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I have a little script that gives me the difference in seconds between two dates in javascript (the dates are imported from php).

It works fine to check the dates on pageload.

<script>
 // convert php dates into javascript
 var t = "<? echo $rs6[logout_timer] ?>".split(/[- :]/);
 var t2 = "<? echo $now ?>".split(/[- :]/);
 var d = new Date(t[0], t[1]-1, t[2], t[3], t[4], t[5]);
 var d2 = new Date(t2[0], t2[1]-1, t2[2], t2[3], t2[4], t2[5]);

 // get the difference in seconds
 var dif = d.getTime() - d2.getTime();
 var secs = dif / 1000;

 if (secs < -60) { 
    document.getElementById("logout").innerHTML = "more than 60 secs have passed";
    } else {
    document.getElementById("logout").innerHTML = "under 60 seconds";
    } 
</script>

What I need though, is for this to run and check every second, not just on pageload. How can I adjust my script to do this?

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How come you are using the current time from the server? –  Juan Mendes Mar 9 '12 at 21:54

4 Answers 4

Place your check within a javascript timer.

See here for reference: http://www.w3schools.com/js/js_timing.asp

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Just you can use strtotime for this

$ts1 = strtotime($rs6[logout_timer]);
$ts2 = strtotime($now);

$seconds_diff = $ts1 - $ts2;
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Use a timeout, I've shown it with a setTimeout, but you can use setInterval also

var t = "<? echo $rs6[logout_timer] ?>".split(/[- :]/);
var d = new Date(t[0], t[1]-1, t[2], t[3], t[4], t[5]);

function checkElapsedTime() {
    var now  = new Date();
    var secs = (now.getTime() - d.getTime() ) /1000;
    if (secs > 60) { 
        document.getElementById("logout").innerHTML = "more than 60 secs have passed";
    } else {
        document.getElementById("logout").innerHTML = "under 60 seconds";
    }     
    setTimeout(checkElapsedTime, 1000);
}
checkElapsedTime();
share|improve this answer
    
I dunno why, but its showing the secs as 28884.00 and huge numbers, when the date difference is really only say a second apart. –  user1022585 Mar 9 '12 at 22:28
    
ok i figured out why. Because one is taking the date from the server and the other date is from javascript (local) –  user1022585 Mar 9 '12 at 22:42
    
@user1022585 Yes, Did you notice that I commented on the question (Why are you using current time from the server?) I can't go into details without knowing how you're using it. Ideally you don't mix server and client times, that can be a gigantic mess. But in some cases, you have to. When that happens, make sure you are working with timestamps, which are timezone independent. –  Juan Mendes Mar 9 '12 at 23:31

Wrap your code inside a function, then call it from time to time with setInterval. Example below considers the function will be named countdown:

setInterval(countdown, 1000); // run every 1000ms

Note: you don't need to use PHP to get d2. Just use new Date() to get the current date in javascript.

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