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When I want to create a gradient background in css3 I have to do this:

background-color: #3584ba;
background-image: -webkit-gradient(linear, left top, left bottom, from(#54a0ce), to(#3584ba)); /* Safari 4+, Chrome */
background-image: -webkit-linear-gradient(top, #54a0ce, #3584ba); /* Safari 5.1+, Chrome 10+ */
background-image:    -moz-linear-gradient(top, #54a0ce, #3584ba);  /* FF3.6 */
background-image:      -o-linear-gradient(top, #54a0ce, #3584ba); /* Opera 11.10+ */
filter: progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.gradient(startColorstr='#54a0ce', endColorstr='#3584ba'); /* IE */

and this is really annoying. Is there a better solution, for example a jquery plugin, that will make my code cross browser compatible, if I just use:

background-image: -webkit-linear-gradient(top, #54a0ce, #3584ba); /* Safari 5.1+, Chrome 10+ */

for example? Is there a tool to help me write css3 code more easy?

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2  
write your own if it's that annoying... prefixr.com –  webarto Mar 10 '12 at 11:36
    
+1 for putting up your highly thought problem –  abhijit Mar 10 '12 at 11:49
3  
@webarto - why to reinvent the wheel? :) –  Tamás Pap Mar 10 '12 at 12:03
6  
because only then you will truly know how wheel works –  webarto Mar 10 '12 at 15:44
    
@webarto yeah, sometimes this is the way to go :) –  Tamás Pap Mar 10 '12 at 15:58

4 Answers 4

up vote 18 down vote accepted

There are many tools for this:

These are generally referred to as CSS Preprocessors.

You would end up writing something like this once, like a function definition (usually called a "mixin"):

.linear-gradient(@start, @end) {
    background-color: @end;
    background-image: -webkit-gradient(linear, left top, left bottom, from(@start), to(@end)); /* Safari 4+, Chrome */
    background-image: -webkit-linear-gradient(top, @start, @end); /* Safari 5.1+, Chrome 10+ */
    background-image:    -moz-linear-gradient(top, @start, @end);  /* FF3.6 */
    background-image:      -o-linear-gradient(top, @start, @end); /* Opera 11.10+ */
    filter: progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.gradient(startColorstr='@start', endColorstr='@end'); /* IE */
}

Then to apply:

.my-class {
    .linear-gradient(#54a0ce, #3584ba);
}
.my-other-class {
    .linear-gradient(#ccc, #aaa);
}

Highly recommend.

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1  
I personally highly recommend LESS and LESSPHP. +1 for a good range of solutions. –  Bojangles Mar 10 '12 at 11:51
    
There's also cssmin for PHP which is a bit more "traditional" in the sense that it just adds the browser specific properties for you, but it's nowhere near as useful as mixins and nested styles (although your code "degrades" back to standard CSS better). –  Wesley Murch Mar 10 '12 at 11:55
    
Bourbon mixin collection for Sass has a lot of CSS3 mixins that handle all the browser compatibility issues. –  Tomas Mar 10 '12 at 14:51

You could always use an online tool to generate them for you:

http://www.colorzilla.com/gradient-editor/

http://www.css3maker.com/css-gradient.html

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Is there a better solution, for example a jquery plugin, that will make my code cross browser compatible

For a client-side solution, you could use http://lea.verou.me/prefixfree/

A script that lets you use only unprefixed CSS properties everywhere. It works behind the scenes, adding the current browser’s prefix to any CSS code, only when it’s needed.

You would then only need to use the unprefixed function, which is mysteriously missing from your CSS:

background-image: linear-gradient(top, #54a0ce, #3584ba);
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2  
those plugins are slow with limited function. Either go with SASS/LESS or don't use any. –  vincicat Mar 10 '12 at 13:38
    
Yes, a server-side preprocessor is usually the superior choice. However, it was worth mentioning a client-side option. –  thirtydot Mar 12 '12 at 3:04

I found the answer to the question. It is a program called "autoprefixer", it's free, and it uses Grunt (as well as a couple other things). You give it the file or directory with unedited css, and automatically adds the prefixes based on the specific browsers you want to target, and outputs them in a new file. Here's an article about how to use it.

Post about Autoprefixer by the author: http://css-tricks.com/autoprefixer/ How to use Grunt for the absolute beginner: http://24ways.org/2013/grunt-is-not-weird-and-hard/ Then you can look it up on Github to find the readme.

I was looking for the exact same thing, and this was the best solution I found that just processes regular CSS. I hope that helps.

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