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Is there a "goto" statement in bash ? I know It is considered bad practice, but I need specifically "goto".

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4  
No, there's not goto in bash (at least it says command not found for me). Why? Chances are there is a better way to do it. –  Niklas B. Mar 9 '12 at 18:27
4  
You never need goto, at worst you need more practice with other control flow tools. –  delnan Mar 9 '12 at 18:33
41  
He may have his reasons. I found this question because I want a goto statement to skip over a lot of code for debugging a large script without waiting an hour for various unrelated tasks to complete. I'd certainly not use a goto in the production code, but for debugging my code, it'd make my life infinitely easier, and it'd be easier to spot when it came to remove it. –  Karl Nicoll Jul 6 '12 at 10:40
7  
@delnan But having no goto can make some things more complicated. There indeed are use cases. –  glglgl May 15 '13 at 13:56
3  
I'm sick of this goto myth! There's nothing wrong with goto! Everything you write eventually becomes goto. In assembler, there is only goto. A good reason to use goto in higher programming languages is for example jumping out of nested loops in a clean and readable way. –  alex c Jul 3 at 15:07

7 Answers 7

up vote 19 down vote accepted

No, there is not; see §3.2.4 "Compound Commands" in the Bash Reference Manual for information about the control structures that do exist. In particular, note the mention of break and continue, which aren't as flexible as goto, but are more flexible in Bash than in some languages, and may help you achieve what you want. (Whatever it is that you want . . .)

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Could you expand on "more flexible in Bash than in some languages"? –  user239558 Apr 28 at 9:00
1  
@user239558: Some languages only allow you to break or continue from the innermost loop, whereas Bash lets you specify how many levels of loop to jump. (And even of languages that allow you to break or continue from arbitrary loops, most require that to be expressed statically -- e.g., break foo; will break out of the loop labeled foo -- whereas in Bash it's expressed dynamically -- e.g., break "$foo" will break out of $foo loops.) –  ruakh Apr 28 at 16:37

If you are using it to skip part of a large script for debugging (see Karl Nicoll's comment), then if false could be a good option (not sure if "false" is always available, for me it is in /bin/false):

# ... Code I want to run here ...

if false; then

# ... Code I want to skip here ...

fi

# ... I want to resume here ...

The difficulty comes in when it's time to rip out your debugging code. The "if false" construct is pretty straightforward and memorable, but how do you find the matching fi? If your editor allows you to block indent, you could indent the skipped block (then you'll want to put it back when you're done). Or a comment on the fi line, but it would have to be something you'll remember, which I suspect will be very programmer-dependent.

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Yes false is always available. But if you have a block of code you don't want to execute, just comment it out. Or delete it (and look in your source control system if you need to recover it later). –  Keith Thompson Nov 17 '13 at 15:21

You can use case in bash to simulate a goto:

#!/bin/bash

case bar in
  foo)
    echo foo
    ;&

  bar)
    echo bar
    ;&

  *)
    echo star
    ;;
esac

produces:

bar
star
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Note that this requires bash v4.0+. It is, however, not a general-purpose goto but a fall-through option for the case statement. –  mklement0 Apr 15 at 18:20

For anyone coming across this thread and reading all of the "there is no use for goto" statements. I can quickly name one extremely useful example:

Without goto 1:

int count = 1000;
char* mystring = malloc(sizeof(char)*count);
bool foundPair = false;
for(int i = 0; i < count - 1;i++)
{
    for(int j = i+1; j < count; j++)
    {
        if(*char[i] == *char[j]) foundPair = true;
            if(foundPair) break;
    }
    if(foundPair) break;
}

Without goto 2:

int count = 1000;
char* mystring = malloc(sizeof(char)*count);
bool foundPair = false;
for(int i = 0; i < count - 1 && !foundPair;i++)
{
    for(int j = i+1; j < count && !foundPair; j++)
    {
        if(*char[i] == *char[j]) foundPair = true;
    }
}
i--; j--;

WITH goto:

int count = 1000;
char* mystring = malloc(sizeof(char)*count);
for(int i = 0; i < count - 1;i++)
{
    for(int j = i+1; j < count; j++)
    {
        if(*char[i] == *char[j]) goto foundPair;
    }
}
goto nopair:
foundPair: .....

noPair: ..whatever

This removes 1) the need to create a boolean in memory, 2) an assignment statement, and 3) two comparison statements. A lot of crap just to break out of internal loops where a simple assembly level jump (i.e. goto) is much more efficient.

