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Suppose I have this database table (some sample code below) that stores the relationship between two lists (requirements and testcases in my case) and I want to create a table with rows showing testcases and columns showing requirements with an indicator showing that a relationship exists.

A few limitations

  • I don't have the luxury of changing the db structure as this belongs to an open source test case management system (TestLink).
  • It's possible to write some code for this, but I'm hoping it can be done in MySQL.
  • Ah, and yes, it uses MySQL, so this would have to work in that environment.
  • This functionality used to exist, but has been taken out because typically, this type of work brings the db to its knees when there are tens-of-thousands of testcases and requirements.

    create table pivot ( req_id int(11), testcase_id int(11) ) ;

    /*Data for the table pivot */

    insert into pivot(req_id,testcase_id) values (1,1);

    insert into pivot(req_id,testcase_id) values (2,2);

    insert into pivot(req_id,testcase_id) values (3,3);

    insert into pivot(req_id,testcase_id) values (4,1);

    insert into pivot(req_id,testcase_id) values (5,2);

    insert into pivot(req_id,testcase_id) values (6,3);

    insert into pivot(req_id,testcase_id) values (2,1);

    insert into pivot(req_id,testcase_id) values (3,2);

What I want to get out of the query is a table that looks somethign like this:

   1    2    3    4    5    6
1  x    x         x
2       x    x         x
3            x              x

Note:the row are the testcase_ids and the columns are the 'req_ids'

Anyone have a tip on how to get this with just SQL?

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1  
You're trying to generate a report of a relational model, this isn't something you should be doing in SQL. SQL is an engine for reliably storing and returning structured data, not for formatting data. A reporting tool or even a spreadsheet will easily be able to pivot this data for you. –  MyItchyChin Mar 9 '12 at 21:09
    
If you have a known set of testcase_ids then you can write a tedious series of left joins to get the result. If you don't know, then you could generate the series of left joins as a dynamic query, then put that together into the afore mentioned tedious query. It's tedious and unpleasant either way. –  Griffin Mar 9 '12 at 21:21
    
The testcases would grow over time (as would the list of requirements) so a generalized way to accomplish this would be the preferred way. –  not-bob Mar 9 '12 at 21:41
    
Thanks to everyone for chipping in :) –  not-bob Mar 9 '12 at 21:41

3 Answers 3

below is a lot more efficient:

create one table for test_cases, like

create table testCases(
id int(11) auto_increment,
testcase varchar(200),
primary key(id))

one table for requirements

requirements(
id int(11) auto_increment,
requirements varchar(200),
primary key(id))

then in a third table map the relationship

 create table matchRequirementsToTests(
 requirements varchar(200),
 testcase varchar(200),
primary key(requirements, testcase),
foreign key (requirements) references Requirements(id),
foreign key(test case) references Test_cases(id))
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Sorry, this db is not mine to change, but to query. –  not-bob Mar 9 '12 at 21:23
    
I see. Unfortunately what you are trying to do is not really suitable for mysql. You should do it at the control layer -- php, java, etc. after getting the result set from mysql –  kasavbere Mar 10 '12 at 0:16
    
Hello. This is the way you create the three tables (as a many to many relation), but how do you use them to perform queries (and let SQL follow the relations)? Thanks –  skan Sep 8 '13 at 22:35
select testcase_id, 
  if(sum(req_id = 1), 'X', '') as '1', 
  if(sum(req_id = 2), 'X', '') as '2', 
  if(sum(req_id = 3), 'X', '') as '3', 
  if(sum(req_id = 4), 'X', '') as '4', 
  if(sum(req_id = 5), 'X', '') as '5', 
  if(sum(req_id = 6), 'X', '') as '6'
from pivot
group by testcase_id;

It's ugly, but it works:

+-------------+---+---+---+---+---+---+
| testcase_id | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 |
+-------------+---+---+---+---+---+---+
|           1 | X | X |   | X |   |   | 
|           2 |   | X | X |   | X |   | 
|           3 |   |   | X |   |   | X | 
+-------------+---+---+---+---+---+---+
3 rows in set (0.00 sec)
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so each time I add a requirement, I need to modify the script? is there a way to generalize this? –  not-bob Mar 9 '12 at 21:34
    
I don't know of any way to dynamically generate columns in a result set. If it were my application, I would write a program to generate the sql, then run the sql on the database; not try to get the sql to do the dynamic part. You have more tools to write efficient sql in other procedural languages - you can analyze the schema automatically, decide on what columns you need, generate the specific sql, run it, and get the output you need. –  D Mac Mar 10 '12 at 13:53
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I now have a name for what I'm trying to accomplish. It's a 'dynamic crosstab'. Here is how I got to the solution. Thanks to http://rpbouman.blogspot.com/2005/10/creating-crosstabs-in-mysql.html for the clear instructions for getting here.

Lines 1-20 - Set up a table to use for testing.

Lines 22-29 - a 'static' crosstab query, assuming I know how many requirements I've got. Thanks D Mac for the solution you gave :)

Lines 30-44 - A query that dynamically generates the static query above.

Lines 45-72 - This is where I’m having the problem. The intent is to create a stored procedure that returns the result of the dynamic query. MySQL is saying there is a syntax issue, but I don't see how to fix it. Any thoughts?

drop table if exists pivot;

create table `pivot` ( 
`req_id` int(11), 
`testcase_id` int(11) 
); 

/*Data for the table `pivot` */ 

insert into `pivot`(`req_id`,`testcase_id`) values (1,4); 
insert into `pivot`(`req_id`,`testcase_id`) values (2,4); 
insert into `pivot`(`req_id`,`testcase_id`) values (3,4); 
insert into `pivot`(`req_id`,`testcase_id`) values (4,7); 
insert into `pivot`(`req_id`,`testcase_id`) values (1,7); 
insert into `pivot`(`req_id`,`testcase_id`) values (2,12); 
insert into `pivot`(`req_id`,`testcase_id`) values (3,12); 
insert into `pivot`(`req_id`,`testcase_id`) values (4,4); 

select * from pivot;

select testcase_id
,        if(sum(req_id = 1), 1, 0)
,        if(sum(req_id = 2), 1, 0)
,        if(sum(req_id = 3), 1, 0)
,        if(sum(req_id = 4), 1, 0)
from pivot
group by testcase_id;

select concat(
      'select testcase_id','\n'
      , group_concat(
         concat(
                ',        if(sum(req_id = ',p2.req_id,'), 1, 0)','\n'
          )
          order by p2.req_id
          separator ''
        )
      , 'from pivot','\n'
      , 'group by testcase_id;','\n'
      ) statement
from pivot p2
order by p2.req_id;

CREATE PROCEDURE p_coverage()
LANGUAGE SQL
NOT DETERMINISTIC
CONTAINS SQL
SQL SECURITY DEFINER
begin
    select concat(
                  'select testcase_id','\n'
                  , group_concat(
                     concat(
                            ',        if(sum(req_id = ',p2.req_id,'), 1, 0)','\n'
                      )
                      order by p2.req_id
                      separator ''
                    )
                  , 'from pivot','\n'
                  , 'group by testcase_id;','\n'
                  ) statement
    into @coverage_query
    from pivot p2
    order by p2.req_id;

    prepare coverage from @coverage_query;

    execute coverage;

    deallocate prepare coverage;
end;

select * from pivot;
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