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In my code, I've got a class called "teacher" which has some arrays inside of it:

public class teacher
    {
        //monday
        public bool[] mon = new bool[11];

        //tuesday
        public bool[] tue = new bool[11];

        //wednesday
        public bool[] wed = new bool[11];

        //thursday
        public bool[] thu = new bool[11];

        //fri
        public bool[] fri = new bool[11];
    };

There's also a list of the teachers:

       List<teacher> teachers = new List<teacher>();

Now, once I click a button that adds a teacher, I want those arrays to fill with the values of associated checkboxes, ie.

 teachers.Add(new teacher
        {
            mon[0] = checkBox25.Checked,
            mon[1] = checkBox26.Checked,
            mon[2] = checkBox27.Checked,
        }

But it won't let me access mon[0], as it says "Invalid initializer member declarator". Any ideas on how to assign the value?

I've also changed that last bit of code into:

mon = {checkBox25.Checked, checkBox26.Checked, checkBox27.Checked, checkBox28.Checked, checkBox29.Checked, checkBox30.Checked, checkBox31.Checked, checkBox32.Checked, checkBox33.Checked, checkBox34.Checked, checkBox35.Checked},

but now it says that it cannot initialize object of type bool[] with a collection initializer.

Please, if anybody knows how to deal with that - I'd be really grateful.

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1 Answer

The reason your last two parts won't work in the initializer is that you'd need to do this instead:

teachers.Add(new teacher
    {
        mon = new[] 
            {
                checkBox25.Checked, 
                checkBox26.Checked, 
                checkBox27.Checked, 
                checkBox28.Checked, 
                checkBox29.Checked, 
                checkBox30.Checked, 
                checkBox31.Checked, 
                checkBox32.Checked, 
                checkBox33.Checked, 
                checkBox34.Checked, 
                checkBox35.Checked
            },
        // etc...
    });

You need the new[] in there to construct the new array of bool and then the initializer list dictates its contents.

That said, you'd be better off collecting your check box controls together (in an array or List<T>, etc) so that you can query them in your assignment instead, like:

teachers.Add(new teacher
    {
        mon = monCheckBoxes.Select(cb => cb.Checked).ToArray(),
        tue = // etc... 
    });
share|improve this answer
    
Obviously, your initializer answer is correct. I also have the suspicion that the op's approach is flawed. Having bool[11] for each day; I wonder if the op would prefer to encapsulate the bools into a DayMeta (or whatever name fits, DayConditionsList, DayOptionsCollection, etc). I bet each bool has a meaning, and I would represent these as boolean fields/properties. class DayMeta { bool IsAvailable ... } and then declare a DayMeta for each day in each Teacher. –  payo Mar 9 '12 at 18:04
    
Thank you guys, I find both of your answers really helpful. Yes, I'm a novice and self-learning coder, and sometimes do stupid mistakes like the one above. That said, I'm happy that there are still people like you who help the novices :) –  Scalp994 Mar 9 '12 at 18:21
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