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i was asked this question in an interview, and it literally cost me a job :P the interviewer asked, that you will be given the root to a tree and you have to return the root to the copied tree, but the copy should be made in an iterative manner. i am pasting my code here, i wrote the same there, and it works fine. I initially did this using two stacks, which the interviewer said he didn't like, then i did it in the following way. The interviewer was kinda unhappy about me using another structure that holds pointer to the original and final tree (refer code). I am wondering is there any other, better way to do this??

struct node
{
   int data;
   struct node * left;
   struct node * right;

};

struct copynode
{
   node * original;
   node * final;
};

node * copy(node *root)
{
    stack <copynode*> s;
    copynode * temp=(copynode*)malloc(sizeof(copynode));
    temp->original=root;
    temp->final=(node *)malloc(sizeof(node));
    s.push(temp);
    while(s.empty()==false)
    {
       copynode * i;
       i=s.top();
       s.pop();
       i->final=i->original;
       if(i->original->left)
       {
          copynode *left=(copynode*)malloc(sizeof(copynode));
          left->original=i->original->left;
          left->final=(node *)malloc(sizeof(node));
          s.push(left);
       }
       if(i->original->right)
       {
          copynode *right=(copynode*)malloc(sizeof(copynode));
          right->original=i->original->right;
          right->final=(node *)malloc(sizeof(node));
          s.push(right);
       }
   }  
   return temp->final;
}
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5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted

If you're allowed to have parent pointers in each node, you don't even need stack:

Walk the original tree and the tree you're creating in parallel. If the current node in the original tree has a left child, but the node in the tree you're creating doesn't, create it and descend left. Similarly with right children. If neither condition applies, go up.

In code (C#):

public static Node Clone(Node original)
{
    if (original == null)
        return null;

    var root = new Node(original.Data, null);
    var clone = root;

    while (original != null)
    {
        if (original.Left != null && clone.Left == null)
        {
            clone.Left = new Node(original.Left.Data, clone);
            original = original.Left;
            clone = clone.Left;
        }
        else if (original.Right != null && clone.Right == null)
        {
            clone.Right = new Node(original.Right.Data, clone);
            original = original.Right;
            clone = clone.Right;
        }
        else
        {
            original = original.Parent;
            clone = clone.Parent;
        }
    }

    return root;
}
share|improve this answer
    
yeah, since i did make another structure, i could have as well done this , thanks!! –  Raman Bhatia Mar 10 '12 at 17:14

two ideas:

  1. you need either a stack or parent links to traverse the input tree (afaict). so let's assume that the interviewer would be happy with one of those. what is left to simplify?

    in your code you also traverse the copy storing its nodes in parallel with your original. instead, you could simply add nodes to the copy's root. as long as you chose the traversal of the original correctly, you would end up with the same structure.

    and it's not hard to see that pre-order traversal would do this (assuming no re-balancing on addition).

    so you could write your copy in terms of pre-order traversal plus simple addition to the copy root. this would give simpler code and/or allow re-use, at the cost of being less efficient (you have O(nlog(n)) extra "hops" to find the correct places in your copy on insertion).

  2. for immutable nodes, you only need to copy the root (this is normal functional style).

my gut feeling is that (1) may be what he was looking for, given the reference to "properties of a tree".

share|improve this answer
    
can you please elaborate the first part.. i mean, what do you mean by " add nodes to the copy's root. "?? could you give a brief algo for that?? –  Raman Bhatia Mar 11 '12 at 7:58
    
just call the normal subroutine that you would call when adding a new value to the tree. it starts at the root and branches down through the tree until it adds a new leaf node. –  andrew cooke Mar 11 '12 at 12:17
    
but it ain't a BST, how will that work? –  Raman Bhatia Mar 11 '12 at 12:32
    
oh, sorry, i assumed it was. [edit:] if it's not, how are nodes added? depending on what the algorithm is. this may still work with the correct traversal. –  andrew cooke Mar 11 '12 at 12:40
    
well,that has not been given, you just have the tree with you, that's it!! –  Raman Bhatia Mar 11 '12 at 13:00

The first code segment is the solution. The second segment is a file you can copy, paste, and run to see the solution at work.

