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For example when you introduce an static class in your source code, csc compiler turns it into a sealed abstract class (Correct me if I am wrong, please).

But how about Interface; Does the CLR knows what an interface is? Or compiler converts it to to some kind of type declaration?

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4  
If the compiler turned an abstract class into a sealed one, how could any class possibly derive from it to implement the abstract methods? –  hvd Mar 9 '12 at 21:49
2  
An abstract class is very different from a static sealed class. What made you think the compiler turned one into another? And yes, the compiler does make an interface type. –  Kendall Frey Mar 9 '12 at 21:49
    
Have you tried to compile an assembly and then look with ildasm? –  Davin Tryon Mar 9 '12 at 21:49
    
Sorry guys, my bad typing; edited the question –  pencilCake Mar 9 '12 at 21:52
    
For a full description on how Types are defined in the CLI you can look at section §10 in Partition II in the CLI standard ECMA-335 –  Conrad Frix Mar 9 '12 at 22:09

4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

For example when you introduce an abstract class in your source code, csc compiler turns it into a sealed static class (Correct me if I am wrong, please).

I am correcting you.

An abstract class such as:

public abstract class Foo
{

}

looks like this in IL:

.class public abstract auto ansi beforefieldinit Foo
    extends [mscorlib]System.Object
{
    .method family hidebysig specialname rtspecialname instance void .ctor() cil managed
    {
    }
}

But how about Interface; Does the CLR knows what an interface is?

Yes, it knows. For example:

public interface IFoo
{

}

translates into:

.class public interface abstract auto ansi IFoo
{
}
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I have corrected the question; I have noticed it after the post; sorry. –  pencilCake Mar 9 '12 at 21:54
    
@pencilCake, answer updated. –  Darin Dimitrov Mar 9 '12 at 21:55

You are wrong, it's the static class that is converted to an equivalent sealed abstract class.

And interfaces are full members of .NET, with distinct metadata and behavior (e.g. multiple inheritance) different from any other kind of type.

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Totally right; I have fixed the question; my bad (static class --> sealed abstract in IL) –  pencilCake Mar 9 '12 at 21:53

Here's what ILSpy shows for the following code.

C#:

interface A
{
    void M();
}

IL:

.class interface nested private auto ansi abstract A
{
    // Methods
    .method public hidebysig newslot abstract virtual 
        instance void M () cil managed 
    {
    } // end of method A::M

} // end of class A

So, yes, it does know.

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This is what an interface looks like to the CLR:

.class public interface abstract auto ansi IDisposable
{
    .custom instance void System.Runtime.InteropServices.ComVisibleAttribute::.ctor(bool) = { bool(true) }
    .method public hidebysig newslot abstract virtual instance void Dispose() cil managed
    {
    }
}

IDisposable taken as an example.

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