

I tracked this down to a setting in the Advanced Compiler Options for the pdb files. If the debug info output for VB is set to anything other than none - then the project builds in debug mode (keep in mind it still outputs to the release folder). C# does not exhibit this behavior.

I did a blog post here to work around the issue - but would love to know the root cause if any one knows.

http://tsells.wordpress.com/2012/03/08/vb-projects-always-building-in-debug-mode/

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I suspect your tool is reporting incorrect information. Do note that whether or not debug info is emitted has absolutely nothing to do with whether the assembly is compiled in "Debug" or "Release" mode. –  Cody Gray Mar 9 '12 at 17:33
    
There were many discussions surrounding this in other areas. So how would you determine if it was debug or release mode just by examining the dll / executable? –  Geek Mar 9 '12 at 18:05
    
Its also worth noting that the tool shows the project as being optimized - but debug mode. –  Geek Mar 9 '12 at 18:08
    
What does that mean? Optimized but debug mode? –  Cody Gray Mar 9 '12 at 18:12
    
I did some research and this tool is using the DebuggableAttribute class and is referencing the IsJITTrackingEnabled. If it is enabled - it shows the assembly as debug mode. It is looking at the JITOptimized attribute on the debug class to tell if optimization is enabled. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… –  Geek Mar 9 '12 at 18:17
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