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I need to test whether each item in an array is identical to each other. For example:

var list = ["l","r","b"]

Should evaluate as false, because each item is not identical. On the other hand this:

var list = ["b", "b", "b"]

Should evaluate as true because they are all identical. What would be the most efficient (in speed/resources) way of achieving this?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted
function identical(array) {
    for(var i = 0; i < array.length - 1; i++) {
        if(array[i] != array[i+1]) {
            return false;
        }
    }
    return true;
}
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1  
I opted for this solution, thanks. Pimvdb had a very elegant solution with array.every but that would of required adding a big chunk of code (for non-ES5 compliant browser support) to an already large document for just one instance of .every so I opted for this instead. –  Nick Mar 10 '12 at 17:13

In ES5, you could do:

arr.every(function(v, i, a) {
   // first item: nothing to compare with (and, single element arrays should return true)
   // otherwise:  compare current value to previous value
   return i === 0 || v === a[i - 1];
});

.every does short-circuit as well.

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1  
Nice, didn't know this existed and going to start using this myself. Just adding a pointer to the docs for array.every developer.mozilla.org/en/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/… –  Shane Mar 10 '12 at 14:10
    
Thanks, that's a very elegant solution. I went for Dogberts solution in the end to avoid adding the array.every code to support older browsers - but in principle this would have worked nicely. –  Nick Mar 10 '12 at 17:15
function matchList(list) {
  var listItem = list[0];

  for (index in list) {
    if(list[index] != listItem {
       return false;
    }
  }

  return true;
}
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1  
it will fail at the last element of the array. –  Gonzalo Larralde Mar 10 '12 at 13:52
    
Yeah I just noticed that. –  Jivings Mar 10 '12 at 13:53
1  
Edited to work now. –  Jivings Mar 10 '12 at 13:55
var list = ["b", "b", "b"];
var checkItem = list[0];
var isSame = true;
for (var i = 0; i < list.length; i++) {
  if (list[i] != checkItem) {
    isSame = false;
    break;
  }
}
return isSame;
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Just return false when you first encounter it. –  Jivings Mar 10 '12 at 13:54
    
Yeah, I wasn't sure if the OP wanted it for use later, or returned in a function. –  Waynn Lue Mar 10 '12 at 13:56

My suggestion would be to remove duplicates (check out Easiest way to find duplicate values in a JavaScript array), and then check to see if the length == 1. That would mean that all items were the same.

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2  
That would be O(n^2) (or O(n log n) depending on the sorting algorithm). Too slow. –  Dogbert Mar 10 '12 at 13:55
    
I was actually suggesting the second answer (should have specified), that remove duplicates without sorting. –  Kory Sharp Mar 10 '12 at 15:09
function allEqual(list)
{
    if(list.length == 0 || list.length == 1)
    {
      return true;
    }

    for (index in list) {
    if(list[index] != list[index+1] {
       return false;
    }
  }

  return true;

}
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1  
Like my first answer: it will fail at the last element of the array. –  Jivings Mar 10 '12 at 13:59

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