Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Upon building an MVC framework in PHP I ran into a problem which could be solved easily using Java style generics. An abstract Controller class might look something like this:

abstract class Controller {

abstract public function addModel(Model $model);

There may be a case where a subclass of class Controller should only accept a subclass of Model. For example ExtendedController should only accept ReOrderableModel into the addModel method because it provides a reOrder() method that ExtendedController needs to have access to:

class ExtendedController extends Controller {

public function addModel(ReOrderableModel $model) {

In PHP the inherited method signature has to be exactly the same so the type hint cannot be changed to a different class, even if the class inherits the class type hinted in the superclass. In java I would simply do this:

abstract class Controller<T> {

abstract public addModel(T model);


class ExtendedController extends Controller<ReOrderableModel> {

public addModel(ReOrderableModel model) {

But there is no generics support in PHP. Is there any solution which would still adhere to OOP principles?

Edit I am aware that PHP does not require type hinting at all but it is perhaps bad OOP. Firstly it is not obvious from the interface (the method signature) what kind of objects should be accepted. So if another developer wanted to use the method it should be obvious that objects of type X are required without them having to look through the implementation (method body) which is bad encapsulation and breaks the information hiding principle. Secondly because there's no type safety the method can accept any invalid variable which means manual type checking and exception throwing is needed all over the place!

share|improve this question
    
in php you can pass any type object you want without having to worry –  dynamic Mar 10 '12 at 12:41
5  
I am aware of this already but it is perhaps bad OOP. Firstly it is not obvious from the interface (the method signature) what kind of objects should be accepted. So if another developer wanted to use the method it should be obvious that only objects of type X should be used without them having to look through the implementation (method body) which is bad encapsulation and breaks the information hiding principle. Secondly because there's no type safety the method can accept any invalid variable which means manual type checking and exception throwing is needed all over the place. –  Jonathan Mar 10 '12 at 13:17

8 Answers 8

up vote 5 down vote accepted

It appears to work for me (though it does throw a Strict warning) with the following test case:

class PassMeIn
{

}

class PassMeInSubClass extends PassMeIn
{

}

class ClassProcessor
{
    public function processClass (PassMeIn $class)
    {
        var_dump (get_class ($class));
    }
}

class ClassProcessorSubClass extends ClassProcessor 
{
    public function processClass (PassMeInSubClass $class)
    {
        parent::processClass ($class);
    }
}

$a  = new PassMeIn;
$b  = new PassMeInSubClass;
$c  = new ClassProcessor;
$d  = new ClassProcessorSubClass;

$c -> processClass ($a);
$c -> processClass ($b);
$d -> processClass ($b);

If the strict warning is something you really don't want, you can work around it like this.

class ClassProcessor
{
    public function processClass (PassMeIn $class)
    {
        var_dump (get_class ($class));
    }
}

class ClassProcessorSubClass extends ClassProcessor 
{
    public function processClass (PassMeIn $class)
    {
        if ($class instanceof PassMeInSubClass)
        {
            parent::processClass ($class);
        }
        else
        {
            throw new InvalidArgumentException;
        }
    }
}

$a  = new PassMeIn;
$b  = new PassMeInSubClass;
$c  = new ClassProcessor;
$d  = new ClassProcessorSubClass;

$c -> processClass ($a);
$c -> processClass ($b);
$d -> processClass ($b);
$d -> processClass ($a);

One thing you should bear in mind though, this is strictly not best practice in OOP terms. If a superclass can accept objects of a particular class as a method argument then all its subclasses should also be able of accepting objects of that class as well. Preventing subclasses from processing classes that the superclass can accept means you can't use the subclass in place of the superclass and be 100% confident that it will work in all cases. The relevant practice is known as the Liskov Substitution Principle and it states that, amongst other things, the type of method arguments can only get weaker in subclasses and the type of return values can only get stronger (input can only get more general, output can only get more specific).

It's a very frustrating issue, and I've brushed up against it plenty of times myself, so if ignoring it in a particular case is the best thing to do then I'd suggest that you ignore it. But don't make a habit of it or your code will start to develop all kinds of subtle interdependencies that will be a nightmare to debug (unit testing won't catch them because the individual units will behave as expected, it's the interaction between them where the issue lies). If you do ignore it, then comment the code to let others know about it and that it's a deliberate design choice.

