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Hi I'm trying to write a program that can compare two files line by line, word by word, or character by character in C. It has to be able to read in command line options "-l -w -i or --"... if the option is -l it compares the files line by line. if the option is -w it compares the files word by word. if the options is -- it automatically assumes that the next arg is the first filename. and if the option is -i it compares them in a case insensitive manner. Otherwise it defaults to comparing the files character by character

It's not supposed to matter how many time the options are input as long as -w and -l aren't inputted at the same time and there are no more or less than 2 files.

I don't even know where to begin with parsing the command line arguments. PLEASE HELP :(

So this is the code that I came up with for everything. I haven't error checked it quite yet, but I was wondering if I'm writing things in an overcomplicated manner?

/*
 * Functions to compare files.
 */
int compare_line();
int compare_word();
int compare_char();
int case_insens();

/*
 * Program to compare the information in two files and print message saying 
 * whether or not this was successful.
 */
int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
/*Loop counter*/
  size_t i = 0;

  /*Variables for functions*/
  int caseIns = 0;
  int line = 0;
  int word = 0;

  /*File pointers*/
  FILE *fp1, *fp2;

  /*
   * Read through command-line arguments for options.
   */
  for (i = 1; i < argc; i++) {
    printf("argv[%u] = %s\n", i, argv[i]);
    if (argv[i][0] == '-') {
       if (argv[i][1] == 'i') 
       {
           caseIns = 1;
       }
       if (argv[i][1] == 'l')
       {
           line = 1;
       }
       if (argv[i][1] == 'w')
       {
           word = 1;
       }
       if (argv[i][1] == '-')
       {
           fp1 = argv[i][2];
           fp2 = argv[i][3];
       }
       else 
       {
           printf("Invalid option.");
           return 2;
       }
    } else {
       fp1(argv[i]);
       fp2(argv[i][1]);
    }
  }

  /*
   * Check that files can be opened.
   */
  if(((fp1 = fopen(fp1, "rb")) ==  NULL) || ((fp2 = fopen(fp2, "rb")) == NULL))
  {
      perror("fopen()");
      return 3;
  }
  else{
        if (caseIns == 1)
        {
            if(line == 1 && word == 1)
            {
                printf("That is invalid.");
                return 2;
            }
            if(line == 1 && word == 0)
            {
                if(compare_line(case_insens(fp1, fp2)) == 0)
                        return 0;
            }
            if(line == 0 && word == 1)
            {
                if(compare_word(case_insens(fp1, fp2)) == 0)
                    return 0;
            }
            else
            {
                if(compare_char(case_insens(fp1,fp2)) == 0)
                    return 0;
            }
        }
        else
        {
            if(line == 1 && word == 1)
            {
                printf("That is invalid.");
                return 2;
            }
            if(line == 1 && word == 0)
            {
                if(compare_line(fp1, fp2) == 0)
                    return 0;
            }
            if(line == 0 && word == 1)
            {
                if(compare_word(fp1, fp2) == 0)
                    return 0;
            }
            else
            {
                if(compare_char(fp1, fp2) == 0)
                    return 0;
            }
        }

  }
    return 1;
    if(((fp1 = fclose(fp1)) == NULL) || (((fp2 = fclose(fp2)) == NULL)))
        {
            perror("fclose()");
            return 3;
        }
        else
        {
            fp1 = fclose(fp1);
            fp2 = fclose(fp2);
        }
}

/*
 * Function to compare two files line-by-line.
 */
int compare_line(FILE *fp1, FILE *fp2)
{
    /*Buffer variables to store the lines in the file*/
    char buff1 [LINESIZE];
    char buff2 [LINESIZE];

    /*Check that neither is the end of file*/
    while((!feof(fp1)) && (!feof(fp2)))
    {
        /*Go through files line by line*/
        fgets(buff1, LINESIZE, fp1);
        fgets(buff2, LINESIZE, fp2);
    }
    /*Compare files line by line*/
    if(strcmp(buff1, buff2) == 0)
    {
        printf("Files are equal.\n");
        return 0;
    }
    printf("Files are not equal.\n");
    return 1;
}   

