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Using scala how can I create a new map from two maps that contain a map where the resulting map only includes matches where keys are the same and combines the internal maps.

Iterable[Map[String, Map[String,Float]]

Example:

val map1 = Iterable(Map(
        1 -> Map(key1 -> val1), 
        2 -> Map(key2 -> val2), 
        3 -> Map(key3 -> val3))) 
val map2 = Iterable(Map(
        1 -> Map(key11 -> val11), 
        3 -> Map(key33 -> val33), 
        4 -> Map(key44 -> val44), 
        5 -> Map(key55 -> val55)))

I want a resulting map that would be

val map3 - Map(
        1 -> Map(key1 -> val1, key11 -> val11), 
        3 -> Map(key3 -> val3, key33 -> val33))

thanks

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Update: I don't really understand what your edit about Iterables means, or the error in your comment, but here's a complete working example with Strings and Floats:

val map1: Map[Int, Map[String, Float]] = Map(
  1 -> Map("key1" -> 1.0F),
  2 -> Map("key2" -> 2.0F),
  3 -> Map("key3" -> 3.0F))

val map2: Map[Int, Map[String, Float]] = Map(
  1 -> Map("key11" -> 11.0F),
  3 -> Map("key33" -> 33.0F), 
  4 -> Map("key44" -> 44.0F),      
  5 -> Map("key55" -> 55.0F))

val map3: Map[Int, Map[String, Float]] = for {
  (k, v1) <- map1
  v2 <- map2.get(k)
} yield (k, v1 ++ v2)

Update in response to your question below: it doesn't make a lot of sense to have a list of maps, each containing a single mapping. You can very easily combine them into a single map using reduceLeft:

val maps = List(
  Map(1216 -> Map("key1" -> 144.0F)),
  Map(1254 -> Map("key2" -> 144.0F)),
  Map(1359 -> Map("key3" -> 144.0F))
)

val bigMap = maps.reduceLeft(_ ++ _)

Now you have one big map of integers to maps of strings to floats, which you can plug into my answer above.

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i got the following error when trying to use this constructor cannot be instantiated to expected type; found : (T1, T2) required: scala.collection.immutable.Map[String,scala.collection.immutable.Map[java.lang.S‌​tring,java.lang.Float]] –  chiappone Mar 9 '12 at 21:46
    
The issue is may map1 and map2 are returned to me like this: val Iterable[Map[Int, Map[String, Float]]] –  chiappone Mar 9 '12 at 21:57
    
Are you sure there's always (and only) one map in the Iterable? Then just take the head. –  Travis Brown Mar 9 '12 at 21:58
    
No the data looks like this: List(Map(1216 -> Map(key -> 144.0)), Map(1254 -> Map(key -> 144.0)), Map(1359 -> Map(key -> 144.0)) –  chiappone Mar 9 '12 at 22:10
    
I gave this to you because on my original question you were right. I will create a new question based on what I really am looking for. –  chiappone Mar 9 '12 at 22:25
val keys = map1.keySet & map2.keySet
val map3 = keys.map(k => k -> (map1(k) ++ map2(k)))
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Sorry, I realized that my returning maps are of type iterable. –  chiappone Mar 9 '12 at 21:32

I have been playing with something similar to convert a Seq(Map("one" -> 1), Map("two" -> 2)) to Map("one" -> 1, "two" -> 2).

I have been looking at previous answers and thought it was too difficult. After playing a bit I found that this solution works and it easy:

val seqOfMaps = Seq(Map("one" -> 1), Map("two" -> 2))
seqOfMaps: Seq[scala.collection.immutable.Map[String,Int]] = List(Map(one -> 1), Map(two -> 2))

val allInOneMap = seqOfMaps.flatten.toMap
allInOneMap: scala.collection.immutable.Map[String,Int] = Map(one -> 1, two -> 2)

The advantage of this approach is that possible empty maps automatically get filtered out.

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