We all know as well that more often than not a program WILL end up with nested for loops for searches, complex operations (like the scrypt algorithm), etc. Each one of those bytes for a boolean check adds up. An extra assignment from memory to a register can interfere with the cache and pipeline like crazy and, even if it doesn't, assignment is still slow. Then, the added comparisons just add more cache and pipelining issues. Add to that the fact that many high-level languages like Java and .Net (C#, F#, etc.) are executing byte-code in an interpreted runtime environment and you have an even higher amount of overhead for each of those operations than simply at the machine level.

The only other "alternative" is to put the nested for loop in a function of its own and return a value:

bool HasPair(char* mystring, int strlen)
{
    for(int i = 0; i < count - 1;i++)
    {
        for(int j = i + 1; j < count; j++)
        {
            if(*char[i] == *char[j]) return true;
        }
    }
    return false;
}

int count = 1000;
char* mystring = malloc(sizeof(char)*count);
if(HasPair(mystring,1000))
{
    //do something
}

However, this adds the overhead of a function call: updating the stack pointer, pushing the two variables and other info onto stack, popping it all back from the stack, and finally popping the variable from the stack. Not to mention, if the return value was more complex (our example is relatively simple) the we would have to return, for example, i and j possibly if the addresses and not the values are what are important.

Since most languages don't allow returning multiple named variables (i.e. multiple variables require an array, struct, or an object of some sort) even more overhead is added by needing to create a new return type, allocate memory for that type, assign the values i and j (or whatever other values must be assigned) and then finally return the pointer/instance of the type.

Bottom line: goto's are extremely useful if you want to skip over several unnecessary operations and, in general, are the only way to effectively break out of nested for, while, and do type loops without adding undue complexity to your application.

Running simple desktop apps, who really cares nowadays right? But, if you are talking about things like core functions in the Linux, iOS, Windows, etc. kernels then speeding up these types of functions is extremely important. Or, for people programming apps for smart phones, getting every last bit of speed out of the smaller processors and stacks is important. The same goes for game programming. Most of the mathematical operations on matricies, etc. end up requiring multiple loops and we all know we want every bit of processing power to be put to good use so we can have a great life-like experience in our games.

-RJS

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2  
+1 for pointing out that purity can be less important than clarity and getting-stuff-done. –  Pat Mar 14 at 22:38
4  
Nice discussion, but unfortunately off-topic: none of this relates to the question of "is there goto in Bash?" –  Steve Bennett Apr 28 at 3:16
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I agree that this is informative, but it's off-topic and you should rather spend energy downvoting or commenting on answers that say "goto is bad". –  user239558 Apr 28 at 9:00
    
This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post. –  TarkaDaal Aug 8 at 8:08
    
Bad answer, because (1) it does not answer OP's question, (2) it airs an opinion about something that has been discussed to death already, (3) it uses performance as a non-argument (in Bash, the bottleneck is Bash itself, not the lack of goto; in C, the alleged 'function call overhead' is mitigated by optimizing compilers through inlining), (4) in the 'extremely useful example', hashing trumps a double-nested loop with goto. –  Ruud Aug 17 at 17:41

There is one more ability to achieve a desired results: command

trap

It can be used to clean-up purposes for example.

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I used recursion for a specific problem as an alternative for jump. Hope this helps. Until condition is true, it will call itself repeatedly so !Be careful here

myfunc()
{
    if [ condition ]; then     
        echo "something"          
    else        
        myfunc           
    fi        
}  
myfunc  #call to my function
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This isn't a jump; it's just a busy loop that will probably crash your stack before condition is true. –  chepner May 28 at 20:19

I come up with this goto replacement. I have small server that sometimes crashes, so I wanted something like goto to restart it endlessly.

watcher.sh

./myserver
echo restarting myserver
./watcher.sh &

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5  
Why don't you use while true; do ./myserver; echo "restarting; done instead of recursively creating a new process? –  Virgile Mar 21 '13 at 7:46
    
because bash syntax for control statements is tricky –  exebook Mar 21 '13 at 7:54
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This isn't really a goto replacement; it's just a solution to a problem where goto might also be a solution. –  chepner May 15 '13 at 13:35
3  
the issue with bash is not that is has no goto, it is that bash syntax is so unusual and difficult to remember anything. –  exebook May 15 '13 at 13:45

protected by chepner May 28 at 20:19

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