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How to find the vertical sum of a binary tree.

For example, Consider the binary tree below,

                      1
                    /  \
                   /    \
                  /      \
                 2        3
                / \      / \
               /   \    /   \
               4   5    6    7
              / \ / \  / \  / \
             5  9 1  3 6 7 5   5

For the above tree, Vertical sum should be calculated as follows,

  • Line 1: 5
  • Line 2: 4
  • Line 3: 2,9,1
  • Line 4: 5
  • Line 5: 1,3,6
  • Line 6: 6
  • Line 7: 3,7,5
  • Line 8: 7
  • Line 9: 5

Output should be:

5,4,12,5,10,6,15,7,5
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closed as not a real question by Lasse V. Karlsen Mar 10 '12 at 22:27

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
How you are calculating the sum? how its vertical? –  shiplu.mokadd.im Mar 10 '12 at 13:03
    
I have edited the question. Please find the vertical lines. –  Anantha Krishnan Mar 10 '12 at 13:14
2  
It's not clear to me how are the vertical lines defined. Could you show it for a tree with one more level? –  svick Mar 10 '12 at 13:37
    
Why do nodes 1, 5 and 6 count as being in the same column? Would 5 and 6 still count as being in that column if there were another level in the tree? –  Weeble Mar 10 '12 at 13:55
1  
This question is far from clear. Why is line 5 the same as 1,3,6? How did you arrive at "1,3,6"? –  Lasse V. Karlsen Mar 10 '12 at 14:27

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

First you should find the positions, you can do this by counting number of left and rights spend to reach specific node:

                 1     : l = 0, r = 0
                / \
               /   \
      l=1,r=0 2     3  : l = 0, r = 1.
             / \   / \
     ...    4...5 6...7 ....

Simply you can traverse your binary tree and finally calculate LorR = NumberOfLeft - NumberOfRights for each node, then group this numbers (by their LorR value) together and find each groups sum (print them from most positive to most negative value of LorR).

Update: This doesn't answers for tree of height more than two, we can fix this problem with little modification in algorithm.

We can see tree as pyramid, each vertex of pyramid has length 1, after each branch remaining part of branch is equal to what passed in latest move, we show this in picture for tree of height 3:

                  1
                /  \
               /    \
              /      \
             2        3    upto this we used 1/2 size of pyramid
            / \      / \
           /   \    /   \
           4   5    6    7  upto this we used 1/2 + 1/4 part of pyramid
          / \ / \  / \  / \
         5  9 1  3 6 7 5   5  upto this we used 1/2 + 1/4 + 1/4 part of pyramid

This means in each step we calculate left values by their height (in fact each time multiply of 1/2 will be added to left value, except last time, which is equal to h-1 st value).

So for this case we have: 1 in root is in group 0, 3 in leaf is in group -1/2 + 1/4 + 1/4 = 0, 6 in leaf is in group 1/2 - 1/4 - 1/4 = 0

1 in leaf is in -1/2 + 1/4 - 1/4 = -1/2 and so on.

For preventing from rounding of 1/(2^x) to zero or other problems we can multiply our factors (1/2, 1/4, 1/8,...) to 2h-1. In fact in the first case I wrote we can say factors are multiplied by 22-1.

Related Pyramid for tree of height 4

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Interesting. Checking your algorithm. Thank you. –  Anantha Krishnan Mar 10 '12 at 13:16
    
I think your algorithm will not work for binary trees with height more than 2. –  Anantha Krishnan Mar 10 '12 at 13:21
1  
I edited answer this works for all cases. –  Saeed Amiri Mar 10 '12 at 22:22
    
Can you check your algorithm for trees with height 5. –  Anantha Krishnan Mar 12 '12 at 11:07
    
@AnanthaKrishnan, Just add one row of triangles with edges of size 1/16 (you can do it in corresponding image), It works fine. In fact it's general. –  Saeed Amiri Mar 12 '12 at 11:12

A brute force method in pseudocode:

columnAdd(tree):
  sumPerColumn = new Map<int,int>();
  traverse(tree.root, sumPerColumn, 0);
  return sumPerColumn;

traverse(node, sumPerColumn, currentColumn):
  sumPerColumn[currentColumn] ++;
  traverse(node.left, sumPerColumn, currentColumn-1);
  traverse(node.right, sumPerColumn, currentColumn+1);

this would yield:

  {-2: 4,
   -1: 2,
    0: 12,
    1: 3,
    2: 7}
share|improve this answer
    
I think you meant currentColumn - 1 and currentColumn + 1, not -- and ++. –  svick Mar 10 '12 at 13:38
    
@svick: Yes, that is probably clearer and 'more correct' :). I'll change it. –  Alexander Torstling Mar 10 '12 at 13:46

As far as i understood moving left is -1, moving right is +1. You can use modified dfs. Here is assume that add(col, value) is defined

dfs(col, node)
begin
  add(col, node.value)
  if(haveLeft)
     dfs(col-1, left)
  if(haveRight)
     dfs(col+1, right)
end

Assuming, that add works in O(1) (using HashMap or simple array for example), this works in O(n).

share|improve this answer
    
nice solution....... –  Student Arya Mar 23 '12 at 19:39

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