share|improve this answer
    
You know what? I didn't even try it to see if it actually just worked haha. I simply read that it doesn't work and believed it. I guess I can use the @ symbol to just suppress warnings. Can you think of any reason why that would be a really bad idea? It's either that or your second solution below. –  Jonathan Mar 10 '12 at 22:29
1  
Generally speaking, you really really want to avoid the @ operator, because it basically amounts to sweeping an error message under the rug. In this particular case it probably isn't going to lead to issues long-term, but you can't count on that because E_STRICT warnings are indications that the language may change at some point to no-longer support what you're doing. I'm not sure you could use it to suppress errors in a method declaration anyway. You could set an error_reporting value that excludes E_STRICT, though again that's just sweeping the problem under the carpet. –  GordonM Mar 11 '12 at 7:35
    
PHP's manual has this to say on E_STRICT: In PHP 5 a new error level E_STRICT is available. As E_STRICT is not included within E_ALL you have to explicitly enable this kind of error level. Enabling E_STRICT during development has some benefits. STRICT messages will help you to use the latest and greatest suggested method of coding, for example warn you about using deprecated functions. So I'd say the best approach is to turn off E_STRICT on your production server, but leave it on on your dev/test machhine. –  GordonM Mar 11 '12 at 7:40
    
+1 for detailing an aspect of the Liskov Substitution Principle. –  Frederik Krautwald Jul 25 at 21:20

You can consider to switch to Hack and HHVM. It is developed by Facebook and full compatible to PHP. You can decide to use <?php or <?hh

It support that what you want:

http://docs.hhvm.com/manual/en/hack.generics.php

I know this is not PHP. But it is combatible to it, and also improves your performance dramaticly.

share|improve this answer

Whatever the Java world invented need not be always right. I think I detected a violation of the Liskov substitution principle here, and PHP is right in complaining about it in E_STRICT mode:

Cite Wikipedia: "If S is a subtype of T, then objects of type T in a program may be replaced with objects of type S without altering any of the desirable properties of that program."

T is your Controller. S is your ExtendedController. You should be able to use the ExtendedController in every place where the Controller works without breaking anything. Changing the typehint on the addModel() method breaks things, because in every place that passed an object of type Model, the typehint will now prevent passing the same object if it isn't accidentally a ReOrderableModel.

How to escape this?

Your ExtendedController can leave the typehint as is and check afterwards whether he got an instance of ReOrderableModel or not. This circumvents the PHP complaints, but it still breaks things in terms of the Liskov substitution.

A better way is to create a new method addReOrderableModel() designed to inject ReOrderableModel objects into the ExtendedController. This method can have the typehint you need, and can internally just call addModel() to put the model in place where it is expected.

If you require an ExtendedController to be used instead of a Controller as parameter, you know that your method for adding ReOrderableModel is present and can be used. You explicitly declare that the Controller will not fit in this case. Every method that expects a Controller to be passed will not expect addReOrderableModel() to exist and never attempt to call it. Every method that expects ExtendedController has the right to call this method, because it must be there.

class ExtendedController extends Controller
{
  public function addReOrderableModel(ReOrderableModel $model)
  {
    return $this->addModel($model);
  }
}
share|improve this answer

My workaround is the following:

/**
 * Generic list logic and an abstract type validator method.
 */    
abstract class AbstractList {
    protected $elements;

    public function __construct() {
        $this->elements = array();
    }

    public function add($element) {
        $this->validateType($element);
        $this->elements[] = $element;
    }

    public function get($index) {
        if ($index >= sizeof($this->elements)) {
            throw new OutOfBoundsException();
        }
        return $this->elements[$index];
    }

    public function size() {
        return sizeof($this->elements);
    }

    public function remove($element) {
        validateType($element);
        for ($i = 0; $i < sizeof($this->elements); $i++) {
            if ($this->elements[$i] == $element) {
               unset($this->elements[$i]);
            }
        }
    }

    protected abstract function validateType($element);
}


/**
 * Extends the abstract list with the type-specific validation
 */
class MyTypeList extends AbstractList {
    protected function validateType($element) {
        if (!($element instanceof MyType)) {
            throw new InvalidArgumentException("Parameter must be MyType instance");
        }
    }
}

/**
 * Just an example class as a subject to validation.
 */
class MyType {
    // blahblahblah
}


function proofOfConcept(AbstractList $lst) {
    $lst->add(new MyType());
    $lst->add("wrong type"); // Should throw IAE
}

proofOfConcept(new MyTypeList());

Though this still differs from Java generics, it pretty much minimalizes the extra code needed for mimicking the behaviour.

Also, it is a bit more code than some examples given by others, but - at least to me - it seems to be more clean (and more simliar to the Java counterpart) than most of them.

I hope some of you will find it useful.

