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I recently came across some code that looks something like this:

<head>
   <?php /* The following scripts are required */ ?>
   <script type="text/javascript" src="script.js"></script>
</head>

where the PHP consists only of a comment within an HTML document.

I imagine this was done to prevent the comment being visible in the source code of the page, and to make the resultant HTML page lighter. Clever.

However, I wonder what the performance impact, or any other notable caveat, of invoking the PHP engine for nothing is.

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2  
Benchmark it. There will be an impact, although very tiny. If the page is cached afterwards using the proper headers, then it's probably insanely small. –  netcoder Mar 9 '12 at 22:19

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The performance impact is so incredibly tiny you don't need to worry about it. Any impact would be offset by the bandwidth you save by not sending HTML comments to your user. On a very busy website, that would be a saving worth having.

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Good question!

A set up a test case to work out what the hit would be. The test scripts is:

<head>
   <!-- The following scripts are required -->
   <script type="text/javascript" src="script.js"></script>
   <!-- The following scripts are required -->
   <script type="text/javascript" src="script.js"></script>
   <!-- The following scripts are required -->
   <script type="text/javascript" src="script.js"></script>
   <!-- The following scripts are required -->
   <script type="text/javascript" src="script.js"></script>
   <!-- The following scripts are required -->
   <script type="text/javascript" src="script.js"></script>
   <!-- The following scripts are required -->
   <script type="text/javascript" src="script.js"></script>
   <!-- The following scripts are required -->
   <script type="text/javascript" src="script.js"></script>
   <!-- The following scripts are required -->
   <script type="text/javascript" src="script.js"></script>
   <!-- The following scripts are required -->
   <script type="text/javascript" src="script.js"></script>
</head>

And then the same but replacing HTML with PHP comments. I used 10 comments to make the maths easier - and it's probably in the right ball-park.

10000 requests took 9.117546 seconds using HTML comments, and 10.92784 seconds using PHP comments. The difference being 1.81029 seconds, making it 0.000181029 seconds per page load quicker for HTML meaning that the average page load was 1/10000th of a second slower using PHP to hide the comments.

The data transfered was 5.55MB for the PHP comments and 11.4MB for HTML - thought it must be noted here that the difference artificially high because there's no HTML content.

You can see the full results of the tests here: http://slightlymore.co.uk/html_comments.txt and http://slightlymore.co.uk/php_comments.txt

In short, the hit on performance in PHP is negligible, but saved bandwidth will pay off much more.

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+1 Thanks for the benchmarking! –  msanford Mar 10 '12 at 5:12

Everyone else essentially says "it makes very little difference". This is a correct observation for a couple of infrastructure templates: where PHP is delivered through mod_php5 or one of the true FastCGI implementations. However this is certainly not the case on a shared hosting account where account separation is enforced by UID and PHP is delivered by a php-cgi activation per request. This is approx 100mSec CPU over head per request whereas Apache serving an HTML page is a few mSec.

A factor of 30x or so in CPU load on such requests is not "it makes very little difference".

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True, but one has to assume that a page with PHP comments has some actual PHP logic in it. In that case the extra server load created by a comment is still negligible, because the time delay is caused by PHP instantiating itself for each page load, not the code itself. If someone is using PHP as a 'comment engine' only in 100% static HTML pages, then the user might be advised to think about what they're doing. On a busy page the server-load vs bandwidth cost arguably would still favour the PHP comments. Bandwidth is expensive, RAM is cheap. –  fred2 Mar 10 '12 at 18:00
    
@fred2, look at the OP: "PHP consists only of a comment within an HTML document." so your "one has to assume" assertion is incorrect in this case. I agree about bandwidth, but the % extra for compressed HTML comments is in noise. –  TerryE Mar 10 '12 at 18:15
    
Yeah, I read that as 'the PHP between the <? ?> tags', but you are right. If one had a really busy page/shared php-cgi server, and no PHP logic whatsoever, you'd probably argue for skipping comments entirely in any form. What comment could really be necessary? –  fred2 Mar 10 '12 at 18:28

The performance hit would not be seen by clients, nor really on the server. I can't imagine that the performance difference would be measurable.

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Comments encapsulated within <!-- --> will be sent to the client, the ones in <?php ?> will not.

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1  
Sorry, jumped over the part where you did already mention this.. –  Niklas R Mar 9 '12 at 22:21

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