/*
 * Function to compare two files word-by-word.
 */
int compare_word(FILE *fp1, FILE *fp2)
{
    /*File pointers*/
    FILE *fp1, *fp2;

    /*Arrays to store words*/
    char fp1words[LINESIZE];
    char fp2words[LINESIZE];

    if(strtok(fp1, " ") == NULL || strtok(fp2, " ") == NULL)
    {
        printf("File is empty. Cannot compare.\n");
        return 0;
    }
    else
    {
        fp1words = strtok(fp1, " ");
        fp2words = strtok(fp2, " ");

        if(fp1words == fp2words)
        {
            fputs(fp1words);
            fputs(fp2words);
            printf("Files are equal.\n");
            return 0;
        }
    }
    return 1;
}

/*
 * Function to compare two files character by character.
 */
int compare_char(FILE *fp1,FILE *fp2)
{
    /*Variables to store the characters from both files*/
    int c;
    int d;

    /*Buffer variables to store chars*/
    char buff1 [LINESIZE];
    char buff2 [LINESIZE];

    while(((c = fgetc(fp1))!= EOF) && (((d = fgetc(fp2))!=EOF)))
    {
        if(c == d)
        {
            if((fscanf(fp1, "%c", buff1)) == (fscanf(fp2, "%c", buff2)))
            {
                printf("Files have equivalent characters.\n");
                return 1;
                break;
            }
        }

    }
        return 0;
}

/*
 * Function to compare two files in a case-insensitive manner.
 */
int case_insens(FILE *fp1, FILE *fp2, size_t n)
{
    /*Pointers for files.*/
    FILE *fp1, *fp2;

    /*Variable to go through files.*/
    size_t i = 0;

    /*Arrays to store file information.*/
    char fp1store[LINESIZE];
    char fp2store[LINESIZE];

    while(!feof(fp1) && !feof(fp2))
    {
         for(i = 0; i < n; i++)
         {
                fscanf(fp1, "%s", fp1store);
                fscanf(fp2, "%s", fp2store);

                fp1store = tolower(fp1store);
                fp2store = tolower(fp2store);

                return 1;
         }
    }
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
4  
How about getopt(3) ? –  cnicutar Mar 10 '12 at 0:23
    
I'm not quite sure how to use getopt()... I haven't learned about it yet in my class. –  user1251020 Mar 10 '12 at 0:31
2  
So, go and read the manual page for it; it is not very complex, and the manual page probably includes an example for you to experiment with (and if your local man page doesn't, you can certainly find examples on the web). –  Jonathan Leffler Mar 10 '12 at 0:54
    
This is a high level library: argparse in c, very easy to use. –  Cofyc Jan 15 at 2:49

6 Answers 6

To my knowledge, the three most popular ways how to parse command line arguments in C are:

  • Getopt (#include <unistd.h> from the POSIX C Library), which can solve simple argument parsing tasks. If you're a bit familiar with bash, the getopt built-in of bash is based on Getopt from the GNU libc.
  • Argp (#include <argp.h> from the GNU C Library), which can solve more complex tasks and takes care of stuff like, for example:
    • -?, --help for help message, including email address
    • -V, --version for version information
    • --usage for usage message
  • Doing it yourself, which I don't recommend for programs that would be given to somebody else, as there is too much that could go wrong or lower quality. The popular mistake of forgetting about '--' to stop option parsing is just one example.

The GNU C Library documentation has some nice examples for Getopt and Argp.

Example for using Getopt

#include <stdbool.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <unistd.h>

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    bool isCaseInsensitive = false;
    int opt;
    enum { CHARACTER_MODE, WORD_MODE, LINE_MODE } mode = CHARACTER_MODE;

    while ((opt = getopt(argc, argv, "ilw")) != -1) {
        switch (opt) {
        case 'i': isCaseInsensitive = true; break;
        case 'l': mode = LINE_MODE; break;
        case 'w': mode = WORD_MODE; break;
        default:
            fprintf(stderr, "Usage: %s [-ilw] [file...]\n", argv[0]);
            exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
        }
    }

    // Now optind (declared extern int by <unistd.h>) is the index of the first non-option argument.
    // If it is >= argc, there were no non-option arguments.

