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I have the following code that does a circular shift of the bits in the array:

private static void method1(byte[] bytes) {
    byte previousByte = bytes[0];
    bytes[0] = (byte) (((bytes[0] & 0xff) >> 1) | ((bytes[bytes.length - 1] & 0xff) << 7));
    for (int i = 1; i < bytes.length; i++) {
       byte tmp = bytes[i];
       bytes[i] = (byte) (((bytes[i] & 0xff) >> 1) | ((previousByte & 0xff) << 7));
       previousByte = tmp;
    }
}

Then I thought it's easier and more readable to go backwards like this:

private static void method2(byte[] bytes) {
    byte lastByte = bytes[bytes.length-1];
    for (int i = bytes.length-1; i > 0; i--) {
       bytes[i] = (byte) (((bytes[i] & 0xff) >> 1) | ((bytes[i-1] & 0xff) << 7));
    }
    bytes[0] = (byte) (((bytes[0] & 0xff) >> 1) | ((lastByte & 0xff) << 7));
}

But I noticed that the second one (method2) is slower than the first one (method1)! I noticed the difference because I'm calling the method thousands of times. So I did a test to make sure and here is the average result from 20 tests of calling each method 3000 times (and the number of bytes is 1 million):

method1 average : 4s 572ms
method2 average : 5s 630ms

So my question is: Why is the first one faster than the second?

Here is the testing code to make sure I'm not doing something wrong with my testing:

import java.math.BigInteger;

public class BitShiftTests {

public static void main(String[] args) {

    int numOfTests = 20;
    int numberOfShifts = 3000;
    byte[] numbers = new byte[1000000];
    for (int i = 0; i < numbers.length; i++) {
        numbers[i] = (byte) (i % 255);
    }

    System.out.println("Testing method1...");
    BigInteger method1Sum = new BigInteger("00000000", 2);
    for (int i = 1; i <= numOfTests; i++) {
       long total = 0L;
       for (int j = 0; j < numberOfShifts; j++) {
          long startTime = System.nanoTime();
          method1(numbers);
          long endTime   = System.nanoTime();
          total = total + (endTime - startTime);
       }
       method1Sum = method1Sum.add(new BigInteger(Long.toString(total), 10));
       System.out.println(String.format("%-2d: %s", i, getTime(total)));
    }

    System.out.println("Testing method2...");
    BigInteger method2Sum = new BigInteger("00000000", 2);
    for (int i = 1; i <= numOfTests; i++) {
       long total = 0L;
       for (int j = 0; j < numberOfShifts; j++) {
          long startTime = System.nanoTime();
          method2(numbers);
          long endTime   = System.nanoTime();
          total = total + (endTime - startTime);
       }
       method2Sum = method2Sum.add(new BigInteger(Long.toString(total), 10));
       System.out.println(String.format("%-2d: %s", i, getTime(total)));
    }

    System.out.println("method1 average :   " + getTime(method1Sum.longValue() / numOfTests));
    System.out.println("method2 average :   " + getTime(method2Sum.longValue() / numOfTests));
}

private static void method1(byte[] bytes) {
    byte previousByte = bytes[0];
    bytes[0] = (byte) (((bytes[0] & 0xff) >> 1) | ((bytes[bytes.length - 1] & 0xff) << 7));
    for (int i = 1; i < bytes.length; i++) {
       byte tmp = bytes[i];
       bytes[i] = (byte) (((bytes[i] & 0xff) >> 1) | ((previousByte & 0xff) << 7));
       previousByte = tmp;
    }
}

private static void method2(byte[] bytes) {
    byte lastByte = bytes[bytes.length-1];
    for (int i = bytes.length-1; i > 0; i--) {
       bytes[i] = (byte) (((bytes[i] & 0xff) >> 1) | ((bytes[i-1] & 0xff) << 7));
    }
    bytes[0] = (byte) (((bytes[0] & 0xff) >> 1) | ((lastByte & 0xff) << 7));
}

private static String getTime(long nanoSecs) {

  int minutes = (int) (nanoSecs / 60000000000.0);
  int seconds = (int) (nanoSecs / 1000000000.0) - (minutes * 60);
  int millisecs = (int) (((nanoSecs / 1000000000.0) - (seconds + minutes * 60)) * 1000);
  int nanosecs = (int) nanoSecs - (millisecs * 1000000000);

  if (minutes == 0 && seconds == 0 && millisecs == 0) {
     return nanosecs + "ns";
  }

  if (minutes == 0 && seconds == 0) {
     return millisecs + "ms";
  }

  if (minutes == 0 && millisecs == 0) {
     return seconds + "s";
  }

  if (seconds == 0 && millisecs == 0) {
     return minutes + "min";
  }

  if (minutes == 0) {
     return seconds + "s " + millisecs + "ms";
  }

  if (seconds == 0) {
     return minutes + "min " + millisecs + "ms";
  }

  if (millisecs == 0) {
     return minutes + "min " + seconds + "s";
  }

  return minutes + "min " + seconds + "s " + millisecs + "ms";
}
}

Update:

Looks like the reason is I'm accessing 2 different indices in each loop in the second method, while I was accessing only 1 index in the first method. So it has nothing to do with reversing the loop.