SOLUTION:

public Node clone() {
    if(null == root)
        return null;
    Queue<Node> queue = new LinkedList<Node>();
    queue.add(root);
    Node n;

    Queue<Node> q2 = new LinkedList<Node>();
    Node fresh;
    Node root2 = new Node(root.data);
    q2.add(root2);

    while(!queue.isEmpty()) {
        n=queue.remove();
        fresh = q2.remove();
        if(null != n.left) {
            queue.add(n.left);
            fresh.left = new Node(n.left.data);
            q2.add(fresh.left);
        }
        if(null != n.right) {
            queue.add(n.right);
            fresh.right= new Node(n.right.data);
            q2.add(fresh.right);
        }           
    }       
    return root2;
}//

PROGRAM FILE:

import java.util.LinkedList;
import java.util.Queue;

public class BST {
Node root;

public BST() {
    root = null;
}

public void insert(int el) {

    Node tmp = root, p = null;
    while (null != tmp && el != tmp.data) {
        p = tmp;
        if (el < tmp.data)
            tmp = tmp.left;
        else
            tmp = tmp.right;
    }
    if (tmp == null) {
        if (null == p)
            root = new Node(el);
        else if (el < p.data)
            p.left = new Node(el);
        else
            p.right = new Node(el);
    }
}//

public Node clone() {
    if(null == root)
        return null;
    Queue<Node> queue = new LinkedList<Node>();
    queue.add(root);
    Node n;

    Queue<Node> q2 = new LinkedList<Node>();
    Node fresh;
    Node root2 = new Node(root.data);
    q2.add(root2);

    while(!queue.isEmpty()) {
        n=queue.remove();
        fresh = q2.remove();
        if(null != n.left) {
            queue.add(n.left);
            fresh.left = new Node(n.left.data);
            q2.add(fresh.left);
        }
        if(null != n.right) {
            queue.add(n.right);
            fresh.right= new Node(n.right.data);
            q2.add(fresh.right);
        }           
    }       
    return root2;
}//

private void inOrder(Node n) {
    if(null == n) return;
    inOrder(n.left);
    System.out.format("%d;", n.data);
    inOrder(n.right);
}//

public static void main(String[] args) {
    int[] input = { 50, 25, 75, 10, 35, 60, 100, 5, 20, 30, 45, 55, 70, 90,
            102 };
    BST bst = new BST();
    for (int i : input)
        bst.insert(i);
    Node root2 = bst.clone();
    bst.inOrder(root2);
}
}

class Node {
public int data;
public Node left;
public Node right;

public Node(int el) {
    data = el;
}
}
share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the input, but i see you have used two queues, i was wondering if some better space complexity is possible for this!! –  Raman Bhatia Mar 10 '12 at 17:07
    
Traveling a tree in level order (aka Breadth First Search) will always require a queue. In fact all BST traversals require either stacks or queues whether implicit or explicit. As far as space complexity, note that together the two queues worst case for a BST with n nodes is: 2(n/2+1) = n+2 = O(n): that's the worst case of the entire algorithm! So if you were not cloning traversal would take you O(n); cloning with this algorithm still takes you O(n)! –  kasavbere Mar 11 '12 at 14:44
    
Note that the O(n) is referring to space complexity -- although time complexity is also O(n) –  kasavbere Mar 11 '12 at 15:50
    
okay, how come it is 2(n/2+1)??? you are pushing every node inside the queue once for the original tree and once for the final tree, so it is 2(n)... now agreed, the space complexity is O(n), but so is in the case of my solution. –  Raman Bhatia Mar 11 '12 at 16:41
    
"how come it is 2(n/2+1)???" It's not. I was tutoring someone about printing a tree by level while answering your question. –  kasavbere Mar 11 '12 at 17:59

One method without recursion would be to walk through each node, and if the node contains a right branch, push that right node onto a stack. When you run out of nodes along your path (following only those nodes with left branches), pop the top node off the stack and follow it using the same rules (push the right, then follow the left). Repeat this loop until your stack is empty. This should only require a single stack.