    // ...
}

Example for using Argp

#include <argp.h>
#include <stdbool.h>

const char *argp_program_version = "programname programversion";
const char *argp_program_bug_address = "<your@email.address>";
static char doc[] = "Your program description.";
static char args_doc[] = "[FILENAME]...";
static struct argp_option options[] = { 
    { "line", 'l', 0, 0, "Compare lines instead of characters."},
    { "word", 'w', 0, 0, "Compare words instead of characters."},
    { "nocase", 'i', 0, 0, "Compare case insensitive instead of case sensitive."},
    { 0 } 
};

struct arguments {
    enum { CHARACTER_MODE, WORD_MODE, LINE_MODE } mode;
    bool isCaseInsensitive;
};

static error_t parse_opt(int key, char *arg, struct argp_state *state) {
    struct arguments *arguments = state->input;
    switch (key) {
    case 'l': arguments->mode = LINE_MODE; break;
    case 'w': arguments->mode = WORD_MODE; break;
    case 'i': arguments->isCaseInsensitive = true; break;
    case ARGP_KEY_ARG: return 0;
    default: return ARGP_ERR_UNKNOWN;
    }   
    return 0;
}

static struct argp argp = { options, parse_opt, args_doc, doc, 0, 0, 0 };

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    struct arguments arguments;

    arguments.mode = CHARACTER_MODE;
    arguments.isCaseInsensitive = false;

    argp_parse(&argp, argc, argv, 0, 0, &arguments);

    // ...
}

Example for Doing it Yourself

#include <stdbool.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{   
    bool isCaseInsensitive = false;
    enum { CHARACTER_MODE, WORD_MODE, LINE_MODE } mode = CHARACTER_MODE;
    size_t optind;
    for (optind = 1; optind < argc && argv[optind][0] == '-'; optind++) {
        switch (argv[optind][1]) {
        case 'i': isCaseInsensitive = true; break;
        case 'l': mode = LINE_MODE; break;
        case 'w': mode = WORD_MODE; break;
        default:
            fprintf(stderr, "Usage: %s [-ilw] [file...]\n", argv[0]);
            exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
        }   
    }   

    // *argv points to the remaining non-option arguments.
    // If *argv is NULL, there were no non-option arguments.

    // ...
}   

Disclaimer: I am new to Argp, the example might contain errors.

share|improve this answer

Use getopt(), or perhaps getopt_long().

int iflag = 0;
enum { WORD_MODE, LINE_MODE } op_mode = WORD_MODE;  // Default set
int opt;

while ((opt = getopt(argc, argv, "ilw") != -1)
{
    switch (opt)
    {
    case 'i':
        iflag = 1;
        break;
    case 'l':
        op_mode = LINE_MODE;
        break;
    case 'w':
        op_mode = WORD_MODE;
        break;
    default:
        fprintf(stderr, "Usage: %s [-ilw] [file ...]\n", argv[0]);
        exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
    }
}

/* Process file names or stdin */
if (optind >= argc)
    process(stdin, "(standard input)", op_mode);
else
{
    int i;
    for (i = optind; i < argc; i++)
    {
        FILE *fp = fopen(argv[i], "r");
        if (fp == 0)
            fprintf(stderr, "%s: failed to open %s (%d %s)\n",
                    argv[0], argv[i], errno, strerror(errno));
        else
        {
            process(fp, argv[i], op_mode);
            fclose(fp);
        }
    }
 }

Note that you need to determine which headers to include (I make it 4 that are required), and the way I wrote the op_mode type means you have a problem in the function process() - you can't access the enumeration down there. It's best to move the enumeration outside the function; you might even make op_mode a file-scope variable without external linkage (a fancy way of saying static) to avoid passing it to the function. This code does not handle - as a synonym for standard input, another exercise for the reader. Note that getopt() automatically takes care of -- to mark the end of options for you.

I've not run any version of the typing above past a compiler; there could be mistakes in it.


