Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

All the standard implementations I have tried allow values to be assigned to the std::ostream_iterator's without having them dereferenced before the assignment. Although the standard algorithms dereference the iterators before the assignment, I would like to know why there are implementations that don't just forbid the assignment statically (with the help of a proxy class) so that the compilation would just fail, so that the user knows something wrong might happen if such assignment is ported to another implementation not allowing the assignment for some reasons. In general, when implementing a standard functionality, is it a good practice to limit the implementation to only allow what is explicitly mentioned by the standard?

#include <iterator>
#include <string>
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

int main() {
    ostream_iterator<string> o(cout);
    o = "Hello World\n"; // o is not dereferenced! It compiles with my GCC environment
    o++; // to make sure the implementation writes to cout
}
share|improve this question
    
In general, when implementing a standard functionality, is it a good practice to limit the implementation to only allow what is explicitly mentioned by the standard? Yes, of course. – Jesse Good Mar 9 '12 at 23:43
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The operator overload that allows this assignment is specified by the C++ language standard. Thus, a C++ Standard Library implementation must provide it.

The overload is specified as follows (from C++11 §24.6.2.2/1):

ostream_iterator& operator=(const T& value);

Effects:

*out_stream << value;
if(delim != 0)
    *out_stream << delim;

return (*this);

(T is the T with which the ostream_iterator was instantiated. In your example, it is string.)

share|improve this answer

Stream iterators are really just fake iterators. The insertion happens when assigning for ostream_iterator and the extraction happens when dereferencing for istream_iterator. The operator*() for ostream_iterator is actually specified as a no-op to just return *this.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.