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I've a simple MySQL table named 'test' with two columns:

  1. Auto incrementing int column called 'id'
  2. Varchar(3000) column called 'textcol'

I create an index in the table based on the 'textcol' column. However, the ORDER BY query doesn't seem to be using the index i.e. the EXPLAIN statement on a simple query with ORDER BY on textcol shows NULL in the Key column in its output and also uses filesort.

Any pointers to make changes to help use the index for the ORDER by query will be useful to me.

MySQL version as given by "mysql --version' command:

mysql Ver 14.14 Distrib 5.1.58, for debian-linux-gnu (x86_64) using readline 6.2

mysql> CREATE TABLE test (id INTEGER NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT, PRIMARY KEY(id), textcol VARCHAR(3000));
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.05 sec)

mysql> DESCRIBE test;
+---------+---------------+------+-----+---------+----------------+
| Field   | Type          | Null | Key | Default | Extra          |
+---------+---------------+------+-----+---------+----------------+
| id      | int(11)       | NO   | PRI | NULL    | auto_increment |
| textcol | varchar(3000) | YES  |     | NULL    |                |
+---------+---------------+------+-----+---------+----------------+
2 rows in set (0.00 sec)

mysql> CREATE INDEX textcolindex ON test (textcol);
Query OK, 0 rows affected, 2 warnings (0.06 sec)
Records: 0  Duplicates: 0  Warnings: 0

mysql> SHOW INDEX FROM test;
+-------+------------+--------------+--------------+-------------+-----------+-------------+----------+--------+------+------------+---------+
| Table | Non_unique | Key_name     | Seq_in_index | Column_name | Collation | Cardinality | Sub_part | Packed | Null | Index_type | Comment |
+-------+------------+--------------+--------------+-------------+-----------+-------------+----------+--------+------+------------+---------+
| test  |          0 | PRIMARY      |            1 | id          | A         |           0 |     NULL | NULL   |      | BTREE      |         |
| test  |          1 | textcolindex |            1 | textcol     | A         |        NULL |     1000 | NULL   | YES  | BTREE      |         |
+-------+------------+--------------+--------------+-------------+-----------+-------------+----------+--------+------+------------+---------+
2 rows in set (0.00 sec)

mysql> INSERT INTO test (textcol) VALUES ('test1');
Query OK, 1 row affected (0.00 sec)

mysql> INSERT INTO test (textcol) VALUES ('test2');
Query OK, 1 row affected (0.00 sec)

mysql> INSERT INTO test (textcol) VALUES ('test3');
Query OK, 1 row affected (0.00 sec)

mysql> INSERT INTO test (textcol) VALUES ('test4');
Query OK, 1 row affected (0.00 sec)


mysql> EXPLAIN SELECT * FROM test ORDER BY textcol;
+----+-------------+-------+------+---------------+------+---------+------+------+----------------+
| id | select_type | table | type | possible_keys | key  | key_len | ref  | rows | Extra          |
+----+-------------+-------+------+---------------+------+---------+------+------+----------------+
|  1 | SIMPLE      | test  | ALL  | NULL          | NULL | NULL    | NULL |    4 | Using filesort |
+----+-------------+-------+------+---------------+------+---------+------+------+----------------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)

mysql> EXPLAIN SELECT * FROM test ORDER BY id;
+----+-------------+-------+------+---------------+------+---------+------+------+----------------+
| id | select_type | table | type | possible_keys | key  | key_len | ref  | rows | Extra          |
+----+-------------+-------+------+---------------+------+---------+------+------+----------------+
|  1 | SIMPLE      | test  | ALL  | NULL          | NULL | NULL    | NULL |    4 | Using filesort |
+----+-------------+-------+------+---------------+------+---------+------+------+----------------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)
share|improve this question
    
Are you continuing to see this with lots of data in the table? Explain doesn't tell you what it will always do with this query, only what it would do with this query at this moment. –  Thomas Andrews Mar 9 '12 at 21:54
    
I changed the size of the textcol column to 10 bytes and inserted 30000 new rows. The ORDER BY in SELECT * still doesn't use the index. However, I just noticed that a SELECT COUNT(*) statement uses the index. Any idea why this is happening? –  Kowshik Mar 9 '12 at 22:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Since it has to load the entire table to answer the query and sorting 4 elements is cheap, the query optimizer might just be avoiding touching the index. Does it still happen with larger tables?

Note that a varchar(3000) column can't be a covering index because MySQL won't include more than the first 768 or so bytes of a varchar in an index.

If you want the query to only read the index, the index must have every column you're SELECTing for in it. On innodb, that should start working for your two-column table once you make textcol small enough; on MyISAM you'll need to include the primary key column yourself, like CREATE INDEX textcolindex ON test (textcol,id);

share|improve this answer
    
I changed the size of the textcol column to 10 bytes and inserted 30000 new rows. The ORDER BY in SELECT * still doesn't use the index. However, I just noticed that a SELECT COUNT(*) statement uses the index. Any idea why this is happening? –  Kowshik Mar 9 '12 at 22:14
    
To clarify, indexes are 1000 byte limit for MyISAM and 767 for InnoDB, far shy of 3000 varchar field. In effect, MySQL will use an index prefix, which can be used to aid seeking (eg. WHERE clauses), but it cannot be used for sorting, since it is incomplete: dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/order-by-optimization.html –  Marcus Adams Mar 9 '12 at 22:22
1  
@Kowshik, without a "covering" index, MySQL would have to do 30,000 seeks to utilize the index. A filesort is still easier than 30,000 seeks. Try SELECT textcol ORDER BY textcol instead. –  Marcus Adams Mar 9 '12 at 22:29
    
@MarcusAdams: I see. Thanks for the info. Is there any way at all by which I could speed up a : "SELECT * FROM TABLE ORDER BY X" query? –  Kowshik Mar 9 '12 at 22:30
    
@MarcusAdams: Yes, SELECT textcol ORDER BY textcol uses the index! Also if I create a different index that comprises of all the columns, then the SELECT * statement uses the index. :) –  Kowshik Mar 9 '12 at 22:33

Some useful articles on ORDER BY optimisation:

http://www.mysqlperformanceblog.com/2006/09/01/order-by-limit-performance-optimization/

http://opsmonkey.blogspot.co.uk/2009/03/mysql-query-optimization-for-order-by.html

As largely discussed, keep the varchar down to 767 and add a key for the order by:

CREATE TABLE test (
id INTEGER NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
textcol VARCHAR(767),
PRIMARY KEY(id),
KEY orderby (`textcol`)
);

To avoid filesorts if adding extra 'WHERE' parameters, extend the 'orderby' index key using a multiple column index:

CREATE TABLE test (
id INTEGER NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT, 
tom INT(11) NOT NULL DEFAULT 0,
gerry INT(11) NOT NULL DEFAULT 0,
textcol VARCHAR(767),
PRIMARY KEY(id), 
KEY orderby (`tom`,`gerry`, `textcol`)
);

Also:

INSERT INTO test (tom, gerry, textcol) VALUES (1,2,'test4');
INSERT INTO test (tom, gerry, textcol) VALUES (1,2,'test2');
EXPLAIN SELECT id, textcol FROM test WHERE tom = 1 AND gerry =2 ORDER BY textcol;

Extra: 'Using where; Using Index'

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