For extra credit, write a (library) function:

int filter(int argc, char **argv, int idx, int (*function)(FILE *fp, const char *fn));

which encapsulates the logic for processing file name options after the getopt() loop. It should handle - as standard input. Note that using this would indicate that op_mode should be a static file scope variable. The filter() function takes argc, argv, optind and a pointer to the processing function. It should return 0 (EXIT_SUCCESS) if it was able to open all the files and all invocations of the function reported 0, otherwise 1 (or EXIT_FAILURE). Having such a function simplifies writing Unix-style 'filter' programs that read files specified on the command line or standard input.

share|improve this answer
#include <stdio.h>

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    size_t i;
    size_t filename_i = -1;

    for (i = 0; i < argc; i++)
    {
        char const *option =  argv[i];
        if (option[0] == '-')
        {
            printf("I am a flagged option");
            switch (option[1])
            {
                case 'a':
                    /*someting*/
                    break;
                case 'b':
                    break;
                case '-':
                    /* "--" -- the next argument will be a file.*/
                    filename_i = i;
                    i = i + 1;
                    break;
                default:
                    printf("flag not recognised %s", option);
                    break;
            }
        }
        else
        {   
            printf("I am a positional argument");
        }

        /* At this point, if -- was specified, then filename_i contains the index
         into argv that contains the filename. If -- was not specified, then filename_i will be -1*/
     }
  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
No; absolutely not a good way of doing it...Use one of the argument parsing functions - getopt() or getopt_long(). –  Jonathan Leffler Mar 10 '12 at 0:55
4  
Sounds like a cheat, given that this is blatently a homework question. Additionally, the OP is having a hard time understanding the concept of what a string is and how to read parts of it. Foisting getopts on him is a mistake. –  Pod Mar 10 '12 at 1:01
    
It is a homework question. I know what a string is. I just don't understand how to break down the command line arguments because it seems confusing to me when you can input the options any number of times, so you can't really figure out where the filenames are. Maybe I'm overthinking it? –  user1251020 Mar 10 '12 at 1:26

Instructional template for parsing command line arguments in C.

C:>programName -w -- fileOne.txt fileTwo.txt

BOOL argLine = FALSE;
BOOL argWord = FALSE;
BOOL argChar = FALSE;
char * fileName1 = NULL;
char * fileName2 = NULL;

int main(int argc, char * argv[]) {
    int i;
    printf("Argument count=%d\n",argc);
    for (i = 0; i < argc; i++) {
        printf("Argument %s\n",argv[i]);
        if (strcmp(argv[i],"-l")==0) {
            argLine = TRUE;
            printf("    argLine=TRUE\n");
        }
        else if (strcmp(argv[i],"-w")==0) {
            argWord = TRUE;
            printf("    argWord=TRUE\n");
        }
        else if (strcmp(argv[i],"-c")==0) {
            argChar = TRUE;
            printf("    argChar=TRUE\n");
        }
        else if (strcmp(argv[i],"--")==0) {
            if (i+1 <= argc) {
                fileName1 = argv[++i];
                printf("    fileName1=%s\n",fileName1);
            }
            if (i+1 <= argc) {
                fileName2 = argv[++i];
                printf("    fileName2=%s\n",fileName2);
            }
        }
    }
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
... I don't think there is a boolean variable in C...? –  user1251020 Mar 10 '12 at 1:18
    
My eclipse/windows environment has type BOOL. Simply change it to type int or char and adjust code accordingly. –  Java42 Mar 10 '12 at 1:25
1  
C99 has a type _Bool at all times, and a header <stdbool.h> which defines bool as _Bool and true and false and __bool_true_false_are_defined, all macros (which, exceptionally, can be undefined and redefined without invoking undefined behaviour; that licence is, however, tagged 'obsolescent'). So, if you have a C99 compiler, you can use <stdbool.h> and bool. If not, you either write one for yourself (it isn't hard) or you use a native equivalent. –  Jonathan Leffler Mar 10 '12 at 18:51
    