Any improvements over this design are welcome!

share|improve this answer
1  
I guess you should have added code to one of the SPL classes of PHP, like ArrayObject or SplDoublyLinkedList –  Sven Oct 21 '12 at 17:51
    
@Sven Well, yes. Also, it is obviously not a complete inteface that Java List<?> offers, but a subset that is most often used. It also can be further improved by introducing an AbstractValidatedList class that implements the validator, but calls into the children for an abstract getElementType() method that returns the class name. I'm slightly out of date with PHP as I've been working almost exclusively with J2EE over my last year. Thanks for pointing things out! –  Powerslave Oct 21 '12 at 20:05
1  
The question is not about lists, I think. It's about inheritance in PHP. –  Sven Oct 21 '12 at 22:08
    
@Sven Well, the basic concept can be applied to other classes as you like. The main difference compared to Java generics is that you'll get runtime errors but no IDE will complain about type mismatch. –  Powerslave Oct 22 '12 at 1:56
    
If I understand correctly, Java generics are just a creative form of templating that is resolved into separate classes at compile time. You type your code once, create it as a template, and apply this template to several uses. PHP does not really support this approach, besides the fact that traits are essentially a compiler-resolved copy&paste solution for something that may be used here. I wouldn't recommend using traits, though. –  Sven Oct 23 '12 at 21:36

Don't use type hinting at all. PHP does not require it.

Then, if you must, check for the object type inside of the method using is_a() or the instanceof operator.

share|improve this answer
3  
Or the more modern instanceof operator. –  deceze Mar 10 '12 at 12:37
    
See the comment I left on my post. I am aware that PHP doesn't require type hinting and this solution is the most plausible but also the least OOP friendly which means it has a few important weaknesses. Thanks anyway though and I may well resort to this if I cannot find a solution. –  Jonathan Mar 10 '12 at 13:23
4  
@truth Type hinting is far too useful a feature to just ignore, not only does it stop you passing invalid arguments to a method, it also has benefits in IDEs that understand PHP code such as code completion. A better approach is have the typehint be for the superclass, and then do your is_a or instanceof trick for testing for specific subclasses. It's also not ideal, but it's a better compromise than not using typehints at all. –  GordonM Mar 10 '12 at 13:50
    
I strongly disagree with this advice, especially for framework/library type code. –  markus Mar 10 '12 at 14:10
2  
@markus-tharkun Type hinting is very nice indeed. This so-called generic programming was invented in Java to solve this specific problem, that the OP is asking about. PHP solved this problem by default by not requiring type-hinting. I see no reason to insist on something as long as it's constricting you and disabling your inheritance. It's great for parsing and it is indeed a positive feature, up until the moment where it causes problems, that's when it goes away. –  Second Rikudo Mar 10 '12 at 14:24

I did went through the same type of problem before. And I used something like this to tackle it.

Class Myclass {

    $objectParent = "MyMainParent"; //Define the interface or abstract class or the main parent class here
    public function method($classObject) {
        if(!$classObject instanceof $this -> objectParent) { //check 
             throw new Exception("Invalid Class Identified");
        }
        // Carry on with the function
    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
Creative solution! I might do this in conjunction with the type hint. So it type checks the superclass and then does manual checking for the subclass. –  Jonathan Mar 10 '12 at 23:09
    
@jonathan, if you typecast a superclass then the object passed must be the object of that class. Which is exactly why, my solution does not use it, instead, checks the instance later on to verify it. –  Starx Mar 10 '12 at 23:17
    
What I mean is that addModel(Model $model) will check if it is a Model but then in the method body I can manually check by doing if($model instanceof ReOrderableModel). ReOrderableModel extends Model so it would be allowed through the addModel(Model $model) method. Are you saying that this wouldn't work? –  Jonathan Mar 10 '12 at 23:29

PHP is a Dynamic language, so you don't need to use type annotations. Take a look at the new feature introduced in version 5.4: Traits

share|improve this answer
    
You should explain what you mean with this comment. –  Sven Oct 21 '12 at 17:05

You can do it dirtily by passing the type as a second argument of the constructor

<?php class Collection implements IteratorAggregate{
      private $type;
      private $container;
      public function __construct(array $collection, $type='Object'){
          $this->type = $type;
          foreach($collection as $value){
             if(!($value instanceof $this->type)){
                 throw new RuntimeException('bad type for your collection');
             }  
          }
          $this->container = new \ArrayObject($collection);
      }
      public function getIterator(){
         return $this->container->getIterator();
      }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
This is an interesting solution! Like Starx's solution except the class is passed as a parameter nice. –  Jonathan Mar 10 '12 at 23:18

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.