Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a question concerning how the "this" pointer is treated in a nested function scenario.

Say I insert this following sample code into a web page. I get an error when I call the nested function "doSomeEffects()". I checked in Firebug and it indicates that when I am in that nested function, the "this" pointer is actually pointing to the global "window" object - which I did not expect. I must not be understanding something correctly because I thought since I declared the nested function within a function of the object, it should have "local" scope in relation to the function (i.e. the "this" pointer would be referring to the object itself like how it is in my first "if" statement).

Any pointers (no pun intended) would be appreciated. Thank you kindly in advance.

var std_obj = {
  options : { rows: 0, cols: 0 },
  activeEffect : "none",
  displayMe : function() {

    // the 'this' pointer is referring to the std_obj
    if (this.activeEffect=="fade") { }

    var doSomeEffects = function() {

      // the 'this' pointer is referring to the window obj, why?
      if (this.activeEffect=="fade") { }

    }

    doSomeEffects();   
  }
};

std_obj.displayMe();
share|improve this question
    
What exactly is your question ? –  Sarfraz Mar 10 '12 at 5:03
    
When used inside a function, this refers to the object on which the function is invoked. –  user880772 Mar 10 '12 at 5:04
2  
What you could do in the outer scope is something like var self = this; and then refer to self in the inner function via closure. –  Kai Mar 10 '12 at 5:05
1  
doSomeEffects is not associated with any obj in particular, so this is assumed to be the window, the mother of all elements. –  user880772 Mar 10 '12 at 5:05
    
Thanks everyone for your answers below. They are all awesome and well explained. I understand now. Thanks again! –  JoJoeDad Mar 10 '12 at 5:25

4 Answers 4

up vote 29 down vote accepted

In JavaScript the this object is really based on how you make your function calls.

In general there are three ways to setup the this object:

  1. someThing.someFunction(arg1, arg2, argN)
  2. someFunction.call(someThing, arg1, arg2, argN)
  3. someFunction.apply(someThing, [arg1, arg2, argN])

In all of the above examples the this object will be someThing. Calling a function without a leading parent object will generally get you the global object which in most browsers means the window object.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 Elegantly explained. –  jfriend00 Mar 10 '12 at 5:12

this is not part of the closure scope, it can be thought of as an additional parameter to the function that is bound at the call site. If the method is not called as a method then the global object is passed as this. In the browser, the global object is identical to window. For example, consider the following funciton,

function someFunction() {
}

and the following object,

var obj = { someFunction: someFunction };

If you call the function using method syntax such as,

obj.someFunciton();

then this is bound to obj.

If you call someFunction() directly, such as,

someFunction();

then this is bound to the global object, that is window.

The most common work around is to capture this into the closure such as,

displayMe : function() {      

    // the 'this' pointer is referring to the std_obj      
    if (this.activeEffect=="fade") { }      
    var that = this;  
    var doSomeEffects = function() {      

      // the 'this' pointer is referring to global
      // that, however, refers to the outscope this
      if (that.activeEffect=="fade") { }      
    }      

    doSomeEffects();         
 }      
share|improve this answer

There's a difference between enclosure variables and "this". "this" is actually defined by the invoker of the function, while explicit variables remain intact inside the function declaration block known as the enclosure. See the example below:

function myFirstObject(){
    var _this = this;
    this.name = "myFirstObject";
    this.getName = function(){
       console.log("_this.name = " + _this.name + " this.name = " + this.name);  
    }
}

function mySecondObject(){
    var _this = this;
    this.name = "mySecondObject";
    var firstObject = new myFirstObject();
    this.getName = firstObject.getName
}

var secondObject = new mySecondObject();
secondObject.getName();

you can try it out here: http://jsfiddle.net/kSTBy/

What's happening in your function is "doSomeEffects()", is being called explicitly, this means context or the "this" of the function is the window. if "doSomeEffects" was a prototype method e.g. this.doSomeEffects on say "myObject", then myObject.doSomeEffects() would cause "this" to be "myObject".

share|improve this answer

As explained by Kyle, you could use call or apply to specify this within the function:

Here is that concept applied to your code:

var std_obj = {
    options: {
        rows: 0,
        cols: 0
    },
    activeEffect: "none",
    displayMe: function() {

        // the 'this' pointer is referring to the std_obj
        if (this.activeEffect == "fade") {}

        var doSomeEffects = function() {
            // the 'this' pointer is referring to the window obj, why?
            if (this.activeEffect == "fade") {}
        }

        doSomeEffects.apply(this,[]);
    }
};

std_obj.displayMe();

JsFiddle

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.