This code does not handle option grouping, so -wi would not be recognized. –  Jonathan Leffler Mar 10 '12 at 19:06
1  
@Wolfer My C environment has type BOOL (as typedef int BOOL) and type boolean (as typedef unsigned char boolean) and no definition for type bool. In the example, simply change to type int or char and adjust code accordingly. –  Java42 Oct 14 '13 at 17:44
    /*
      Here's a rough one not relying on any libraries.
      Example:
      -wi | -iw //word case insensitive
      -li | -il //line case insensitive
      -- file  //specify the first filename (you could just get the files
      as positional arguments in the else statement instead)
      PS: don't mind the #define's, they're just pasting code :D
    */
    #ifndef OPT_H
    #define OPT_H

    //specify option requires argument
    #define require \
      optarg = opt_pointer + 1; \
      if (*optarg == '\0') \
      { \
        if (++optind == argc) \
          goto opt_err_arg; \
        else \
          optarg = argv[optind]; \
      } \
      opt_pointer = opt_null_terminator;

    //start processing argv
    #define opt \
    int   optind                 = 1; \
    char *opt_pointer            = argv[1]; \
    char *optarg                 = NULL; \
    char  opt_null_terminator[2] = {'\0','\0'}; \
    if (0) \
    { \
      opt_err_arg: \
        fprintf(stderr,"option %c requires argument.\n",*opt_pointer); \
        return 1; \
      opt_err_opt: \
        fprintf(stderr,"option %c is invalid.\n",*opt_pointer); \
        return 1; \
    } \
    for (; optind < argc; opt_pointer = argv[++optind]) \
      if (*opt_pointer++ == '-') \
      { \
        for (;;++opt_pointer) \
          switch (*opt_pointer) \
          {

    //stop processing argv
    #define done \
          default: \
            if (*opt_pointer != '\0') \
              goto opt_err_opt; \
            else \
              goto opt_next; \
            break; \
          } \
        opt_next:; \
      }
    #endif //opt.h

    #include <stdio.h>
    #include "opt.h"
    int
    main (int argc, char **argv)
    {
      #define by_character 0
      #define by_word      1
      #define by_line      2
      int cmp = by_character;
      int case_insensitive = 0;
      opt
      case 'h':
        puts ("HELP!");
        break;
      case 'v':
        puts ("fileCMP Version 1.0");
        break;
      case 'i':
        case_insensitive = 1;
        break;
      case 'w':
        cmp = by_word;
        break;
      case 'l':
        cmp = by_line;
        break;
      case '-':required
        printf("first filename: %s\n", optarg);
        break;
      done
      else printf ("Positional Argument %s\n", argv[optind]);
      return 0;
    }
share|improve this answer

I've found Gengetopt to be quite useful - you specify the options you want with a simple configuration file, and it generates a .c/.h pair that you simply include and link with your application. The generated code makes use of getopt_long, appears to handle most common sorts of command line parameters, and it can save a lot of time.

A gengetopt input file might look something like this:

version "0.1"
package "myApp"
purpose "Does something useful."

# Options
option "filename" f "Input filename" string required
option "verbose" v "Increase program verbosity" flag off
option "id" i "Data ID" int required
option "value" r "Data value" multiple(1-) int optional 

Generating the code is easy and spits out cmdline.h and cmdline.c:

$ gengetopt --input=myApp.cmdline --include-getopt

The generated code is easily integrated:

#include <stdio.h>
#include "cmdline.h"

int main(int argc, char ** argv) {
  struct gengetopt_args_info ai;
  if (cmdline_parser(argc, argv, &ai) != 0) {
    exit(1);
  }
  printf("ai.filename_arg: %s\n", ai.filename_arg);
  printf("ai.verbose_flag: %d\n", ai.verbose_flag);
  printf("ai.id_arg: %d\n", ai.id_arg);
  int i;
  for (i = 0; i < ai.value_given; ++i) {
    printf("ai.value_arg[%d]: %d\n", i, ai.value_arg[i]);
  }
}

If you need to do any extra checking (such as ensuring flags are mutually exclusive), you can do this fairly easily with the data stored in the gengetopt_args_info struct.

share|improve this answer

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