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I'm working on writing a splash screen that returns a game mode (int) and an IP address (string). The idea is the splash screen runs, takes user input and then runs the main game with these options. I'm using a thread to achieve this - the thread polls for an exit request from the splash screen, then pulls the values out to program.cs and calls exit() on splash.

The main game runs on it's own with no issues but with the splash screen enabled the game runs just 1 frame and seems to be disposed of by garbage collection after running the update method. (returns a DisposedObjectException or something of the sort if trying to reference it) After a bit of debugging I've found the issue is with the exit command. Code is as follows:

using System;
using System.Threading;

namespace SplashScreen
{
    static class Program
    {
        /// <summary>
        /// The main entry point for the application.
        /// </summary>
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            int choice = 0;
            string ip = "";
            bool runSplash = true;
            bool useThreading = true;
            bool ignoreThreadResponse = false;
            // Debug option, toggle running splash screen
            if (runSplash == true)
            {
                bool splashrunning = true;
                using (Splash1 splash = new Splash1())
                {
                    if (useThreading)
                    {
                        // Run a thread to poll whether the splash screen has requested an exit every 0.5 seconds
                        Thread t = new Thread(() =>
                        {
                            while (splashrunning)
                            {
                                // If splash requests exit pull gameMode choice and IP Address before killing it, then quit this thread
                                if (splash.requestingExit)
                                {
                                    choice = splash.choice;
                                    ip = splash.ip;
                                    // The offending piece of code, without this you can simply select an option, force close and second part runs fine
                                    //splash.Exit();
                                    splashrunning = false;
                                }
                                Thread.Sleep(500);
                            }
                        });
                        t.Start();
                    }
                    splash.Run();
                }
            }
            // If splash screen is not running, assign default values
            if(!useThreading || !runSplash || ignoreThreadResponse)
            {
                choice = 2;
                ip = "127.0.0.1";
            }
            if (choice != 0)
            {
                // This game is picked up by garbage collection after running Update once
                using (Game1 game = new Game1(choice, ip))
                {
                    game.Run();
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

When splash.Exit() is called, it causes game1 to be collected after the first update. If I disable threading it works fine. If I exit using the X at the top right it works fine. Whether or not I ignore the thread response the game fails to run if threading is enabled and I call splash.Exit().

What I'm looking for is any of the following:

  • A reason why the second game is being collected.

  • An alternative way to exit a game or call the 'close window' (big red x) function.

  • A better way of implementing this.

I've used console input to do this in the past, but I want to move on to using a graphical interface instead of an ugly command prompt for the user.

Edit:
Turns out I was almost there. While GSM is probably the correct way of doing things, for anyone who just wants to grab the code from the question and throw caution to the wind you simply need to add a thread to run the second game.
I'm pretty sure this isn't ideal, but it's a lot less tweaking in my case.

Thread gt = new Thread(() =>
{
    using (Game1 game = new Game1(choice, ip))
    {
        game.Run();
    }
});
gt.Start();

So while I'd recommend anyone starting from scratch to use GSM, this might be a quick solution for someone else just trying to get it running.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

What does your Splash class look like? Exit is a method of the Game class, and exits the game. Is your Splash class inheriting Game? If so, it shouldn't.

Edit:

After reading the bottom half of your post a bit more clearly - you should only have a single class that inherits from Game, and it should run your game. If you want to display a splash screen it should be a custom class, or look into the Game State Management sample.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the response and yes, they both inherit from Game. Is there any technical/design reason why this is bad practice or is just because of glitches like this? I ask because it works fine without the extra thread. –  kiliki Mar 10 '12 at 13:01
    
I should clarify - when I say 'glitches' I mostly mean my own lack of knowledge. My reasoning is that 2 different classes inheriting from Game should just create 2 different Games. If anyone has a reason why destroying one destroys the other I'd like to hear it but I have an answer and will look into GSM as an option, marking the question as answered. –  kiliki Mar 10 '12 at 13:33
    
In pretty much every case, when you make a game you're making a single game. The Game class is intended to run your game. So why would you ever have more than one? The XNA framework was designed with that assumption, so among other things that that implies, when you Exit() the game, you're exiting the game application. The Game class also deals with the graphics device, and that resource can only be owned by one "game" at a time. The game loop is handled by the Game class as well, so you have issues there with multiple instances. –  Crappy Coding Guy Mar 10 '12 at 14:00
    
Ok thanks, that clears things up. –  kiliki Mar 10 '12 at 14:11

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