Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Possible Duplicate:
How can I get jQuery to perform a synchronous, rather than asynchronous, AJAX request?
how to wait for an ajax call to return

Hear me out. I completely understand this code segment.

$.getJSON(someURL, function(data){
    //do something with my data
})
.success(function () {
    //Call what you want on success
})

This seems fine if I just need to take one action that is pretty static. However, what if I want to be less restricted, for instance this

function my_func(){
    $.getJSON(someURL, function(data){
        //do something with my data... like modify an array or the dom
    })
}

Now the driver

my_func();
//Now I want to call a function that relies on the data that my_func brought into the script.

Is there something wrong with the way I'm coding my script if I want to do it like this? Or am I just missing some awesome built in method?

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by PeeHaa, ircmaxell, outis, Andrew Marshall, Rhino Mar 11 '12 at 13:45

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
But that is what the success callback is for...any particular reason why it would not work for you? In what way do you need to be less restricted? –  Vincent Ramdhanie Mar 10 '12 at 14:59
    
use async:false flag. –  kirilloid Mar 10 '12 at 15:00
    
"Or am I just missing some awesome built in method?" Yup: api.jquery.com/jQuery.ajax with async: false –  PeeHaa Mar 10 '12 at 15:00
1  
Your page will appear to suck and act like it's locking up. Any idea why you are seeking this "feature"? –  Kirk Woll Mar 10 '12 at 15:02
1  
@Jake, making your calls synchronous (no callbacks) is with almost no exception a terrible idea. You should categorically not be going down this road to "clean up your code." –  Kirk Woll Mar 10 '12 at 18:06

3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

I see two possible jQuery-ish ways there.

The first would be to use another callback that can be passed to my_func:

function my_func(callback) {
    $.getJSON(someUrl, function(data) {
        // ...do stuff ...
        if ($.isFunction(callback)) { callback(data); }
    });
}

my_func(function(data) {
    // ..do more stuff..
});

The second way would be to create a custom event that gets triggered inside my_func and can be listened to from the outside:

function my_func() {
    $.getJSON(someUrl, function(data) {
        $(document).triggerHandler('my_func:data-received', [data]);
    });
}

$(document).on('my_func:data-received', function(event, data) {
    // ...do stuff...
});

my_func();

I strongly recommend using async: false only if it is absolutely necessary.


Just another (very neat) way to deal with this is the jQuery.Deferred object:

function my_func() {
    var d = new $.Deferred();
    $.getJSON(someUrl, function(data) {
        d.resolve(data);
    });
    return d;
}

my_func().done(function(data) {
    // ...do stuff...
});

Your function returns an object that allows to register callbacks. Within the function you then just need to make sure to call resolve to invoke all registered done callback handlers.

share|improve this answer
    
Deferred! I knew I had heard of something about that. I think I heard a speech on the topic at last years jquery summit.. I should go find the recordings. Woohoo! –  Jake Mar 10 '12 at 15:26

You'd probably pass your function that runs on the data to my_func().

 //                    v--------receive a callback
function my_func(callback_fn){

    $.getJSON(someURL, callback_fn); // use the callback as the getJSON callback

}

then...

my_func(function(data) {
    // do something with data
})

...or if the function you wanted to call was a named function, then of course you'd pass it by name...

my_func(someOtherFunction)

Either way, your my_func() function will use it as the callback to the $.getJSON call, which will invoke it when the data arrives.

share|improve this answer
    
You know it's an exact dupe of a dupe of a dupe right? –  PeeHaa Mar 10 '12 at 15:04
    
@PeeHaa: Sure. Nearly everything is a dupe. –  squint Mar 10 '12 at 15:05
    
Yup that's why we have the close as exact dupe option. –  PeeHaa Mar 10 '12 at 15:09
2  
@PeeHaa: We should just shut down StackOverflow (as in freeze in current state). There's plenty of information here to answer 99% of questions. Fact is that dupes are rarely closed, so I've given up. –  squint Mar 10 '12 at 15:12
    
@PeeHaa: If you were concerned that I'm rep-whoring... don't be. I don't care about rep. If you can find a way for me to easily transfer most of mine to you, I'd be happy to do it. (Just want to keep enough to avoid the ads, and be able to vote and comment and such.) –  squint Mar 10 '12 at 15:18

Then there's the XHR object:

var jqXHR = $.getJSON(someURL);

You can access it anywhere after it is defined:

jqXHR.always(function() {
    alert('JSON IS COMLETE');
});

jqXHR.done(function(data) {
    //do something with the returned data if success!
});

jqXHR.fail(function(jqXHR, textStatus) {
    alert('JSON FAILED : '+textStatus);
});

FIDDLE

You could even do something like this:

$("#button").on('click', Myfunc);

function Myfunc() {
    var jqXHR = runAjax();
        jqXHR.done(function(data) {
            alert($.parseJSON(data));
            $("#result").html('JSON IS DONE');
        });
}

function runAjax() {
    return $.getJSON(someURL);
}

FIDDLE

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.