Edit: Did you ask the interviewer what method s/he was looking for? If not, you should have, in a manner that suggests your willingness to learn new things and you should have tried to make it a two-way dialog. I'm sure you do have that willingness to learn new things (or you would not have posted here), but did your interviewer know this? Keep in mind -- interviewers are generally not looking for a specific answer to things, but rather they're looking to evaluate your approach to solving them, and not purely in a technical manner. If you didn't engage this way, you made it impossible for the interviewer to consider that you don't know everything but are able to learn and might make a great addition to their team.

share|improve this answer
    
looking back to your approach, if i push the right child of any node, traverse along its left branch, and later face a NULL, i am left with a stack with a right child pushed in, but how do i determine which node's right child is it, so that i can properly make the same insertion in the final tree??? ps: yes, i did ask the interviewer, and he was just like "you are forgetting some basic property of trees, that would make the solution easy", and never figured out what property he was referring to. –  Raman Bhatia Mar 10 '12 at 17:12
    
and then what?? once the left branch has been traversed, we need to look up in the stack, make a search for that node in the copied tree, and proceed.. the searching further increases the complexity man!!! –  Raman Bhatia Mar 10 '12 at 17:45
    
I think to solve the "where did this node come from?" problem you may need to deal with pushing a meta-node instead. The meta-node would include the original node as well as a position it belongs in. I do not know offhand what the "basic property to make the solution easy" is, but I suspect it's something that would immediately make sense. –  mah Mar 10 '12 at 17:47
    
and i am puzzled too :) but, thanks for your inputs, always nice to know new ways!!! –  Raman Bhatia Mar 10 '12 at 17:58

Here is my working code :

For each node keep pushing left first, one done pushing left nodes, push the right node and then repeat the same.

#include <iostream>
#include <stack>

using namespace std;

struct Node {
    Node() 
    : left(NULL), right(NULL) {}
    int val;
    Node *left;
    Node *right;
};

struct Wrap {
    Wrap()
    : oldNode(NULL), newNode(NULL), flags(0) {}
    Node *oldNode;
    Node *newNode;
    int flags;
};

void InOrder(Node *node) {
    if(node == NULL) {
        return;
    }
    InOrder(node->left);
    cout << node->val << " ";
    InOrder(node->right);
}

Node *AllocNode(int val) {
    Node *p = new Node;
    p->val = val;
    return p;
}

Wrap *AllocWrap(Node *old) {
    Wrap *wrap = new Wrap;

    Node *newNode = new Node;
    newNode->val = old->val;

    wrap->oldNode = old;
    wrap->newNode = newNode;

    return wrap;
}

Wrap* PushLeftNodes(stack<Wrap*> &stk) {

    Wrap *curWrap = stk.top();  
    while(((curWrap->flags & 1) == 0) && (curWrap->oldNode->left != NULL)) {
        curWrap->flags |= 1;
        Wrap *newWrap = AllocWrap(curWrap->oldNode->left);
        stk.push(newWrap);
        curWrap->newNode->left = newWrap->newNode;
        curWrap = newWrap;
    }
    return curWrap;
}

Node *Clone(Node *root) {

    if(root == NULL) {
        return NULL;
    }

    Node *newRoot = NULL;
    stack<Wrap*> stk;

    Wrap *wrap = AllocWrap(root);
    stk.push(wrap);

    while(!stk.empty()) {
        wrap = PushLeftNodes(stk);
        if(((wrap->flags & 2) == 0) && (wrap->oldNode->right != NULL)) {
            wrap->flags  |= 2;
            Wrap *newWrap = AllocWrap(wrap->oldNode->right);
            stk.push(newWrap);
            wrap->newNode->right = newWrap->oldNode;
            continue;
        }

        wrap = stk.top();
        newRoot = wrap->newNode;
        stk.pop();
        delete wrap;
    }
    return newRoot;
}

int main() {
    Node *root = AllocNode(10);
    Node *curNode = root;

    curNode->left = AllocNode(5);
    curNode->right = AllocNode(15);

    curNode = curNode->left;
    curNode->left = AllocNode(14);

    curNode->right = AllocNode(17);

    curNode = curNode->right;
    curNode->left = AllocNode(18);
    curNode->right = AllocNode(45);

    curNode = root->right;
    curNode->right = AllocNode(33);

    curNode = curNode->right;
    curNode->right = AllocNode(46);

    cout << "Original tree : " << endl;
    InOrder(root);

    Node *newRoot = Clone(root);
    cout << "New tree : " << endl; 
    InOrder(newRoot);

    return 0;
}
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