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I’m a R beginner and having difficulty with the following pretty simple problem; I have two data frames ( All_df, Bad_df) and want to generate a third such that All_df – Bad_df = Good_df

> All_df
Row# Originator Recipient  Date          Time
4    1          6          2000-05-16   16:15:00
7    2          7          2000-05-16   16:25:00
22   2          4          2000-07-04   18:05:00
25   2          9          2000-08-07   05:23:00
10   3          2          2000-06-17   18:07:00
13   4          8          2000-06-21   06:49:00 

> Bad_df
Row# Originator    Recipient       Date     Time
4    2             6         2000-05-16 16:15:00
7    2             7         2000-05-16 16:25:00
22   6             4         2000-07-04 18:05:00
25   12            9         2000-08-07 05:23:00
10   30            2         2000-06-17 18:07:00
13   32            8         2000-06-21 06:49:00 



I want to generate Good_df  similar to this:

> Good_df
Row#    Originator Recipient       Date     Time
4        1         6               2000-05-16   16:15:00
10       3         2               2000-06-17   18:07:00
13       4         8               2000-06-21   06:49:00 

Essentially I need a function which searches All_df$ Originator for values that appear in Bad_df$ Originator, eliminating any matches before returning the remaining values to the Good_df.

I have tried

Good_df <-subset(All_df, Originator %in% Bad_df$Originator) 

however nrows of each df looks a little off!

> nrow(All_df)
[1] 26,032
> nrow(Bad_df)
[1] 1,452
> nrow(Good_df)
[1] 12,395

Any assistance would be greatly appreciated.

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Do you mean Good_df <-subset(All_df, ! Originator %in% Bad_df$Originator)? Note the exclamation mark. –  flodel Mar 10 '12 at 13:39
1  
@flodel. Looks like an answer. Why not post? Could comment on why duplicates could have an effect on the totals question. –  BondedDust Mar 10 '12 at 14:24

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Quite intuitively,

Good_df <-subset(All_df, Originator %in% Bad_df$Originator)

gives you the subset of All_df for bad originators. What you want is to negate your filter to get the subset of good (or non-bad) originators, using the ! operator:

Good_df <-subset(All_df, ! Originator %in% Bad_df$Originator)

If you are uncomfortable with the precedency rule, you can add a set of parenthesis:

Good_df <-subset(All_df, !(Originator %in% Bad_df$Originator))
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for clarifying this @flodel. Any suggestions to the cause of the problem with nrows count? –  Sean Mc Mar 15 '12 at 11:20
    
@SeanMc, it's like @DWin mentioned above, your data.frames apparently have duplicate values for Originator. In addition to nrow(df) you may want to look at length(unique(df$Originator)) to get a full picture. –  flodel Mar 16 '12 at 2:15
    
cheers for all the help. I’ve found the source of the duplications, bit of a stupid mistake. $Originator and $Recipient were originally email addresses, I needed to generate unique identification numbers for each so I naively used the as.numeric function! Would you be as kind to suggest a method for generating unique numeric identifiers for each email address in $Originator and $Recipient, bearing in mind that any given email address could appear a number of times in each column?? –  Sean Mc Mar 16 '12 at 16:15

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