Thanks @rm5248 and @Ben, I would choose the both of your answers if I could, but I chose the earlier one.

share|improve this question
    
@Cory I'm accessing bytes.length fewer times in the second method, and it's still slower than the first method. –  Mota Mar 9 '12 at 20:22
    
Oh, oops. I read that the second one was faster... now I'm confused. –  Cory Mar 9 '12 at 20:23
    
Perhaps you could post your test code? We're assuming your tests are clean, but we can't be certain. Also, 3000 times is not that many. What's about if you ran 1,000 tests of calling it 100,000 times? Reduce the number of bytes you're testing with if it's running too long. –  Cory Mar 9 '12 at 20:30
    
How large is the array? –  Mysticial Mar 9 '12 at 20:36
1  
Please note that when discussing performance, it's very important to say which runtime you're using (vendor and version, CPU architecture, as well as server vs desktop) –  Ben Voigt Mar 9 '12 at 21:48
show 5 more comments

2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It might be cache behavior, but the more likely explanation is what Peter said in his comments -- the JIT is better optimized for the first code.

Specifically, it's likely that the JIT recognizes that the first loop will never index beyond the bounds of the array, and thus avoids bound checking. The second loop is more complicated, and probably includes bounds checks on every access.

Besides that, your first loop only reads one value from the array, and the other from a temporary local variable which will be enregistered. The second version reads two different elements from the array.

To find out for sure, you should look at disassembly of the machine code produced by the JIT for both cases.

share|improve this answer
    
precisejava.com/javaperf/j2se/Loops.htm Has an interesting example where the second loop (actually a trivial example) runs faster on a non-JIT machine. So I agree it seems to be the JIT that optimizes the first method to make it faster. (possibly only an upper bounds check vs. both upper and lower in method 2). –  NominSim Mar 9 '12 at 21:20
    
That's the closet thing that could explain this behavior. If only I knew how to read the assembly code :) –  Mota Mar 9 '12 at 21:36
add comment

I did a quick test on this, and it seems as though the reason that the second method goes slower is because the algorithm changed a little bit. In the first, you're keeping one value in a local variable, while you're not in the second. Because of that, Java has to go to the array twice in order to get the variable out. Theoretically, this shouldn't be any different, but I think that is has to do with how arrays are implemented in Java(I suspect that if you tried it in C the times would be much closer).

For reference, here's my implementation(I think that it does the same thing, but it may not):

private static void method2(byte[] bytes) {
    byte prevByte = bytes[bytes.length-1];
    for (int i = bytes.length-1; i > 0; i--) {
        byte tmp = bytes[i];
        bytes[i] = (byte) (((bytes[i] & 0xff) >> 1) | ((prevByte & 0xff) << 7));
        prevByte = tmp;
    }
    bytes[0] = (byte) (((bytes[0] & 0xff) >> 1) | ((bytes[bytes.length-1] & 0xff) << 7));
}

Here were the average times that I got:

method1 average :   6s 555ms
method2 average :   6s 726ms
share|improve this answer
    
What do you mean by the "algorithm changed"? changed from the first method to the second? If that's what you meant then if I commented out the first method the second should go faster based on this theory? –  Mota Mar 9 '12 at 21:33
    
Aside from a code snippet that rather substantially changes the result, how's this answer different from what I said in my third paragraph? –  Ben Voigt Mar 9 '12 at 21:46
    
Yeah, that's probably a bad way of stating it. What I mean is that how you're getting the variables changed between the two methods. Again, you have a local variable in the first method that you don't have in the second. In the first method, you access the array 1,000,000 times to write and 1,000,000 times to read. In the second method, you access the array 1,000,000 to write, but 2,000,000 times to read. Keeping a local variable here helps you to cut that one million off of the reading of the array, which is where your bottleneck is occurring. (p.s. the solution I posted is wrong) –  rm5248 Mar 9 '12 at 21:53
    
Thanks for your time @rm5248, but I'm sorry I'm not convinced of your reasoning, even though you removed a "reading" from the long statement, you also added one to store it in the local variable "tmp". I guess you're getting similar results because you're now reading from only one index, whereas the original method reads from 2 indices in each loop. –  Mota Mar 9 '12 at 22:09
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