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So I made a very simple program that counts down from 99 (sings 99 bottles of beer) but I keep getting 1 of 2 errors

#!/usr/bin/env python
print("This program sings the song 99 bottles of beer on the wall")
lim = input("What number do you want it to count down from?")
def sing():
    global lim
    while int(lim) >= 0:
        if int(lim) != 1 or int(lim) != 0:
            print(lim, "bottles of beer on the wall", lim, "bottles of beer")
            print("Take one down pass it around...")
            print(lim, "bottles of beer on the wall")
            input("\nPRESS ENTER\n")
            lim -= 1
sing()
TypeError: unsupported operand type(s) for -=: 'str' and 'int'

Then, when I change lim -= 1 to int(lim) -= 1, it says SyntaxError: illegal expression for augmented assignment

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Consider: for bottles in range(lim, 0, -1): .... –  torrential coding Mar 10 '12 at 5:24
    
Are you on Python 2 or 3? Because input() and the print() function are used in Python 3, but your first script line reads: #!/usr/bin/env python instead of #!/usr/bin/env python3. Could you specify which one are you trying to run? –  Rik Poggi Mar 10 '12 at 5:50

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You need to covert lim from a string to an integer. Try this:

lim = int(input("What number do you want it to count down from?"))
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6  
If you do this, you can also remove all of the other conversions peppered throughout sing(). –  Johnsyweb Mar 10 '12 at 5:24

If you're using Python 2.x (you don't specify), use raw_input instead.

lim = int(raw_input("What number do you want it to count down from?"))

From there, you can remove all the checks to int(lim), as lim is already an integer.

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The first line of the OP code reads: #!/usr/bin/env python, but after print is used like a function (who knows, maybe it's from the __future__). –  Rik Poggi Mar 10 '12 at 5:48

You get that TypeError because lim is a string. And strings do not support a -= operator:

>>> s = '10'
>>> s -= 1
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError: unsupported operand type(s) for -=: 'str' and 'int'

What you need to do is to convert lim to integer, something like this:

lim = input('Insert number: ')
lim = int(lim)

Don't worry about print after, it can print integers too, not just strings :)


I'd also say that there's a main problem with your first line. Judging from your code, this:

#!/usr/bin/env python

should be

#!/usr/bin/env python3

since you're writing code with Python 3 syntax/fashion.

You could also get rid of the global statement:

#!/usr/bin/env python3
def sing():
    print("This program sings the song 99 bottles of beer on the wall")
    lim = input("What number do you want it to count down from?")
    lim = int(lim)
    while lim > 1:
        print(lim, "bottles of beer on the wall", lim, "bottles of beer")
        print("Take one down pass it around...")
        print(lim, "bottles of beer on the wall")
        input("\nPRESS ENTER\n")
        lim -= 1
sing()
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input() is perfectly valid syntax in Python 2.x, it just doesn't do what raw_input does. input() evaluates the code in 2.x; in 3.x it merely reads it in. –  Makoto Mar 10 '12 at 5:58
    
@Makoto: Yes, but not in the way the OP use it. There would be no need for converting to integer after. –  Rik Poggi Mar 10 '12 at 6:04

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