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I have an application that have ~1,000,000 strings in memory for performance reasons. My application consumes ~200 MB RAM.

I want to reduce the amount of memory consumed by the strings.

I know .NET represents strings in UTF-16 encoding (2 byte per char). Most strings in my application contain pure english chars, so storing them in UTF-8 encoding will be 2 times more efficient than UTF-16.

Is there a way to store a string in memory in UTF-8 encoding while allowing standard string functions? (My needs including mostly IndexOf with StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase).

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Do you absolutely have to load all 1,000,000 strings into memory? Can you provide more details on what exactly are you doing with all these strings in memory? –  Dean K. Mar 9 '12 at 18:58
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Why is 200MB a problem, do you have a problem with low memory conditions or out of memory conditions? –  Lasse V. Karlsen Mar 9 '12 at 19:06
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But again, is 200MB a problem? Does your users have little memory available? Note that I'm not saying 200MB is acceptable either, it depends on the application, but typically, when people "complain" about memory usage and applications, they don't consider that they have all that memory available for exactly one reason; making applications run fast! –  Lasse V. Karlsen Mar 9 '12 at 19:13
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I like to liken memory usage to garage space usage. If you have a big garage with place for about 10 cars, why are you quibbling about a square foot on a bench in the corner? –  Lasse V. Karlsen Mar 9 '12 at 19:15
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@LasseV.Karlsen - If you take care of the cents, the dollars will take care of themselves. –  daniloquio Mar 9 '12 at 19:20

5 Answers 5

Unfortunately, you can't change .Net internal representation of string. My guess is that the CLR is optimized for multibyte strings.

What you are dealing with is the famous paradigm of the Space-time tradeoff, which states that in order to gain memory you'll have to use more processor, or you can save processor by using some memory.

That said, take a look at some considerations here. If I were you, once established that the memory gain will be enough for you, do try to write your own "string" class, which uses ASCII encoding. This will probably suffice.

UPDATE:

More on the money, you should check this post, "Of memory and strings", by StackOverflow legend Jon Skeet which deals with the problem you are facing. Sorry I didn't mentioned it right away, it took me some time to find the exact post from Jon.

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Is there a way to store a string in memory in UTF-8 encoding while allowing standard string > functions? (My needs including mostly IndexOf with StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase).

You could store as a byte array, and provide your own IndexOf implementation (since converting back to string for IndexOf would likely be a huge performance hit). Use the System.Text.Encoding functions for that (best bet would be to do a build step to convert to byte, and then read the byte arrays from disk - only converting back to string for display, if needed).

You could store them in a C/C++ library, letting you use single byte strings. You probably wouldn't want to marshal them back, but you could possibly just marshal results (I assume there's some sort of searching going on here) without too much of a perf hit. C++/CLI may make this easier (by being able to write the searching code in C++/CLI, but the string "database" in C++).

Or, you could revisit your initial performance issues that needs all of the strings in memory. An embedded database, indexing, etc. may both speed things up and reduce memory usage - and be more maintainable.

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How can one implement an IgnoreCase compare of characters? Is there any UTF-8 library/representation available in C/C++? –  DxCK Mar 9 '12 at 19:48
    
@DxCK the problem you have is if you limit yourself to 8 bits, you don't support a large portion of languages used in the world, even with C++ and UTF8 –  Chris S Mar 9 '12 at 19:59
    
@Chris S How does UTF8 encoding limit the language? –  DxCK Mar 9 '12 at 20:02
    
I suggest creating a simple lookup table with the case conversion precomputed - since you will be encoding to 8 bits, you would require a 256 entry table and you could convert simply by doing a lookup (e.g byte lowChar = _lowcaseTable[upperChar];) –  user1222021 Mar 9 '12 at 20:09
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@sgorozco - I think you're confusing UTF-8 (which is Unicode) with plain ol' ASCII. UTF-8 stores the ASCII characters as single byte, but is variable-width to store the rest of Unicode. –  Mark Brackett Mar 9 '12 at 20:40

What if you store it as a bytearray? Just restore to string when you need to do some operations on it. I'd make a class for setting & getting the strings which internally stores it off as bytearrays.

to bytearray:

string s = "whatever";
byte[] b = System.Text.Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(s);

to string:

string s = System.Text.Encoding.UTF8.GetString(b);
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1  
I tried that. Converting back to String has hardly performance costs: allocating memory, converting from UTF-8 to UTF-16, then GC it. for 1,000,000 string it is very noticeable costs. –  DxCK Mar 9 '12 at 19:30
    
@DxCK "then GC it" - what do you mean by that? –  Henk Holterman Mar 9 '12 at 19:37
    
well what do you want ... performance or a smaller footprint? :) Does your app continuously need every single string? If not perhaps only store off strings that haven't been used in a while. Make a class that does some sort of internal 'memory collecting' instead of garbage collecting. –  SpoBo Mar 9 '12 at 19:45
    
I'm guessing a byte array is no good, as he needs to search the strings –  Chris S Mar 9 '12 at 19:56
    
well you could use bytes array and have good performance if your rewrite the String class but with your preferred char encoding. Yay remember data structures. –  Patrick Lorio Mar 9 '12 at 20:08

try using an in-memory-DB for as "storage" and SQL to interact with the data... For example SQLite can be deployed as part of your application (consists just of 1-2 DLLs which can be placed in the same folder as your application)...

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What if you create your own UTF-8 string class (UTF8String?) and supply an implicit cast to String? You'll be sacrificing some speed for the sake of memory, but that might be what you're looking for.

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I tried that. Converting back to String has hardly performance costs. converting from UTF-8 to UTF-16, then GC it. for 1,000,000 string it is very noticeable costs. –  DxCK Mar 9 '12 at 19:04

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